SEO Articles

11 Metrics to Measure WordPress Digital Marketing Success

WordPress Digital Marketing is a crucial aspect of any online business or website, especially if your goals are to reach new audiences and generate more traffic.

The internet and WordPress have provided you with a platform and an opportunity to gain more organic traffic to your site, reach a broader audience on social media, and generate more leads.

However, digital marketing is the only thing that will help you achieve your goals. Consequently, the only way you’ll know if you’re on the right track to reaching your goals is through metrics.

In this article, we’ll look at the best ways to measure your success and the most important metrics.

Let’s take a look.


Start with a goal

How do you know if you’re on the way to success if you haven’t defined what success is for you?

Also, knowing your goals gives you a clear direction – meaning you’ll know exactly what you’re striving towards.

Without goals, you’re extremely limited with your analysis, regardless of the metrics that you use.

Essentially, you’ll track your metrics and find out if you made some progress or not that much progress. It’s too vague and doesn’t prove overly helpful for digital marketing.


Your goal should include:

A definite time frame – This will help create a sense of urgency with your goals, and help you and your team drive towards them at a collected speed.

Real numbers – Try to give direct figures and stats when setting your goals. For instance, rather than saying “increase new visitors to your site,” opt for “drive 10,000 new visitors to the website.” It’s less ambiguous and gives you a checkpoint to aim for.

How you’ll achieve them – What are your methods for reaching your goals? What digital marketing tactics will you use?

Don’t forget to follow the “SMART goals” method, where every goal has to be:

S -Specific

M- Measurable

A – Achievable

R- Relevant

T – Time-bound


Set up a template

Every digital marketing campaign or strategy works best when there’s a template or plan to follow.

Your template will serve as a guideline, which will help you on your digital marketing journey. It should include factors like your initial goals, things that worked well, things that didn’t work so well, and an overview of what happened during every campaign.

Of course, once you decide on the metrics that you use, these can also be placed into this template.

Not only will this template help you track your current campaigns, but it will help you with future digital marketing strategies.


The best metrics for digital marketing with WordPress

Now that we have the logistics out of the way, it’s time to look into digital marketing metrics, that you can track.

There seems to be an infinite amount of metrics that you can use to track your success, but not all of these will be relevant to you and your specific goals.

Read through the below metrics, and decide which ones would be the best for your KPIs, and that should be the perfect starting point.


  1. Traffic and source

One of the most important metrics to measure is the overall website traffic.

Your website is a crucial aspect of your company or brand. It becomes your label, your home base, and often your first point of contact for many of your potential customers or clients.

For this reason, the majority of your digital marketing efforts will likely focus on driving traffic to your WordPress site.

Even if your individual goal is to gain more social media followers or develop your email list – this will ultimately be to acquire more visitors to your site.

You should continuously be tracking the traffic to your website. If your digital marketing strategy is working out, you’ll likely see a steady growth of traffic.

However, if you’re still conducting steady marketing efforts, and your traffic is declining, you may want to consider double-checking over your strategy, and troubleshooting your website.

Also, you should track where your traffic is coming from.

With such a vast array of different sources, it’s vital that you track every single root.

You can use this to determine which sources are the winners, and which ones may need a little more attention. It’s also a great way to decide where you will spend your precious time creating great content.

The primary website traffic sources are:

  • Organic search – The users that searched and clicked from a classic search engine like Google.
  • Direct Visitors – These visitors type in your URL straight from the search bar. They could have also bookmarked your website.
  • Social – These are the users that come to your website from social media or content posts.
  • Referrals – If a link to your site is featured on somebody else’s website, you will often gain users from this other website.

Pay close attention to these metrics and act upon them.


  1. Visitors

The next metric to track is your visitors. Specifically, whether they are new visitors or returning visitors.

Multiple visits can confirm that you are providing valuable information to people, and they will want to keep coming back.

New visitors can also indicate that your digital marketing strategies are essential. Both are important aspects.

As you release new content (like blogs), review your new vs. returning visitors metric just to check how well it is doing.

Depending on your goals and company, one may be of more importance than the other.

For instance, if you’re looking to drive more organic traffic to your site,

perhaps for a particular service, new visitors may be essential for you too.

If you’re a news site and want to measure how many people come back to your website and read your content, the returning visitor’s traffic metric may be of more importance.

If you want to increase your new and returning visitors, make sure to create and publish valuable content. Use social media to promote all your content, and use mailing lists to send to subscribers.


  1. Sessions

Sessions are the term for the number of visits that your website receives.

Google, as an example, counts sessions every 30 minutes – meaning if somebody enters your site in the morning and then later on in the evening, it will be considered as two unique sessions.

The metric you need to look out, in regards to sessions, is the duration. Basically, how long are your user’s spending on your website before they click off, and what might be the reason for this?

Some industries generally have longer average session duration. For instance, the hospital and healthcare industry’s average session time is over double that of the information sector.

There are multiple factors that can impact a session duration. For instance, if your website is easy to navigate, the information is easy to find, or if the content you post is valuable.

Tracking these metrics will enable you to make necessary changes. Hypothetically, you could add video content or increase the readability to increase the average session time.


  1. Most visited pages

If you’re trying to discover which pages your visitors find the most valuable, looking at this metric could be imperative. This could give you information on the pages you need to improve, as well as the pages which are performing well.

Google Analytics gives you an option to check out the Behavior Flow – this will help you find out where your site’s visitors are going, how long for, and other important factors.


  1. Pageviews

This is the metric for the total number of pages viewed. Importantly, a user who repeatedly visits the same page will trigger this specific metric. However, it remains a critical website traffic metric.

For digital marketing, it’s essential to know how many pages are visited on your website in any given time period. Just like the other metrics, it will help you understand if your site is of value, or if only individual pages are.

With these analytics, you can decide how you can make the entirety of your site just as successful as the other pages.

Remember, some of these metrics may be expected. For instance, your T&C page won’t have as many views as your home page. However, comparing why your “skincare” page has more views than your “meal plans” page, as an example, could be something to look into more.

Marketing benefits significantly from understanding the target audience more.


  1. Bounce rate

The bounce rate is the term given to users that leave your website (or bounce away) after only viewing one page.

The most common reasons why users bounce from a site is if the site takes too long to load, they quickly realized they weren’t going to find what they were looking for, an error page loaded, or they just weren’t compelled enough to stay.

It’s a great metric to track, as it can showcase how successful or fast your site is. You should, in general, aim to get the bounce rate as low as possible. The only exception is if your visitors enter another site that you send them to.

One of the best ways to combat user’s bouncing habits is by sending them to the specific page that they need or want straight away.

For example, if you’re marketing a specific product or service – make sure you send them directly to the page all about it.

Also, don’t forget to add a call to action, include graphics, and decrease your page load time.


  1. Exit rate

This metric is different to bounce rate, it’s a little more specific but reveals quite a lot.

“The exit rate will show you exactly where your users leave the website. Essentially, it shows you the exact moment when a user lost interest and decided to exit off your page. Knowing this will help you discover new ways to keep your audience and ensure that they don’t lose interest in the future.“ — Brenda Saunders, Marketing Specialist at Studicus.


  1. Conversion rate

You can also track the number of conversions made on your site – basically how many of your visitors turn into a download, lead entry, sale, or subscriber, for example.

Of course, other metrics play into this result, and it might not be the thing that you’re focusing on with your digital marketing campaign. However, this is still an important metric to track, and can often highlight to you if you’re making the right marketing moves.


  1. Social reach and engagement

This will require you to take a trip away from your WordPress site, but it’s still an important metric to track.

Social media metrics tell you exactly how many people reached/saw your content. As you increase your social media efforts, you should see a steady increase in the number of people that you’re visiting.

Use your WordPress site to fully promote and brand your social media profiles – even embedding your own tweets or Instagram posts into posts.

One step further is to reach social media engagement. This refers to the total number of people that interact with any social media post.

For instance:

  • Shares
  • Likes
  • Comments
  • Clicks
  • Retweets

It’s arguably the most social media metric to track, primarily if you’re focusing on social media in your digital marketing campaigns.

Engagement is also something that you have to do organically, making it one of the most important metrics to measure success.


  1. Click-through rate

While click-through rates are commonly used when talking about email marketing. However, it can be used when referring to the total number of clicks from any platform.

For instance, if you want your visitors to go to a particular page, you can track your click-through rate for all your marketing efforts.

