SEO Articles

How To Pick a WordPress Theme

Once you’ve finished creating your website, choosing a theme will be the next task on your checklist. Thousands of them exist on the market today. This can make finding the correct one a daunting task. Luckily for you, I’ve created a simple guide that is going to break down the process into a simple, step-by-step process.

First things first, what type of website did you create? Is it a simple blog, company page, online shop, app portfolio, or something not listed here? You always want to choose a theme that’s related to your niche.

For example, a blog about cats can get away with a basic theme. The blog will not need any fancy sliders or extra functionality.

Another example includes Apple.com. This website includes sliders, sales pages, videos, credit card forms, and artistic images. Obviously, you will not need a website with all of these features unless you have several products to sell. Try to keep it as simple as possible.


What Works Best, a Free or Premium Theme?

For most beginner sites (see the cat blog example above), a free theme will suffice. You can find hundreds of them in the WordPress Theme Directory. All themes in the directory are quality controlled by WordPress. This will ensure that they contain no malware and make the use of proper development techniques.

Please exercise caution with free themes outside of the WordPress directory as some contain malware and other issues. Most free themes will be an excellent choice for your website. Just make they stay updated and include some level of support behind them. Sites without frequent updates and support will make your site vulnerable to malware.

If you want to take your site to the next level, you’ll need to spend a little extra money on a premium theme. What separates premium themes from free themes? Firstly, most free themes will force you to give a backlink in the footer. This removes an element of professionalism from your website. Secondly, the chances are that someone else will be using the same theme which will prevent your site from standing out. These are not big issues, but they will be something to think about once you start gaining more traffic.

The primary benefits of premium themes are better support, more customization options, faster updates, and visually appealing designs. Almost everything in a theme’s framework is improved when you upgrade to premium offerings.

Basically, it is up to you to determine which option suits you and your website best. My rule of thumb is to stick with basic themes and upgrade to more complex themes in the future if your site requires it.


Why Responsive Design is a Must

What is a responsive design? Responsive design optimizes your website’s layout for the smaller displays of mobile devices. Responsive designs remove the need to zoom, scroll left and right, and press small links. Responsive design is a requirement if you want your website to be accessible by all people on the internet.

Since mobile users now represent a large amount of traffic, you could be losing a sizable readership if your theme is not responsive. Most themes are responsive by default nowadays, but a few are still behind the times. You’ll be able to tell if they are responsive usually in their description.

Wondering if your current theme is responsive? If so, you can perform a Google search for “mobile theme test” and find a website that’ll test your theme on multiple screen resolutions.
How To Pick a WordPress Theme

Google and other search engines are now identifying which websites are mobile and which ones are not. You can find out if a site is mobile-friendly by searching for the website on a mobile device.

Will a mobile optimized website help me rank better in Google? As always, figuring out Google’s algorithms is not an exact science. It is hard to determine if this will increase your rankings on mobile devices. Nonetheless, I do believe that people will be more likely to click on mobile-friendly search results over results that don’t make the use of responsive design.


What about Support?

Having a support team behind you is a must. Issues occasionally arise in themes that cannot be fixed unless you have experienced in web design. There’s nothing more frustrating than dealing with a broken theme. Going back to the free vs. premium debate, support is usually going to be faster and more reliable on the premium end. Groups that provide support within 24 hours or less are preferred. Anything longer will keep you “stuck” trying to fix issues.


Are Memberships Worth It?

Memberships give you unlimited access to all their themes (and sometimes plugins). While it may sound like a great offer, why would you need unlimited themes for just one website? I recommend choosing one theme and using it until the design gets stale or extra functionality is required. Unless your theme is completely unusable or outdated, your web users will not put too much value in your theme design. Ultimately, it will be the content that counts. Changing your theme too often will result in wasted time that could have been spent making content.

