Posts by Greggor

WordPress Security Myths

Currently almost 33% of websites run WordPress, so it’s important to make sure it’s secure. However, there are a few myths around about its security etc., a handful of them shown below.

1. SAFETY IN NUMBERS

Some believe that, since their website is just one of many, it isn’t interesting enough to get hacked. But, there is no such thing as being not big enough for hackers to notice you.

In fact, if you website’s brand new, some hackers may believe your site to be susceptible to an attack.

2. WORDPRESS IS AN INSECURE CONTENT MANAGEMENT PLATFORM

Another major misconception is that WordPress has a weak protection system. In fact, plugins have advanced enough to protect a website against most attacks (most hacks are found to be due to user error [weak password, outdated security system, etc.] more than anything else).

3. SECURE USERNAME AND PASSWORD SUFFICE

This misconception has led to numerous breaches; this problem can be avoided using a plugin like “All-in-One WP Security” or “WordFence”.

4. SSL CERTIFICATE GUARANTEES SAFETY

SSL only protects the information passed from user to website and vice versa; it doesn’t do anything to protect the data stored on said site. As mentioned before, security plugins can considerably mitigate this problem.

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Recover WordPress SEO after a Hack

If you’ve already restored and secured your website and you’re now more concerned with making sure that the search engine optimization of your site hasn’t been affected, here are some other things to do after a hack.

DOWNLOAD LATEST WORDPRESS AGAIN

This’ll ensure that you’re running the latest version and that all of your files are clear of malicious code.

CHECK WEBSITE FOR MALWARE THROUGH THE THEME EDITOR

This’ll help you confirm that the malware has been removed.

SET UP REDIRECTS (IF NECESSARY OR APPROPRIATE)

If the hackers created temporary pages on your website, setup 301 redirects. This’ll improve user experience and retain the value of any compromised pages indexed by search engines before you fixed them.

CHECK METADATA

A common hacking trick is changing website metadata. Just check your meta titles and meta descriptions.

CHECK WEBMASTER TOOLS

Google’s Webmaster Tools will help you see any malicious content on your site. You can even request a re-crawl of your site after cleanup.

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Why Your WordPress Site Doesn’t Rank High on Google

A website is critical to the success of your online business – it’s the first thing users will look for, so you have to make sure they can find you easily. Search engine optimization (SEO) is the only way to achieve this.

Ergo it is essential to understand the cause of low ranking, so let’s take a look!

GOOGLE HASN’T INDEXED YOUR WEBSITE

This happens to newly-launched WordPress sites since it takes a few weeks for this search engine giant to detect and list you.

Simply search ‘site:’ and add your domain name after it in the search box. If your website shows up as the first result, Google has indexed it, but if you can’t find it, then it may take a few days before you find it using that search query.

META TAGS ARE POORLY OPTIMIZED

Meta tags are website components that allow Google to analyze and rank your content. You have to make sure meta tags are crafted properly:

. Meta description: explains webpage content (up to 160 characters)
. Meta title: another way to keep Google informed about the content
. Image tags: visual elements are also crawled and analyzed, so make sure to mark images adequately.

WEBSITE’S NOT MOBILE-FRIENDLY

Your job is to build a responsive site that functions perfectly across multiple devices. This is best done by using a new, mobile-friendly theme, but it can also be done plugin-wise (WPTouch and JetPack being just two examples).

YOUR CONTENT IS BAD

Content is one thing that really has the power to make or break your online efforts. A typical first-page result on Google contains almost 2,000 words, so today’s users want to see, read, or hear in-depth analyses – it covers topics from all angles, giving visitors a thorough explanation of the topic in question.

YOU HAVE NO BACKLINKS

If no one shares or wants to share links that lead back to your website, it probably means you aren’t publishing quality content. Google takes it into account and labels your site as irrelevant, so you can’t rank much higher in user searches.

YOUR SITE LOADS SLOWLY

visitors typically expect a web page to load in less than three seconds. What you need to do make that possible is test your site’s load speed (such as Pingdom). These tests will show you everything you can do to make your site load faster.

YOU DON’T HAVE ANY SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITY

Social buzz improves the visibility of pages, so if you don’t have business accounts on platforms like Facebook or Instagram, you should start using them right away.