Your click-through rate is essential to track, as it’s a great signifier of how well your marketing campaign is doing.


  1. Return on investment

If your digital marketing campaign is costing you money, it’s imperative that you track your return on investment.

Tracking this metric should not come as a surprise, chances are you’re likely already doing this.

The ROI equates to how much investment you’ve made, and also how much you have earned from this.

It’s super easy to lose track of how much money you’re spending, the ROI makes it easy to make sure you’re not going over budget, or wasting money on a campaign that isn’t working for you.


What tools can I use?

Now that we have all the necessary metrics out of the way, it’s time to look into the tools that you can use.

WordPress already puts you at such an advantage. The platform offers you a range of different tools and plugins that you can install.

The key is to not go overboard with how many metrics you measure and the tools you use to do it. Otherwise, it will get overly confusing.


Google analytics

Of course, the number one analytics is definitely Google Analytics. It’s completely free and can be installed using the plugin option on your WordPress site.

You can also install it directly by adding code if that’s something you’re familiar with.

Google Analytics will give you insights into the majority of the metrics that are listed above.


MonsterInsights

This can be used in tangent with Google Analytics, enhancing the benefits. Again, this is one of the best analytics solutions for your WordPress site and shows you useful reports that will track your digital marketing efforts.

This plugin will add a website statistics dashboard into your WordPress admin area. It shows you your top traffic sources – something that is imperative to track. It also ranks your top blog posts, pages, and more – giving you a concise way to see if your marketing efforts are working.

If you’re an e-commerce store, this also comes with tracking for your e-commerce site. Using this data can help prevent cart abandonment on your website.


Social media insights

Of course, you should also be using built-in analytics on your social media profiles.

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest all offer insights. These will give you all the information that you need regarding reach and engagement.

With these insights, you can work our why individual posts perform better than others, and what you can do to improve your reach and engagement.

Once you have all the metrics in front of you, you can make the necessary changes. Hence why metrics are a crucial aspect of digital marketing.


Conclusion

Keeping a close eye on your website’s numbers is absolutely necessary, especially if you’re introducing a new digital marketing strategy to your WordPress site.

As with everything, it’s essential to define your own success and set realistic expectations and goals. Digital marketing can be a slow process, but seeing steady inclines can be all the information you need to know how well your site is doing.

While merely tracking your social media followers might give you an idea, but it won’t give you an in-depth summary of why and how you’re achieving your goals. e

The metrics above will help ensure that you’re going in the right direction. If not, it will help you decide where and how to make the necessary changes.

The post 11 Metrics to Measure WordPress Digital Marketing Success appeared first on WP Fix It.

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6 Plugins to Improve Your WordPress Performance

Part of running a successful website is making sure that it is performing as well as possible. You want your site optimized not only for the search engines but also for your visitors. Here is why the performance of your WordPress site is essential as well as several plugins you can use to improve the speed and performance of a WordPress.


Why You Should Care About WordPress Performance 

How your site performs is more important than ever for a variety of reasons. People simply don’t have the patience to wait for a slow website to load. Studies have shown that a site loading speed of over 2 seconds will generally result in about 47% of visitors abandoning their efforts. So, you’ll need to speed up your site to keep about half of your visitors interested.

WordPress performance also factors into your search engine rankings, which helps people find you online. Google now gives preference to websites that have faster loading times than those with slower ones, so an optimized site can help you improve your position in the SERPs.


6 Plugins to Improve WordPress Performance

The good news is that you don’t need to know how to code or do anything technical to improve your WordPress performance. It’s a user-friendly content management system (CMS) that allows you to make minor and major tweaks through themes and plugins.

Websites have common bottlenecks that slow them down and reduce performance, such as large image sizes, poor organization, and too many processes. Besides having a managed WordPress hosting for your site, here are six plugins that address many of these issues and help you improve WordPress performance.


1. Swift Performance Lite

If you’re looking to make your WordPress site as fast as possible, another optimization tool you’ll want to check out is the Swift Performance Lite plugin. This is a free caching and performance plugin for WordPress that will significantly speed up your site. Some of its features include:

  • Combine CSS/Javascript
  • Minify CSS/Javascript/HTML
  • Eliminate render-blocking Javascript and CSS above-the-fold in content
  • Leverage compression and browser caching
  • Optimize images
  • Remove query strings from static resources
  • Organize plugins

2. Tinypng

Images are major contributors to a web page’s size. It can significantly slow down page loading and increase the speed index of your WordPress. The trick is to reduce the size of your images without compromising their quality. Doing this manually with Photoshop or some other tool would be time-consuming. Fortunately, there is a plugin for that.

Tinypng is an online image optimization tool that also comes in plugin format. It will compress and optimize your JPEG and PNG images automatically. Some of its features include:

  • Automatic optimization of images when uploaded
  • Advanced image optimization in the background
  • Optimize images already in your media library
  • Set max parameters for images to resize large images
  • Option for preserve copyright metadata of images
  • Compatible with WPML, Multisite, and WooCommerce

3. WP Optimize

If your WordPress database is a mess, your site isn’t going to perform as well as it should. Over time, a MySQL database can end up with redundant databases and tables. You need cleaning tools like WP Optimize can remove any unnecessary stuff so that your site continues to perform at the highest level.

This plugin has several powerful features:

  • Cleans your database – It will search for remove and unnecessary data such as trackbacks, pingbacks, trashed and spam comments, and expired options. It gives you complete control over which options it will carry out and can do these at the intervals you select (weekly, etc.).
  • Compress images – The plugin comes with an image compression tool that will compress JPG, PNG, BMP, GIF, and TIF files up to 5MG in size. It will also do bulk compression, and auto-compress as images are uploaded.
  • Caching function – WP Optimize also has a caching engine that will temporarily store data for faster loading website loading.

4. Yoast SEO

If you want your WordPress site to get found by your intended audience, you’ll need to optimize it for the search engines. Yoast SEO, one of the most complete and powerful WordPress SEO plugins, can help you do this.

Once you install and activate the plugin, some of its valuable features include:

  • Advanced XML sitemaps functionality
  • Keyword optimization
  • Full control over breadcrumbs
  • Title and meta description templating
  • Content and SEO analysis
  • Content snippet previews
  • Create cornerstone content
  • Bulk edit content
  • Manage SEO roles

Yoast is a free plugin, and there is also a premium version. If you decide to upgrade, some of the advanced features you can access include managing redirects, suggestions for internal linking, content insights, and free support.


5. All in One WP Security Firewall

Even though WordPress is considered secure, it accounts for 90% of all hacked CMS sites. So, every step you take towards more security for your site will increase its performance. One way to take your WordPress site’s security to new a level is with the All In One WP Security & Firewall plugin.

This is a feature-rich plugin that comes with “basic,” “intermediate,” and “advanced” security and firewall features. Some of its features include:

  • Hardens user account security
  • Protects against “Brute Force Login Attacks” with a site lockdown feature
  • Add Google reCaptcha to the login system
  • User registration security features
  • Database security
  • File system security features
  • Blacklist functionality
  • Firewall features
  • Comment spam monitoring
  • Security scanner

6. UpdraftPlus

It would be a shame to work on your site for months or years and then lose everything in the blink of an eye because of an error or the actions of a hacker. This is why having backups are vital. UpdraftPlus makes backing up WordPress a seamless process.

This WordPress backup and restoration plugin does just what you would expect – and more. It backs up everything onto the cloud according to your set schedule. It will then restore your website with the click of a button. And it’s simple to use.

You can also use UpdraftPlus to clone and migrate your website to a new domain or a new host. This was once a complex process, but this plugin makes it simple with just a few clicks.


Conclusions

The biggest advantage of improving your WordPress performance is that it will help the experience of your visitors. The secondary benefit is that a higher-performing website is going to rank better in the SERPs, which will also give you more visibility on the web and help your business achieve its goals.

The post 6 Plugins to Improve Your WordPress Performance appeared first on WP Fix It.

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New Keyword Tool

Our keyword tool is updated periodically. We recently updated it once more.

For comparison sake, the old keyword tool looked like this

Whereas the new keyword tool looks like this

The upsides of the new keyword tool are:

  • fresher data from this year
  • more granular data on ad bids vs click prices
  • lists ad clickthrough rate
  • more granular estimates of Google AdWords advertiser ad bids
  • more emphasis on commercial oriented keywords

With the new columns of [ad spend] and [traffic value] here is how we estimate those.