For instance, you could design the prettiest website in the world and still get no traffic without content. On the contrary, you could have a very basic theme and still receive high amounts of traffic as long as your content is interesting. The key point here is not to get caught in having the latest and greatest design. Websites that puts an emphasis your content will do just fine.

Now don’t get me wrong, memberships can be a great thing, especially if you own multiple sites and would like to use different themes on them. Just don’t get caught up in paying for expensive monthly or yearly memberships that you probably don’t need.


Too Many Functions?

Don’t worry about buying a theme with “100s of features” unless you actually need them. Many developers are guilty of stuffing their themes with features that the average user will not need. There’s nothing worse than buying a highly complex theme for your simple blog and not knowing how to use it. Not only that, these themes tend to be poorly optimized and can bring your site to a crawl when it receives high loads of traffic. It is best to stay away from these themes unless you absolutely need their features.


Use Caution With Big Directories

I recommend using caution with big directories like ThemeForest, Mojo Themes, and others. Since almost anyone can add themes to most directories, quality control is somewhat of an issue. I’ve used many themes from ThemeForest that are full of issues due to the feature “stuffing” I mentioned above.


Page Speed

Optimizing your website for page speed is very important. Have you ever clicked on a webpage only to wait 5 seconds for it to load and then decide to press back? Preferably, you are going to want a theme that loads in less than 5 seconds. People’s attention spans are short, and you’ll want to ensure that you capture it before they get bored and leave your site.

Testing a site’s page speed and optimization is easy. You can head over to GTmetrix and type in a link to a theme’s demo. I ran a test on WealthyAffiliate.com (an excellent source for affiliate marketing) and received performance scores around 85% on average. Anything above 80% is considered good; anything above 90% is considered excellent. The page loaded in around 2.5 seconds. This is fast and achieves the modern standard.

How To Pick a WordPress Theme


What Do the Reviews Say?

This is an important question to ask when deciding if a theme is worth purchasing. Don’t just read the 5-star ratings. Take notes from the lower ratings as well. Do not waste your hard-earned cash on broken themes.


SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

This is not a big deal when it comes to choosing a theme. Search engine optimization takes care of simple formatting for your site in search engine results. Even if the theme is not entirely optimized, you can find plenty of plugins that’ll optimize your website for search engines. You do not need to find the perfect theme for SEO as long as the basics are included.


Is It Worth the Price?

Most premium themes will run around $45-70. I do not recommend spending over $100 unless the theme has extra functionality that cannot be found elsewhere.


Some Tips and Tricks

Add WordPress Tags to Your WordPress Theme

A couple of weeks ago the WordPress community was blessed with the latest release from the WordPress team, now known as WordPress. One of the included features was an extremely important and extremely useful one, which adds built-in tags to WordPress.

If you have already upgraded to WordPress and want to take advantage of this new feature, you will probably have to manually add this tagging feature to your theme. In order to add tags, you simply need to paste the following code where you want to display the tags:

<?php the_tags(); ?>

This will actually add the text “Tags:” before the output of tags, so you will not need to do this manually. If you would like to proudly display your tags in a cloud somewhere (most commonly in your sidebar), you can easily do so by using the following code:

<?php wp_tag_cloud(‘smallest=8&largest=36&’); ?>

This code tells WordPress to display your tags in alphabetical order with the smallest text being 8-point font and the largest font is 36-point font. You can adjust the font sizes to your preference.

If you would prefer to stick with the Ultimate Tagging Warrior plugin, the author has stated that the plugin will be updated to work with WordPress. Most people, though, would probably prefer to switch to the new built-in tagging system. If you’d like to make the switch from UTW to the new WordPress tagging system, WordPress has made it easy to make the conversion with their import feature. You can find the import option under the Manage tab in your Dashboard. In addition to the ability to import your UTW tags, WordPress also allows you to import tags from other plugins such as Bunny’s Technorati Tags and the Simple Tagging plugin.