YOU HAVE TOO MANY AFFILIATE LINKS

Websites that focus on affiliate marketing instead of quality content are going to get penalized by Google sooner or later.

TOUGH COMPETITION

Lastly, competition may be too tough for a certain keyword. If that’s the case, focus on a less competitive niche by targeting the right audience and finding keywords that won’t overlap with the ones used by industry leaders.

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Reducing WordPress Site CPU Usage

While it’s praised for its ease of use and user-friendliness, it can also be resource-hungry. Fortunately there are simple fixes to said issue.

AVOID FANCY DESIGNS AND ANY GIMMICKS YOU WON’T BE USING

Make sure first and foremost that your website is fast-loading and message-focused before elegence – otherwise, you’re going to have a site that doesn’t convert well. Having a slider, for example, is nice but you will have to resize the images considerably so it doesn’t slow nearly everything (literally) down.

CHECK YOUR WEBSITE PLUGINS CAREFULLY

Sometimes what’s most resource-demanding is hidden behind the scenes because of plugins. Disable them one by one and test your site’s performance; then verify CPU usage when they’re turned off. Doing this will show you which you need to remove or replace.

OPTIMIZE IMAGES

Just as mentioned regarding your slider/s, if you don’t optimize them, they will demand their share of resources, rendering WordPress to operate less than optimally. We recommend a plugin call “resmush.it” which is very fast at such a process, and optimizes images upon upload.

GET A CONTENT DELIVERY NETWORK

By doing so, like using Cloudflare for instance, certain static files on your site (images, videos, etc.) are loaded from external servers, leaving more power for WordPress. Ergo, usage spikes are prevented.

CLEAN THE DATABASE REGULARLY

It’s not just the WP database that must be taken care of – many plugins grow in size over time by cluttering said database and require regular cleanups. There are plenty of plugins available for database cleanups and don’t require technical knowledge.

GET A CACHING PLUGIN

Instead of generating content every time a particular user visits your website, such a plugin will create static versions of your site’s webpages. Therefore, CPU usage is decreased even further.

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How to Fix HTTP Errors Uploading Images

One of the most annoying things that can happen to your WordPress site is an HTTP error when trying to upload images – there are many ways to deal with this issue.

CHECK IF THE ERROR REALLY EXISTS

Basically, just wait for a few minutes and then check if the error comes up again, because the error may only be temporary.

TRY USING ANOTHER BROWSER

If the error still comes up, the second easiest option is just to switch between browsers. Google Chrome can often disable image uploading, so just try Firefox, Opera, etc.

DEACTIVATE PLUGINS

HTTP errors like this one could happen right after installing a plugin, particularly if it’s for image optimization. Try even disabling other plugins before trying to upload your picture once more.

INCREASE THE MEMORY LIMIT

Problems in WordPress can be easily caused by memory limits – this can be easily fixed by adding the following code to wp-config.php:

define (‘WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’, ‘256M’);

By using this solution you will be solving your image upload problem and then some along the way, especially if your theme uses a lot of resources.

SWITCH BETWEEN IMAGE EDITORS

WordPress uses two image editors interchangeably: Imagick and GD Library. Imagick has the tendency to drain memory and henceforth cause HTTP errors. Just add the following code to your theme’s functions.php file:

function wpb_image_editor_default_to_gd( $editors ) {
$gd_editor = ‘WP_Image_Editor_GD’;
$editors = array_diff( $editors, array( $gd_editor ) );
array_unshift( $editors, $gd_editor );
return $editors;
}
add_filter( ‘wp_image_editors’, ‘wpb_image_editor_default_to_gd’ );

USE .HTACCESS

If you still want to use Imagick you can use another trick to prevent HTTP errors, which is to add this line of code to .htaccess:

SetEnv MAGICK_THREAD_LIMIT 1

CHECK YOUR THEME

Much like plugins, WordPress themes can also cause this HTTP error. Just try a different theme and see if the error still comes up.

UPGRADE PHP VERSION

If your hosting service is using an older PHP version, you’ll likely end up running into HTTP errors like this one and then some. If you can’t upgrade the PHP version from your control panel, you should either choose a more advanced service or change your provider entirely.

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