  • paid search ad spend: search ad clicks * CPC
  • organic search traffic value: ad impressions * 0.5 * (100% – ad CTR) * CPC

The first of those two is rather self explanatory. The second is a bit more complex. It starts with the assumption that about half of all searches do not get any clicks, then it subtracts the paid clicks from the total remaining pool of clicks & multiplies that by the cost per click.

The new data also has some drawbacks:

  • Rather than listing search counts specifically it lists relative ranges like low, very high, etc.
  • Since it tends to tilt more toward keywords with ad impressions, it may not have coverage for some longer tail informational keywords.

For any keyword where there is insufficient coverage we re-query the old keyword database for data & merge it across. You will know if data came from the new database if the first column says something like low or high & the data came from the older database if there are specific search counts in the first column

For a limited time we are still allowing access to both keyword tools, though we anticipate removing access to the old keyword tool in the future once we have collected plenty of feedback on the new keyword tool. Please feel free to leave your feedback in the below comments.

One of the cool features of the new keyword tools worth highlighting further is the difference between estimated bid prices & estimated click prices. In the following screenshot you can see how Amazon is estimated as having a much higher bid price than actual click price, largely because due to low keyword relevancy entities other than the official brand being arbitraged by Google require much higher bids to appear on competing popular trademark terms.

Historically, this difference between bid price & click price was a big source of noise on lists of the most valuable keywords.

Recently some advertisers have started complaining about the “Google shakedown” from how many brand-driven searches are simply leaving the .com part off of a web address in Chrome & then being forced to pay Google for their own pre-existing brand equity.

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How To Fix WordPress Errors – 25 Most Common

Knowing how to fix WordPress errors will ensure your site is always running smoothly.

WordPress is continuing to expand its horizons. WordPress 5.0 continues to get mixed reviews. More and more WordPress developers keep on adding wonderful plugins and themes to the burgeoning libraries of the CMS. And all along, the body of knowledge of common WordPress issues faced by end users also continues to expand.

In this guide, we’re going to cover 25 very common WordPress errors, and more importantly, will also tell you how to fix them.

Note: While we’ve taken care to cover all troubleshooting tips in great detail, we also strongly recommend that you take a backup of your WordPress website before making any major changes.


Internal server error

Here’s a dreaded one.

Beginners are well and truly flummoxed with this problem, because the error message doesn’t offer a clue of the nature of the cause.

So, you may need to try more than one troubleshooting tactics.

Probably the .htaccess file is corrupted. Here’s how you can resolve the problem.

  • Rename the current htaccess file to something else
  • For this, use the File Manager app in your web hosting account’s dashboard
  • Locate the file, right click it, select the option to edit or rename, and change the name
  • Revisit your WordPress website and see if the problem is solved
  • If it does, then go to Settings > Permalink
  • Save without making any changes here
  • This generates a new htaccess file

Or, you may need to increase PHP memory limit. Here are some steps you can try to fix this error.

  • Make a blank file names php.ini
  • Type in this code in the file
    memory=64MB
  • Save file
  • Upload to /wp-admin/ folder using FTP

If you receive a message that explicitly states a PHP memory limit related error, the above steps will be very useful.

There could be other causes, such as a plugin gone wrong.

Did the internal server error start after you installed a new plugin? If yes, you may want to deactivate it and see if the error goes away. If this is the case, write to the developer, and also check whether he/she’s addressed the problem on any web forum already.


The new theme’s installed correctly, yet the homepage doesn’t look like it should

Don’t lose heart, and don’t curse the theme developer. The solution may be a few clicks away.

In the WordPress admin panel, go to Settings > Reading.

Here, look for the option called ‘front page displays’

Now because you’re using a homepage template, you need to tell WordPress to set a static page as the front display.


The theme is missing the style.css stylesheet

So, you just paid for a premium theme, downloaded the files, uploaded them, only to stare at this ugly error message.

Wait, the solution is so simple, it may baffle you.

  • Unzip the theme folder you downloaded.
  • Look for a style.css file in the main directory, or in any of the subdirectories
  • Once found, zip it and upload to WordPress
  • You can also upload the theme folder via an FTP

Your changes don’t reflect on your posts

So, you’re trying to get in a quick update to your WordPress website page, and although the change is done on the editor, you don’t see it on the web page.

The solution – simply wait a few seconds.

Didn’t work? Maybe your web browser is still referring to a recently cached copy of the web page. Refresh the web browser and see it it works.

Another issue could be that you may have been logged out of your WordPress backend while making the changes. While ‘Autodraft’ (WordPress’ autosave functionality) will keep you safe, it’s better you copy the post content (or the part you changed), log in again, and simply paste and publish.


A plugin stopped working all of a sudden

That can be very irritating. Thankfully, the solution is often easier than you anticipate.

It’s highly likely that any of your recent software changes (whether it’s a WordPress upgrade, a config change, or the installation of another similar plugin) may be behind this change.

If you remember and suspect that any such change may have caused the plugin to malfunction, check whether anybody else has reported a similar problem to the developer.

Also, it could be that you’re using an outdated plugin version (particularly if you don’t use this plugin often enough).

Go to Administration > Plugin, and check whether there’s a notification of an update available for the plugin in question.

Source

Note: now that you’re here, it makes sense to remove plugins you don’t need/use anymore, and update others where you see an update notification.

Also, if you use a lot of plugins, consider using a plugin to manage their updates; something like the Easy Updates Manager.


The editor window doesn’t show you buttons

Often, users complain that the WordPress editor goes “white” and all its buttons disappear.

This is how it may look like.

The cause: concatenated JavaScript may not be functioning properly.

Or, if you recently installed an activated a plugin that tinkers with WordPress TinyMCE, you may see this problem.

How to solve this?

Option 1 – Log out, and log in. Yes, this works more often than you’d expect.

Option 2 – Clear the browser cache and check.

Option 3 – Replace the TinyMCE script in your WordPress. The folder is  /wp-includes/js/tinymce/


Image Gallery Errors

When you’re chasing a deadline, and realize you can’t get WordPress to show your images in the media library, things can get stressful.

One of the causes could be a misconfiguration in the shared hosting server. An upgrade by the web host could have changed the file permissions.

To solve this, you will need to correct the file permissions.

Go to your website’s /wp-content/ folder, right click on the Uploads directory, select the File Permissions option.

Now, set the permissions value to 744.

Mark the “recurse into subdirectories” and “apply to directories only” options.

In a similar way, you will need to change the permission for files in the Uploads directory to 644.

Once these changes are done, go back to the admin area and see if the issue is resolved.


The “File Exceeds The upload_max_filesize Error”

While uploading HD quality images, you may come across this error. Sesolution, thankfully, is pretty easy.

The simplest way to solve this problem is to edit the htaccess file, which you can find in the root folder.

Copy and paste this code in the file.

### Change max file size for file uploads

php_value upload_max_filesize 64M

php_value post_max_size 64M

php_value max_execution_time 300

php_value max_input_time 300

Note: We’d discussed the php.ini method earlier in this guide. That method will work to solve this problem also.


Mixed Content Error

This error could cause your end users to suspect whether the website is safe enough. That’s even more so because with this error in play, browsers won’t show the green padlock that signifies the security of a website.

If you’ve recently installed a TLS/SSL certificate, chances are you’ll experience this error.

The reason – images may be hard coded to use HTTP, which means they’re still loaded over HTTP instead of HTTPS.

Install a plugin to rewrite the old URLs for affected images, and then deactivate it.


Thumbnails appear distorted

When you move to a better WordPress theme, you may face this problem. Herein, you will experience that image thumbnails appear distorted, and hence spoil the look of your website.

Reason: the new theme may be defaulting a higher display resolution for the thumbnails, whereas WordPress only has the previous (lower quality) thumbnail copies.

You need to, hence, regenerate the thumbnails.

We recommend you use a plugin to do this and then simply remove it from your WordPress. The Regenerate Thumbnails plugin is a good option.

It dumbs down the entire process to a few clicks.


WordPress is not sending out emails

Are you not getting emails from WordPress? Are your emails landing in the SPAM folders in your audiences’ mailboxes?

The reason – the WordPress hosting server may not be using the PHP mail function properly.

And even if it’s working properly, chances are the email service provider is either rejecting the emails or marking as spam, because the email doesn’t actually originate from the source it claims to be. This is a common problem for anybody using PHP emailing.

Instead, switch to SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol). You could use a free service such as MailGun (with 10,000 free emails/month, it’s pretty useful for small WordPress websites).