Creating a Two-Tiered Navigation Menu

If you’ve been following the recent trends with premium WordPress themes, you’ve probably noticed that the two-tiered navigation menu has become extremely popular. An example of this is the popular Revolution WordPress themes. This style of menu can be used in a variety of ways, but the most common seems to be to display your children pages in a menu below your blog’s parent pages.

If you’ve wondered how to hack your existing WordPress theme to accomplish something along these lines, here is the PHP you’ll need:

<ul id=”nav”>
<?php wp_list_pages(‘title_li=&depth=1’); ?>
</ul>
<?php if($post->post_parent)
$children = wp_list_pages(“title_li=&child_of=”.$post->post_parent.”&echo=0″); else
$children = wp_list_pages(“title_li=&child_of=”.$post->ID.”&echo=0″);
if ($children) { ?>
<ul id=”subnav”>
<?php echo $children; ?>
</ul>
<?php } else { ?>
<?php } ?>

Once you’ve got the code in place, you’ll want to style it to look the way you want it to. 


Tell WordPress to Function Like a CMS

So, you have an established WordPress blog, but you’ve seen the pro bloggers doing it and now you want to turn that blog into a Content Management System (CMS)? Many people probably weren’t aware of this trick (including many web developers), but one neat feature added with WordPress was the ability to have a different home and blog page without needing to install WordPress on a completely new directory.

In order to accomplish this, you first need to make sure that the page that you want to be your blog’s homepage is named home.php. This will be the page displayed at the root of your domain.

Next, you’ll want to create a new file named blog.php and place the following code within the file:

<?php
/*
Template Name: Blog
*/
// Which page of the blog are we on?
$paged = get_query_var(‘paged’);
query_posts(‘cat=-0&paged=’.$paged);
// make posts print only the first part with a link to rest of the post.
global $more;
$more = 0;
//load index to show blog
load_template(TEMPLATEPATH . ‘/index.php’);
?>

That is all you need for code in that file. Upload it to your theme. This code creates a loop of your index.php file in your theme (commonly used as the single post page) and displays it as a typical blog homepage. Because this page will pull from your index.php file, going forward, any changes you make to your index.php file will update on this page as well.

Now, go into your dashboard and create a new page called Blog. Then select the Blog file you just created in the Page Template drop-down menu in the right sidebar.

Once that is done, the last thing you need to do is go over to your permalink structure page (under Manage) and add /blog/ to your custom permalink structure. This means if you are using an optimal permalink structure, you would want to use a custom structure of /blog/%postname%/. If you are doing this to an established blog, you can easily use the Permalink Redirect plugin to redirect your old permalink structure to the new one.


Conclusion

Choosing a theme is not complicated once you know what you are searching for. To make the process easier, I’ve provided these tips for you to follow.

The post How To Pick a WordPress Theme appeared first on WP Fix It.

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What’s powering conversational search? Featured snippets, structured data and actions

Voice search is still hot, but it might be a little slower on the uptake than many predicted. Google and friends continue to bombard the consumer with new devices, with new possibilities and new ways of controlling them via voice. The results for these voice searches comes from a mix of actions, knowledge graph data and featured snippets. But, there’s a new data layer forming, slowly powering more and more parts of the voice experience. It’s a technology we’ve talked a bit quite often here at Yoast: structured data.

Voice is still coming, but maybe not as fast as expected

When the rise of virtual assistants started, many welcomed it as a new world order. Some predicted that by 2020, more than half of the searches would be voice activated. That was probably a bit optimistic. While adoption is still growing and big tech is pushing voice technology like there’s no tomorrow, it still feels like critical mass is off some ways.

Almost every new product announced by Google, Facebook, Amazon etc has an assistant on board. Take Bluetooth headphones for instance, almost every new one that hits the market these days has a voice assistant built in. The industry really wants everyone to talk to their devices. But, Google doesn’t think the future will be purely voice-driven. For many things, people will need a screen. A recent study by Google revealed that 50% of interactions combine voice and touch. 