The White Screen of Death

Here’s a nasty one. Just blankness, nothing else.

It’s most commonly caused because of PHP or database errors. That said, you can try out certain tricks to resolve it quickly.

  1. Empty the browser cache and try again.
  2. Try to remember whether a theme or plugin installation is the last major action you took and whether it could have caused the problem. Undo the steps.
  3. Deactivate all plugins.
  4. Debug the wp-config.php file – to do this, open the file, and look for this code:
define( 'WP_DEBUG', false );

Here, change the false to true and this will enable debugging.

This can further help by revealing the error that’s causing the white screen of death, which makes resolution easier.

  1. Ask your web host whether any web server changes may be causing this.

Connection Timed Out

Again, a very common problem.

We’ve already covered two methods of solving this problem.

  1. The php.ini method
  2. The wp-config.php file edit method

Try out both, and invariably the problem will disappear.


The site ahead contains harmful programs

Did you observe Google showing a warning while attempting to load your website?

The reasons could be:

Your website is affected by a trojan or malware. Or it’s showing advertisements to ads that in turn have a bad reputation.

Or, you installed a plugin from an unverified source.

Go to Google Webmasters Tools and see if you have received intimation related to any specific security issues with your website.

If that’s not the case, you need to hire an expert to identify and resolve the issue.

Once convinced you’ve resolved all issues, use this form to request Google to remove the warning.

We can also clean this up for you and secure your site.  See full details at https://wpfixit.com/product/wordpress-malware-removal-service.


WordPress keeps on logging you out

Maybe you’re not using a URL to access the login page that matches the URL declared in your website’s WordPress settings.

Go to Settings > General.

Make sure the WordPress Address and Site Address are same.


Sidebar is below the content instead of the side

The reason – you’re probably using too many div tags.

Use an HTML validator to find out and correct this.

Also, this could be because of a recent change made to your website’s style.css file. Undo the change and see if the problem is solved.


Locked out of WordPress account

We’re assuming you’ve forgotten your password, and for some reason, the recovery email is not being delivered to you (maybe you forgot the mailbox login too!).

Don’t worry, there’s a backdoor entry you can use.

Reset the password inside the database, by using PhpMyAdmin.

Locate the wp_users table, identify your username from the user_login column. Now, click edit

Next, you will see your hashed password.

Delete it and write the new password. Select MD5 from the drop down to the left of the password field, and save.

You will be able to log in via the new password.


WordPress stuck in maintenance mode

What if you get locked out of your website which is under maintenance (for an upgrade) and all users always get the detestable “we will be back soon” message?

This can happen.

The solution – go to the root directory using FTP and look for a file called .maintenance. Simply delete this file. Problem solved.


Are you sure you want to do this?

This persistent message can irritate you out of your wits.

Reasons could be any of these:

  • Trying to upload a damaged data file
  • A website security issue
  • You’re out of PHP memory
  • The theme/plugins that’s leading to this screen isn’t properly coded

To resolve, you’ll need to ascertain which of the above issues is causing the problem.

We’ve already explained how you can expand PHP memory.

A plugin/theme code related issue is best handled by contacting the original developer.

Also, ascertain your data file isn’t corrupted.


Parse error

This results from a coding error in your theme file.

The error message shows the affected file. So, go to your WordPress directory via FTP, download the file with the code error, correct it (or hire a developer to do that) and replace the original with this corrected file.


RSS Feed error

Is your RSS feed returning an error such as this?

This could because of many reasons – a faulty theme file, a dysfunctional plugin, an XML parsing error, etc.

We recommend you use a plugin to resolve the problem and then deactivate it.

Fix My Feed RSS Repair is a very effective plugin to do this.


WordPress Auto Update is Failing

Auto update takes a lot of stress out of your work, as it takes care of all necessary core, theme, and plugin updates you need.

What if it doesn’t work and returns an error message such as this:

How To Fix WordPress Errors

To resolve this, go to your WordPress directory and navigate to the file under Upgrade folder. Set the file permissions to 777 and you’re done.

How To Fix WordPress Errors


Too many redirects

Here’s the error message:

We explained how it’s important to ensure that the URLs in your settings > general are same.

If this is done, and you still face the error, then roll back the latest changes you did after which the error started showing up.


Conclusion

Now this is, by no means, an exhaustive list. We’ll continue to face problems, and we’ll continue solving them. The next time you see a problem, fret not, and use the tips and tricks we’ve shared. At least now you will know How To Fix WordPress Errors when these most commons ones arise.

The post How To Fix WordPress Errors – 25 Most Common appeared first on WP Fix It.

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Why we need to think of entities and the future of SEO

It’s time to think of the future of SEO. What should we focus on? It’s time to find out more about entities and how they affect our SEO strategies.

Brighton SEO is an exciting conference for everyone who wants to find out more about the latest trends and tactics in all things SEO. No matter how experienced you are, there’s always a session to inspire you to try out new ideas.

Greg Gifford, Vice President of Search at Wikimotive, talked about entities and the future of SEO.

Brighton SEO speaks of the future of SEO

Defining entities for SEO

Google is considering an entity a thing or concept that is singular, unique, well-defined, and distinguishable. In fact, according to Greg Gifford, entities are the most important concept in SEO.

It was back in 2012 that Google moved to entity search. Real-world entities and their relationships started being ranking signals. A year later, Google started focusing on the semantics to make its ranking algorithm smarter. Then we found out in 2015 that ranking search results started being based on entity metrics.

Thus, it’s time to start focusing more on entities and how they affect our SEO.

It’s useful to remember then that every site consists of numerous entities. The internal links are simply the relationships between entities. Our content is simply made up of entities and their relationships.

The future of search

When thinking of the future of search, we need to keep in mind that Google is becoming smarter.

Here are Gifford’s tips that will future-proof your SEO strategy:

  • The ranking will be more about real-world signals. This means that we need to explore the right balance between our current SEO tactics and the brand we are building with old-school marketing.
  • Voice search is all about the intent of conversational queries. Conversational content will become very important.
  • Mobile search will continue to make local SEO vital for everyone. Consuming content through mobile phones is pushing us to think of our mobile strategies and how we can improve them. In fact, local SEO will be the key to our future success. As Greg Gifford reminds us, links from local businesses will matter even if they are unrelated to your business.
  • Google My Business is your direct interface to Google’s entity information about your business. It is further blending into mobile SERPs that will blur the lines even more between online and offline actions. In fact, real-world offline actions related to business entities will help your ranking.
  • Start writing content that answers questions in a unique way. It’s helpful to read your content out loud. Conversational content will help you master the new world of entities and their relationships that affect ranking.
  • Another excellent tip that can be very helpful is to think like you’re targeting rich snippets. It’s not the goal but it’s the right mindset to help you create more relevant content.

Four things we need to stop doing in SEO

According to Greg Gifford, we need to stop doing these things that will affect the future success of our SEO strategy:

1. Stop concentrating on keyword matching

SEO will be less about writing content with the right keywords and more about having the best answer based on the intent of the search.

2. Stop concentrating on single pages

Build your entity and pay attention to how it’s connected to other entities instead.

3. Stop thinking about optimizing individual page elements

The optimization should not focus on one page but rather on the overall entities and how their relationships can improve your success.

4. Stop concentrating on link building as the most important SEO tactic

Links will probably always matter but will be less important as Google gets better at understanding entity signals.

Focus on the entities and their relationships

There are many interesting takeaways from this session in Brighton SEO that can be useful when planning your strategy for 2020.

  • Make sure you’re paying attention to local SEO.
  • If you want to improve your online business, focus on the right balance between offline and online relationship building.
  • Mobile search will be more important than ever so make sure you create content for mobile users.
  • Your content should be conversational. Don’t be afraid to read it out loud before you publish it.
  • There’s no need to spend too much time on individual pages and keywords if you forget to look at the bigger picture.

You can also find the session’s slides here for more details.

What future trends can you spot for SEO in 2020? Share them in the comments.

The post Why we need to think of entities and the future of SEO appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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How Page Speed Affects SEO & Google Rankings | The 2019 Page Speed Guide

Speed is very important for a website. It’s so important that Google has made it an actual ranking factor. Over time, Google has taken action to improve the loading speed of websites by providing a set of tools for developers and webmasters. One of these tools is Google Lighthouse.

 

But how does this PageSpeed Insights Tool from Google actually work? And, more importantly, does page speed affect SEO? You’ll find everything you need to know in this article.

how_page_speed_affects_google_ranking

 

The PageSpeed Insights Tool didn’t use to be very good in the past. Most of the information there could be found relatively easy elsewhere and it didn’t quite indicate speed itself. However, Google has recently updated the tool and it’s a lot better. Unfortunately, it’s also a lot harder to understand.

 

However, this tool has became popular among SEOs through PageSpeed Insights, which is, in fact, powered by Lighthouse, but provides the information in an easy to follow format, on a web page.

 

  1. What Is Google PageSpeed Insights?
    1. Mobile vs. Desktop
    2. What is page speed actually?
  2. Does PageSpeed Insights Affect SEO? Is 100/100 Score Essential?
  3. PageSpeed Insights Metrics
    1. Field & Lab Data (Performance Metrics)
    2. Opportunities & Diagnostics
  4. How Is the PageSpeed Insights Score Calculated?
  5. Key Points in Improving the PageSpeed Insights Score
    1. Server response time
    2. Image compression
    3. HTML & CSS Structure
    4. Minification & Script Compression
    5. Cache Policy
    6. Lightweight Theme & Plugins
  6. How to Bulk Check the PageSpeed Insights Score
  7. Other Tools for Measuring & Improving Site Speed
    1. Pingdom
    2. GT-Metrix
    3. mod_pagespeed
    4. Google AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages)
 

What Is Google PageSpeed Insights?

 

PageSpeed Insights is an online tool provided by Google which is used to identify web performance issues on sites. Although mostly related to technical SEO issues, the tools also analyze the site from a User Experience and accessibility point of view.

 

You can access PageSpeed Insights by visiting https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/insights/.

 

PageSpeed Insights Home

 

You can enter the URL there and after a few seconds the tool will return a page with some results regarding your website’s performance. At the top, there will be a general score, which is an average of multiple factors. Below you will see detailed information about what actually affects your speed.

 

However, it isn’t the only PageSpeed tool provided by Google. There also is mod_pagespeed, a server module used to solve these speed issues, and the full fledged Lighthouse (the site analysis tool that powers everything), available in Chrome itself. There are also a number of Chrome Extensions related to Google’s PageSpeed Insights.

 

We will discuss briefly about all of them throughout this article, but we will focus mainly on PageSpeed Insights as it seems to be the handiest tool most SEOs use when checking a website.

 

Mobile vs. Desktop

 

When you insert a page to test it, Google will give two scores: one for the mobile version and one for the desktop version.

 

Initially, the PageSpeed Tool only gave one score, for the Desktop version. But recently, mobile usage has became more and more popular. As of 2018, more than 50% of search engine users search on mobile devices. As Google moved to a mobile first index, it also made sense for them to test mobile versions for speed first.

 

PageSpeed Mobile vs Desktop

 

However, if you have a responsive design, you might think that these versions are mostly identical.

 

If so, why do they have different scores?

 

Mobile: When you use the PageSpeed Insights tool, the first result you’ll get is for mobile speed. This means that your website has been tested on a mobile connection, probably with a 4G connection, as it seems to be the most common speed around the US at least.

 

Mobile Network Coverage

https://www.uscellular.com/coverage-map/voice-and-data-maps.html

 

However, keep in mind that many mobile users around the world still get only 3G signal and, although they have a slower connection speed, they still expect the website to load really fast.

 

And here’s the problem. It’s not always about your site, it’s more about the connection’s speed. It might seem like your site is slow when, in reality, the connection speed is slow.

 

Desktop: On desktop, the score is higher because the connection speed is higher. That’s just the thing with light and fiber optics. Unless you live in the UK, of course, and still have cups and string internet.

 

So the website goes through the same testing, but it’s mostly the connection speed that differs.

 

That’s why mobile comes first, as mobile devices usually have slower connections. Things might change with 5G but, until then, make sure you focus on improving your site speed for mobile devices.

 

What exactly is Page Speed?

 

OK, so we know what the tool does: it gives a score based on how fast it thinks your site is. But what exactly is page speed?

 

Page Speed is the speed at which an individual page loads on your website. Different pages can have different speeds due to factors such as images and scripts.

 

But speed is relative. It depends on so many factors such as the website’s performance, the server’s performance, the particular web page you’re on, the connection type, the user’s internet service provider, the internet package, the device’s processing power, the Browser, what the user is doing at that point, how many apps are running and so on.

 

However, we can only work with what we can work, which is our website and our server. We don’t really have control over the rest.

 

Just to get things straight, page speed isn’t a score, like PageSpeed Insights presents. It’s a web page’s loading time and it is measured in seconds. That’s what matters.

 

That’s why Google PageSpeed Insights wasn’t so good in the past. It didn’t quite give you information about how fast your website is actually loading. Just scores.

 

And that’s why this new version is just so good. It tells you everything you need to know about actual loading speed while also keeping the good stuff from the old version.

 

There are, of course, different points of interest in the loading time. For example, you may want to run some scripts towards the end because they don’t need to be used initially.

 

They might take a lot to finish loading, so the total loading time could be higher. But if the site is usable until then, it isn’t such a big problem.

 

Fast Website Loading Speed

 

For example, let’s say you want to run an exit intent pop-up script. That script takes a hypothetical 5-10 seconds to load. However, you want to show it to the user only after about 20-30 seconds.

 

If you start running your script immediately, you might postpone loading other important elements, such as the first thing the user should see: the above the fold content. This would be very bad, especially since you’re not going to use that script until about 20-30 seconds in the future.

 

So you can postpone loading the script after everything else that is vital loads in order to give the user a better experience.

 

However, if you have a script that makes the menu work or something vital to the usability of the website, you might not want to load it towards the end. This would ruin the experience as the user would not be able to access that function before everything else is loaded.

 

Does Page Speed Affect SEO? Is 100/100 Insights Score Essential?

 

The simple answer is that page speed does affect SEO. Page speed is a direct ranking factor, a fact known even better since Google’s Algorithm Speed Update. However, speed can also affect rankings indirectly, by increasing the bounce rate and reducing dwell time

 

 

At Google, users come first. Studies by Google show that average 3G loading speed is very slow. They also show that users leave the site after about 3 seconds. This means that their experience is bad and Google doesn’t like ranking sites which provide bad user experience.

 

 

 

What you must remember is that speed is measured in seconds, not in points from 0 to 100. While PageSpeed Insights is a tool that helps you improve speed, the score there doesn’t necessarily mean anything in the real world.

 

Even so, it is important to improve the Page Speed Score.

 

Why?

 

Because with Google we don’t know for sure whether the score there is or is not used as a ranking factor. Does Google use seconds? Does it use the score? Who knows…

 

However, I’ve seen sites with perfect pagespeed score ranking poorly and websites with a score lower than 50 that rank very well (#youtube).

 

However, you have to take into account how Google makes these tests. We don’t know where the tests are performed from. Is your server from Romania and Google tests it with a 3G connection in the US? Well then, you can obviously expect low speeds.

 

 

But just for the user’s sake, put the loading time first. And don’t use only PageSpeed Insights to test that. Stick to the end and I’ll show you a couple of tools which you can use to test the speed at which your website loads from different locations.

 

Sometimes, Google contradicts itself!

 

For example, Google PageSpeed Insights considers the Google Analytics script render blocking, which means you should load it later, in the footer. However, Google Analytics specifies it pretty clearly that the script must be placed in the <head> section of your website, otherwise it won’t work properly and won’t initially be accepted as a valid install.

 

So you get a small score hit in PageSpeed Insights… by doing what Google says… just to be told that you shouldn’t do it like that… by Google. You get the point.

 

Also, you can’t cache the script properly unless you store the analytics.js file on your server. That’s obviously something Google Analytics doesn’t recommend. It’s also a hell for maintenance, as every time Google Analytics JavaScript file gets an update, you would have to update it on your site as well.

 

This, of course, doesn’t happen only with Google tools and scripts but with any 3rd party script you don’t have control over.

 

In our defense, even YouTube, which is owned by Google and should theoretically set an example, has a pretty slow PageSpeed Insights score, at least at the time of writing this article.

 

Slow YouTube PageSpeed

 

But that doesn’t mean that the site loads slow. You can see that the field data (for which there is plenty of, as it’s YouTube) says the site loads in pretty much 4 seconds, which isn’t actually bad, considering that recently YouTube provides video previews in the thumbnails.