Voice is two-pronged

It’s good to keep in mind that so-called voice search consists of two main parts:

  • Searching the web with your voice
  • Performing actions with your voice

Working on your voice search strategy, means you have to make a distinction between these parts. For many companies, building an action — “Ok Google, turn on the lights” — doesn’t make much sense. Searching the web, answering questions and guiding people with your content, does make sense. You’re looking to go into a conversation with your audience.

Searching the web with your voice

As mentioned before, for most site owners, the search part of conversational search is where it’s at. This is about using your voice to get search results and answers to your questions. This is also where you can work with your regular content, without having to invest loads of money into an unproven voice strategy based on building a conversational interface. Let’s take a look.

Search results get its data from:

Where do those search results come from once you ask your assistant to look something up for you? That depends on the question you’re asking and which assistant you are using. If we take Google as an example, we can break it down into three pieces:

  • Factual data: answer boxes powered by knowledge graph
  • More complex, general searches: Featured snippets
  • From Google’s own properties (local pack, maps, flights, shopping etc.)

If you ask: “Ok Google, how tall is the Eiffel Tower” you’ll get a nice voice result telling you “the Eiffel Tower is 324 meters tall”. This is all coming from the knowledge graph — the network of facts that Google has formed over the years. This is information Google can rely on for direct answers.

For more complex questions, Google often looks at the results it shows in featured snippets. A piece of content that appears as a featured snippet is proven to be a good result by Google. Of course, it is not infallible and sometimes you can find better results. But in general, if you have a featured snippet for a term/question/problem your content is the number one candidate for being spoken by a voice assistant. 

Ask Google: “Ok Google, what is a meta description” and it’ll speak out loud the featured snippets that Yoast has earned for that question. Try it! Of course, these results do change from time to time, but we’ve had this featured snippet for quite a while.

Here’s a recording Joost made of that query a while back

The third one encompasses all the answers to questions or queries that Google can fill from their own properties, like the local pack for local results, or Google Flights. Things tend to blur here quickly, as many Google-owned queries are turned into actions. So if you want to book a flight, that will trigger an action and not a search.

For most sites and types of content, the best chance of getting your content in voice assistants is via featured snippets. To get featured snippets, you need authority, a good reputation and awesome content. If you are already ranking on page one for your queries or phrases, you have a good chance at getting that coveted featured snippet! 

Since the launch of the BERT update, Google has a much better understanding language and can figure out complex, long-tail searches. This means that the search engine will come up with results that better match the search query. Google explicitly states that it uses BERT for featured snippets, so you have to keep that in mind. 

Of course, BERT is not infallible. It is a very sophisticated language model, but still only a model. It helps computers improve their understanding of language, but it won’t turn a computer into a human so to say. So everything comes down to readability! 

To maximise your chance at getting featured snippets, think of this: 

  • Do keyword research
  • Look at what’s ranking now and improve on that
  • Prioritize! Don’t try to get them all — only the ones where you can help your users with better content than your competitors
  • Check the user intent of the searches and match it to answers 
  • Use Answer the Public or Also Asked to find questions to answer 
  • Use easy to digest, simple to understand language
  • Keep your answers short and snappy
  • Speak your content out loud — or let your computer do it
  • Mark up your content with structured data (although not needed for featured snippets)
  • In general: make better content!

It’s a great sport to hunt for featured snippet opportunities and they can bring in awesome results, even with voice search.

Doesn’t Schema power featured snippets?

In the list above, you see I’ve mentioned structured data in relation to featured snippets. There’s a question that pops up regularly: does Google use structured data for ranking featured snippets? Your favorite Googlers have debunked this a number of times. 

At the moment, structured data is used for a lot of things, but not for featured snippets. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t add it to your pages — you should, because structured data makes your page a lot easier to understand for search engines —, but it’s not essential in getting those features snippets. Getting on page one with brilliant content is.