 

You can also test your site with https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/intl/en-gb/feature/testmysite/ to get a more simple explanation of how fast your site loads!

 

ThinkWithGoogle Test Mobile Speed

 

Our other business’s website, BrandMentions loads in under 2 seconds on a 4G connection, as you can see above. We would see it as pretty good. Sure, there’s always room for improvement. By Google standards… it’s average.

 

However, Google seems to consider cognitiveSEO’s website speed slow, even though it loads in a little over 3 seconds, which is still pretty fast considering the amount of 3rd party tools we’re using.

 

CognitiveSEO

Note that you’ll have to go under 1 second to be considered fast! To do so, you’ll probably need a very simple site with no 3rd party plugins or fancy pop-ups. Not easy if you actually want to do some digital marketing.

 

So yes, loading speed is important for SEO, but a perfect PageSpeed Insights score is not. As long as your website loads in around 3 seconds, you should be fine with most users.

 

PageSpeed Insights Metrics

 

Since so many things can affect site speed, Google breaks everything up in different categories in the PageSpeed Insights Tool, for a better understanding of the issues.

 

This is helpful as Google also provides some sort of prioritization, showing you what exactly affects speed the most.

 

Field & Lab Data

 

These are the new metrics that are actually useful. They are split into two categories: field and lab data.

 

Field data is what’s important in the real world, as it’s the data extracted by Google from real users, either through Chrome or other data providers.

 

Sure, it’s an average and if Google doesn’t yet have enough data it will let you know.

 

Origin Summary shows an average of the site’s speed as a whole. This way you can have an idea on how your page compares to the site and how the site compares to other sites in the Chrome User Experience Report.

 

Lab data, although still useful, could be considered less important as it is collected from a controlled environment. This means that it’s tested through a single connection and it doesn’t aggregate data from multiple users.

 

The lab data is what actually generates the Google page speed score.

 

Due to the fact that Google doesn’t always have field data, it uses the lab data which is performed on the spot to analyze your site.

 

First Contentful Paint represents the moment when the users sees something on your web page for the first time. If you look at the series of images you can actually spot how it looks:

 

First Contentful Paint

 

As you can see, the page has not fully rendered, something has displayed there.

 

First Meaningful Paint is the second step, let’s say, if we take the results above as an example. It represents the point at which the user can actually understand the first piece of content. For example, some readable text or an image displays, instead of just colors and backgrounds.

 

Speed Index is a more complex metric. It measures how quickly elements on your website are visibly populated. The faster they start to appear, the better. You’re looking for a lower score here, as it’s also measured in seconds.

 

First CPU Idle represents the point at which the site has loaded enough of the information for it to be able to handle a user’s first input. For example, if the site has not loaded enough relevant information, the user might tap elements or scroll down but nothing will happen.

 

Time to Interactive is the next level, the one at which the website is fully interactive. This means that everything has loaded in the device’s memory and is now ready to be used.

 

Max Potential First Input Delay is the delay a user experiences from the point at which they interact with the browsers to the point at which the browser responds. This is the only performance metric which doesn’t affect the page speed score.

 

 

Opportunities & Diagnostics

 

The opportunities section provides information on what you can improve on your site. It also tells you an estimate of how much each issue affects your load time and how you should prioritize your tasks.

 

Going through each and everyone of them would be overkill. However, under each metric you’ll have a small arrow which you can use to expand the section.

 

PageSpeed Opportunities & Diagnostics

 

There you will find information about each and every recommendation and how to fix the issue to improve your site’s speed. You will notice that the elements which cause the biggest issues are, in general, images and 3rd party scripts.

 

The Passed Audits section is the list of things that you already do well on your web page. Basically, it will show elements from both the Opportunities and Diagnostics sections that fit within Google’s parameters.

 

The more you have in this list, the better!

 

How Is the PageSpeed Insights Score Calculated?

 

Although you might see so many things in the PageSpeed Insights Tool, the score is actually calculated using only the seconds in the Lab Data section. If you read closely, you’ll actually be able to see the message “These metrics don’t directly affect the Performance score.” under Opportunities & Diagnostics.

 

The metrics in the Lab Data are called performance metrics. There are 6 of them and we’ve presented them above. Each metric gets a score from 0 to 100. Each metric has a different weight in calculating the score.

 

3 – First contentful paint
1 – First meaningful paint
2 – First cpu idle
5 – Time to interactive
4 – Speed index
0 – Estimated input latency

 

By order of importance, they are listed as such: Time to Interactive, Speed Index, First Contentful Paint, First CPU Idle, First Meaningful Paint and Estimated Input Latency, which actually has no effect on the score.

 

The scores are based on Log-normal distribution algorithms so let’s not get too deep down the rabbit hole. If you want to learn more you can read this page.

 

Google has also put a Sheet file which you can use to see how the score is actually generated. If you know Excel functions, you can reverse engineer how everything works. You can download this file here, but you have to make your own copy (File -> Make your own copy) before you can edit it. There’s also a version for Lighthouse v5.

 

PageSpeed Score Calculator

 

To put it in simple terms, the First Contentful Paint impacts the score more than the First Meaningful Paint, and so on.

 

Why? Well, probably because if nothing displays on the screen, the user is more likely to leave your website. If you display… something, you’ll win some time to get the rest of the thing delivered.

 

The scores are ultimately divided into 3 categories, Slow (0-49), Average (50-89) and Good (90-100). Then an average is generated as a final score for your website.

 

Generally, if you’re under 50, you do have some issues that need fixing! But again, don’t sweat it if your site loads in about 3 seconds.

 

Key Points in Improving the PageSpeed Insights Score

 

Everything up there might be a little big hard to digest. We get it. Most probably, you won’t be able to solve everything! We’ve ruled out that it’s not important to get a 100% score. However, here are the key elements that will noticeably make your site load faster.

 

Warning: perform a backup of both your files and your database before engaging in these improvements. They can mess up your website and you have to make sure you can return to a previous version!

 

Server response time

 

The server is something you can’t really improve yourself. You either have a good one or a bad one. To improve it, you would either have to reduce load on it significantly, or improve its hardware, both of which you don’t have control over, unless you own the physical machine.

 

So it’s important to have a good server in the first place. But how do you choose a good server?

 

Well, any hosting company that ranks well on Google should provide decent services. However, it’s up to you to test. Best advice? If you’re mostly focused on local SEO, choose a local server. For example, if most of your audience lives in Italy, choose a server with the datacenter in Italy.

 

If the datacenter is all the way in the US, the information will have to travel a big distance before reaching your target audience.

 

You can always test the hosting provider’s own website with PageSpeed Insights and look for their TTFB (Time To First Byte) or Server Response Time. If it’s in the Passed Audits section, you know you have yourself a good hosting provider.

 

Fast Server TTFB

 

However, it’s better if you know someone that is an actual client of the hosting provider so you can test the speed there.

 

Realistically, the host’s own website will probably be on a dedicated server, while your site will be on a shared hosting package. This means that you will share the computer’s CPU and internet bandwidth with other websites.

 

If you can test a real site from a client, that’s great. You might be able to look through the reviews and find clients or ask the support team to provide one.

 

Image compression

 

In general, images are the biggest problem with websites. They are big and take up a lot to download. 

 

There are two types of issues with the images. The first one is the screen size vs. the actual image size in pixels and the second one is the disk size.

 

Disk Size: The more physical space an image takes on a hard disk or SSD, the more it will take to download. 100 KB will download a lot faster than 1000 KB (1MB). If you have 10 images like that on your blog post, expect your site to load very slow.

 

You can use WP Smush to optimize your images. It’s a plugin that will compress the images without losing any quality. This means that you can shrink a 1000×1000 pixels image from 200 KB to 150 KB without noticing the difference in quality, therefore making it load 25% faster.

 

WP Smush

 

Screen Size: Screen size is the size at which an image is displayed. For example, the image below is being displayed at 300×300 pixels.

 

300x300

 

To make images load faster, you first have to make sure you’re not using an image bigger than it’s going to be displayed. For example, if you have an HTML section that styled with CSS at 300×300 pixels, but you load an 1000×1000 pixels image in the source, you’re losing load time for that 700×700 pixels.

 

That’s because the Browser has to download the 1000×1000 pixels image and then shrink it to 300×300 pixels. This takes more time for both the download and the shrinking process. You can fix this by uploading your images with the same width and height that they will be displayed at.

 

WordPress does this automatically by creating multiple instances of the image when you upload it. That’s why you’ll see that 300×300 or 150×150 suffix at the end of an image file path. That’s why you can choose sizes (Large, Medium, Thumbnail). Although it’s not perfect, especially if you manually resize the image with click and drag, and it takes up more space on your server on the long run, it does help with load speed.

 

Deferring the images is another thing that you can do to improve the load time. This means that you can download them later as the user scrolls down on the web page. There will be a brief moment when the images won’t be visible but they will eventually show up, one after another.

 

This helps the Browsers focus on the important part, the one which the users is viewing at that point.

 

 

There are a multitude of plugins that can help you do that. However, many have bugs or only defer images in certain situations, for example if they are created by WordPress or WooCommerce, but not when created or inserted by less popular plugins.

 

There are certainly plugins for other CMS, such as Joomla or Magento. Just perform a Google search for them. If you’re not on a popular CMS, such as WordPress, deferring images can be done with jQuery, but you’ll most certainly need a developer for it, if you’re not one yourself.

 

Next gen image formats are recommended by Google. They are very useful, especially when loading a website from a mobile device. However, there’s a reason not many people use them yet.

 

Next gen image formats are not yet supported by all major browsers. This means that you’ll need to dynamically serve different formats for different browsers.

 

If you can use a plugin on your CMS that might be easy, but if you’re on a custom platform, you’ll need to develop everything from scratch, which costs a lot. Here’s a list of which browsers support the WebP format.

 

WebP Next Gen Image Format

 

If you size and optimize your images properly, the savings you’ll get by also converting them to next gen image formats such as JPEG2000 or WebP might not be worth the cost in time and money.

 

However, if you have the time and budget, by all means, go do it. You can use this tool to check if the browsers your users spend most time on are supported. Search for either WebP or JPEG2000.

 

HTML & CSS Structure

 

The HTML structure of your web page dictates the way it loads. Browsers read a page from the top to the bottom and they load the elements the same way. This means that if you want something to load first, you have to put it higher in your page.

 

Generally, the issues are not with HTML but with CSS. If you write your CSS chaotically, it will result in a slower loading time and a bad user experience.

 

Let’s take an example. Most websites, if not all, follow this HTML structure: head > body > footer.

 

If my CSS file styles the footer first, then the footer will receive the styling, although it is before the fold. Meanwhile, the header and body might remain plain.

 

It’s also a good idea to add your mobile styling first, as mobile devices are the slowest ones.

 

The same goes with renderblocking JavaScript. Postpone scripts that are not vital. Add them to the footer so that they will be loaded last.

 

However, if you have important scripts such as Analytics which should run as soon as possible, then by all means keep them in the header and make sure they fire and run properly, even though this might result in a lower PageSpeed score.

 

Minification & Script Compression

 

Minification is a process of making a file smaller by removing unnecessary information from it.

 

For example, when writing JavaScript and CSS, most, if not all coders, like to use spaces in order to keep their code clean and easy to read. However, those extra spaces add up, especially if you have a long piece of code.

 

CSS Minification

cssminifier.com

 

Another way of minifying code would be by combining similar elements.

 

For example, if my head and footer sections were identical, instead of writing them like this:

 

body {
font-size: 16px;
}
footer {
font-size: 16px;
}

 

I could write:

 

body, footer {
font-size: 16px;
}

 

Compression is the process of shrinking files by replacing recurring sequences of information with a single reference to that particular sequence.

 

So, for example, if I have the following code: 123 4 123 123 123 4 123 123, I could replace 123 with a 1 and get a compressed version like this one: 1 4 1 1 1 4 1 1. Of course, it’s far more complex than what I’ve presented.

 

This generally happens on the server side and the most common one is called Gzip compression. The server sends a compressed version. After the browser receives the compressed file, it decompresses it by reversing the process, to read its actual contents.

 

This works pretty much like WinRAR; we probably all know it, because we’ve been using it for free since forever!

 

If you’re on a popular CMS, you will definitely find a plugin for both compression and minification. For example, the W3 Total Cache plugin does a lot of things including both of these, if you set it up properly.

 

Remember that compression is dependent on server setup. If your server does not support Gzip, you won’t be able to compress files. If you have an Apache server, make sure you have mod_deflate installed.

 

You can ask your server provider if your hosting supports it. 99.9% of the time they will say yes. If it’s not already installed, they should do it free of charge, as it’s something pretty basic.

 

If you’re not on a popular CMS you can also enable Gzip compression via the .htaccess file (Apache servers) by adding the following code, as long as mod_deflate is installed.

 

<span class="token operator">&lt;</span>IfModule mod_deflate<span class="token punctuation">.</span>c<span class="token operator">&gt;</span>
  <span class="token shell-comment comment"># Compress HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Text, XML and fonts</span>
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>javascript
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>rss<span class="token operator">+</span>xml
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>vnd<span class="token punctuation">.</span>ms<span class="token operator">-</span>fontobject
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>x<span class="token operator">-</span>font
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>x<span class="token operator">-</span>font<span class="token operator">-</span>opentype
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>x<span class="token operator">-</span>font<span class="token operator">-</span>otf
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>x<span class="token operator">-</span>font<span class="token operator">-</span>truetype
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>x<span class="token operator">-</span>font<span class="token operator">-</span>ttf
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>x<span class="token operator">-</span>javascript
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>xhtml<span class="token operator">+</span>xml
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> application<span class="token operator">/</span>xml
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> font<span class="token operator">/</span>opentype
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> font<span class="token operator">/</span>otf
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> font<span class="token operator">/</span>ttf
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> image<span class="token operator">/</span>svg<span class="token operator">+</span>xml
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> image<span class="token operator">/</span>x<span class="token operator">-</span>icon
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> text<span class="token operator">/</span>css
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> text<span class="token operator">/</span>html
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> text<span class="token operator">/</span>javascript
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> text<span class="token operator">/</span>plain
  AddOutputFilterByType <span class="token constant">DEFLATE</span> text<span class="token operator">/</span>xml

  <span class="token shell-comment comment"># Remove browser bugs (only needed for really old browsers)</span>
  BrowserMatch <span class="token operator">^</span>Mozilla<span class="token operator">/</span><span class="token number">4</span> gzip<span class="token operator">-</span>only<span class="token operator">-</span>text<span class="token operator">/</span>html
  BrowserMatch <span class="token operator">^</span>Mozilla<span class="token operator">/</span><span class="token number">4</span><span class="token punctuation">.</span><span class="token number">0</span><span class="token punctuation">[</span><span class="token number">678</span><span class="token punctuation">]</span> no<span class="token operator">-</span>gzip
  BrowserMatch <span class="token package">bMSIE</span> <span class="token operator">!</span>no<span class="token operator">-</span>gzip <span class="token operator">!</span>gzip<span class="token operator">-</span>only<span class="token operator">-</span>text<span class="token operator">/</span>html
  Header append Vary User<span class="token operator">-</span>Agent
<span class="token operator">&lt;</span><span class="token operator">/</span>IfModule<span class="token operator">&gt;</span>

 

Sometimes, you can also combine the scripts. There are plugins that do this, such as Autoptimize, which I’ve presented before. Combining scripts is exactly what it says. Instead of having two files, you combine them into one. This way there’s only one request made to the server, instead of multiple ones.

 

However, combining scripts can many times causes bugs, so make sure you back up everything before.

 

Cache Policy

 

Caching is the process of storing files in a client’s browser in order to be able to quickly access them at a later time.

 

For example, if a user comes to your website for the first time, your logo will have to be downloaded. However, if you have an effective caching policy, that file will be stored in the user’s browser. When the user accesses your site a second time, it won’t have to download that file again as it will be instantly loaded from their computer.

 

Dynamic Elements (short cache policy): Dynamic elements are elements on your website that change frequently. For example, you might keep adding new posts in a slider on the Homepage.

 

In this case, the HTML is the dynamic element, so set a short caching policy if this fits you. 30 minutes might be enough, just in case the user returns to that page in the same session.

 

In some cases, you might not want to cache those elements at all, if promptitude is what matters for your users, such as on news websites.

 

Static Resources (long cache policy): Static resources are files that rarely change. These are usually images and CSS or JS files, but they can also be audio files, video files, etc.

 

You can set a longer cache time for images and CSS files since you know you will not be changing them very frequently. You can even go up to one year, but 3 months is usually enough.

 

Third Party Tools: You don’t really have control over 3rd party tools, so if you feel like a tool that is hosted elsewhere makes your website run very slow, better find an alternative or give up on it.

 

A solution would be to host the files on your own server and cache them. However, this might not be very productive and it’s not recommended, as you’ll have to constantly update those files as soon as new versions come out, otherwise the tool or app won’t work properly.

 

Cache Plugins: There are a lot of plugins that will properly handle the cache protocols required for a good user experience. If you’re on WordPress, one of these plugins is W3 Total Cache. However, if you want to go for a better option, WP Rocket is also pretty popular, but it will set you back a couple hundred bucks.

 

Just search for cache plugin / extension / module + your platform on Google to find what you need. Look at the reviews to pick the best one.

 

.htaccess file cache: You can also set a cache control header from your .htaccess file on an Apache server, if you don’t run your website on a popular CMS.

 

There are multiple ways:

 

## EXPIRES CACHING ##
<IfModule mod_expires.c>
ExpiresActive On
ExpiresByType image/jpg "access 1 year"
ExpiresByType image/jpeg "access 1 year"
ExpiresByType image/gif "access 1 year"
ExpiresByType image/png "access 1 year"
ExpiresByType text/css "access 1 month"
ExpiresByType text/html "access 1 hour"
ExpiresByType application/pdf "access 1 month"
ExpiresByType text/x-javascript "access 1 month"
ExpiresByType application/x-shockwave-flash "access 1 month"
ExpiresByType image/x-icon "access 1 year"
ExpiresDefault "access 1 month"
</IfModule>
## EXPIRES CACHING ##

 

Or you can also use this code:

 

# One year for image files
<filesMatch ".(jpg|jpeg|png|gif|ico)$">
Header set Cache-Control "max-age=31536000, public"
</filesMatch>

# One month for css and js
<filesMatch ".(css|js)$">
Header set Cache-Control "max-age=2628000, public"
</filesMatch>

 

The numbers in the max-age attribute are in seconds, so 3600 would mean one hour, 86400 one day and so on.

 

Resetting the cache: When you make modifications to a web page, you want to reset the cache if an older version has been cached previously. However, you can only reset the cache on your server.

 

This means that users who have downloaded a previous version of a certain file will still load that old version from their computer when they access the website again. The file will be refreshed after the set amount of time in your caching policy or if the user manually resets their browser cache.

 

If you have a critical error in your web design or code, you can change the filename of your file. This way you can be sure that the cache for that particular file will be reset.

 

Sometimes, Chrome’s cache can be difficult to reset. Sometimes, routers and datacenters between the client and the server might also cache files so, if you don’t see the modifications, give it a couple of hours.

 

Lightweight Theme & Plugins

 

The more you load your website with plugins, the heavier it gets and the slower it runs.

 

A website’s theme is the biggest ‘plugin’ the site has. Most themes out there come with heavy 3rd party builders and huge libraries of plugins which all make the site run slower.

 

Lightweight Theme & Plugin

 

For example, slider plugins generally add the slider JS code to all pages, although it will probably be used only on the homepage or a landing page. That’s some heavy code to be loading on every page! Not to mention that nobody likes them and they lower the conversion rate.

 

So when you’re looking for a theme, try to find one without too much animations, sliders, functions and so on. If you look at the big websites you’ll see that, in general, they’re pretty simple.

 

A good theme which I recommend is GeneratePress. It’s lightweight and will load very fast. You can enable or disable elements to keep your site as clean as possible.

 

Combining it with an optimization plugin such as WP Rocket (paid) or a combo of free plugins such as Autoptimize + Fastest Cache will make it blazing fast! You can also use W3 Total Cache, a plugin which does almost everything listed above pretty well.

 

When you install new plugins, think about how important they are to your website. After you install them, test your score and loading speed. Does the plugin make your site run slower? If yes, is it critical to keep the plugin? Maybe look for a better alternative or remove it completely.

 

How to Bulk Check the PageSpeed Insights Score

 

The annoying part about PageSpeed Insights is that it checks only one web page at a time. It would take an eternity to check all the pages on your website, depending on its size.

 

However, there’s a way of bulk checking the PageSpeed Insights Score. Have you guessed it yet?

 

It’s the CognitiveSEO Tool Site Audit. Once you set up the technical SEO analysis with the Site Audit, go to your Campaign -> Site Audit -> Performance -> PageSpeed.

 

Bulk Check Google PageSpeed Insights Score

 

Of course, you can do a lot more with the tool, from improving your technical SEO and content to monitoring your rankings and link building efforts.

 

There’s also a somewhat free alternative which is a Chrome Extension. However, what it will actually do is ask for a list of URLs and then just open them as new tabs in the online PageSpeed Insights tool.

 

Bulk Check PageSpeed Extension Chrome

 

This means that the process is OK for about 10-20 tabs, if you have a medium to high end computer CPU. Anymore than that and the browser could crash or you’ll grow old waiting. It’s still pretty inconvenient.

 

Other SEO Tools for Measuring & Improving Site Speed

 

Of course, Google’s PageSpeed Insights tool isn’t the only tool to check and improve page speed. For once, we don’t really know where the tests are being performed from. If your site is hosted on a server in Europe and Google performs its tests from the US, it’s natural that the site will be slower.

 

However, there are tools which specify where the test is being performed from.

 

Pingdom

 

Pingdom Speed Test is a great tool which measures the speed at which your web page loads. Once the test is done, you’ll get some results which are similar to the ones on Google’s tool, at least visually.

 

Pingdom Speed Test

 

What’s interesting about it is that you can select where the test is going to be performed from. Sure, the options are limited, but it’s still better than not even knowing it.

 

If you focus on local SEO, choose the location closest to your server. If you don’t know where it’s actually hosted, ask your hosting provider and you’ll find out.

 

Pingdom Data Center Location

 

It’s also a good idea to make multiple tests from different locations, just in case you have an international audience.

 

GT-Metrix

 

GT Metrix has been one of my favorite speed testing tools out there. Although it tests only from Vancouver, Canada, the insights it gives are very useful.

 

GT Metrix Speed Tool

 

Quick tip: If you create a free account with them, you won’t have to wait so much for the test to be performed. To reduce load on their servers, they add you in a queue when there are too many requests. However, registered users have priority.

 

mod_pagespeed

 

The mod_pagespeed is a server addon from Google. Its purpose is to fix any page speed related issues at a core level, directly on the server side. This means that even if you add unoptimized images, mod_pagespeed will automatically compress, optimize and convert them to next gen image formats.

 

However, installing mod_pagespeed is definitely more technical than just dealing with everything in WordPress.

 

If your server already has it or you know what you’re doing go ahead and install it. However, it’s always a better idea to have a fast site in the first place instead of trying to cover things up.

 

Any way, this mod will increase load on your server as every time you upload an unoptimized image, it will have to use processing power to convert it.

 

Google AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages)

 

If you want your site to be really fast on mobile searches, you can always implement Google AMP.

 

Google AMP or Accelerated Mobile Pages is a special type of HTML, stripped of heavy, slower loading elements.

 

More than that, AMP pages will preload in Chrome mobile browser as the user scrolls through the search results, resulting in an instant load of the page when the user taps the title.

 

Google AMP

 

There are also disadvantages, of course. You’re limited from every direction, although things are getting better and better every day. Also, your site’s design has to suffer and will pretty much look like any other site that uses AMP. Bummer.

 

The URL isn’t yours either, because Google loads a cached version of your site, on their URLs. However, Google developers have promised to bring native URLs into AMP.

 

On WordPress and other CMS, you can add AMP to your website through a plugin. For custom websites, you’ll need to get in touch with your developer and give them this link.

 

Conclusion

 

Improving your site speed is important for better search rankings. PageSpeed Insights provides a set of best practices and possible improvements, prioritized by their impact on your site’s speed.

 

While the score itself shouldn’t concern you too much, it’s a good idea to try and get it at least over 50. However, focus on load time, which is measured in seconds. A good website should load in about 3 seconds. A really, really fast one should load in about 1.

 

Having a good server, compressing images and keeping things clean and simple in your code will benefit you the most when it comes to website speed.

 

What’s your PageSpeed Insights Score? Have you seen better rankings after improving the loading speed of your website? Share your experience with us in the comments section below!

The post How Page Speed Affects SEO & Google Rankings | The 2019 Page Speed Guide appeared first on SEO Blog | cognitiveSEO Blog on SEO Tactics & Strategies.

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