Performing actions with your voice

While getting featured snippets helps to get your content spoken out loud by voice assistants, having Schema is not. But this is not the end of the story. We see Schema popping up in ever more places, and one of those places is your smart assistant. Schema does power some voice-based actions — at least on Google. Google now lets you build actions based on your news, how-tos, FAQs, recipes and podcasts. 

Your structured data can be the starting point for voice actions

Google lets you build actions for assistants

Google uses so-called actions to find and present content that users can interact with on smart devices with the Assistant. You can build your own actions, so assistants can respond with your specific content. Building those, however, can require a lot of custom work and, therefore, probably not a viable option for many site owners. 

Luckily, Google also provides a much easier way to get particular pieces of web content ready for smart devices: the structured data found on your site. Yet another sign that Schema structured data is here to stay. 

Actions let you get something done using the Assistant

By adding structured data to your site, you’ll not only get a chance at rich results, but this enables Google to automatically generate actions for their Assistant. Talk about two birds with one stone. At the moment, of the dozens of supported Schema properties, Google can generate actions for five datatypes: FAQs, how-tos, news, podcasts and recipes. The first two were only recently announced.

Smart displays combine voice and screen to guide people — in this case a visual how-to

Of course, there are some caveats. For news content, for instance, Google only admits content built by publishers who already participate in Google News. FAQs and how-tos only work on smart displays, with the latter being in a developer preview and, therefore, not yet available for the general public. If you want, you can always sign up to register your interest if you want to start building right now.

Structured data needs minimal adjustments

Adding the necessary code isn’t too hard if you’ve already invested in Schema markup. There is a distinction between required and recommended properties. Sometimes, Google will nag you into adding more to make errors go away. Fully formed structured data might enhance your chance at getting rich results — or having the Assistant pull up your actions.

For some data types, you must add specific pieces of structured data to get a chance to appear on smart displays. If we look at recipes, for instance, you’ll notice recipeIngredient and recipeInstructions are recommended for rich results, but required for getting guidance on smart displays. But, if you’re looking to build a full recipe structured data implementation, you would add this anyway, right?

Adding valid How-to and FAQ Schema is easy with the structured data content blocks in Yoast SEO. Simply open a post in the WordPress block editor and add the block. Fill it with relevant content and you’re good to go!

Simply fill in the fields to build a how-to with valid structured data

Keep a close eye at the example code and the necessary properties. Google tends to change these regularly. And keep in mind that documentation and testing tools might not always be on the same page. Last thing you have to remember: you have no guarantee that your structured data leads to rich results, as the search engines decide on that.

Speakable Schema

Another relatively new addition to Schema is the speakable property. This is not an action built to let people interact with your content, but a way to tell Google which part of the page is fit for audio-playback. This used to work for Google News content in the US only, but Google recently opened it up for other types of content. If set up right, you’ll notice Google Assistant reads your content aloud, attributes it and sends the complete URL to your device. It is currently in beta, but should turn out to be a great way to help machines find out what they can read or not.

The value of voice for site owners

There’s a lot happening at the moment. The technologies powering voice search are giving search engines a better understanding of how humans communicate. They can use those insights to improve their search results to provide you with better answers to your questions. Plus, it allows them to develop new applications that help you do your job. That’s great, but how valuable is voice for a ‘regular’ type site? 

For most sites, having an elaborate voice strategy is not viable. It isn’t very cost effective to build actions for every type of assistant and hope for the best. Having a strategy for getting and keeping featured snippets is important. This is based on content you have — or can produce — and has the added bonus of working in two locations at one: search and voice.

In addition, there’s a new focus on structured data providing data for voice assistants — at least on Google. With Google pushing structured data so hard, it won’t come as a surprise if we see a lot more of this happening in the next year. For Google, Schema structured data provides a context layer of the web. Bringing the knowledge graph, language processing and computer vision into the mix, Google is well on its way to understand the world.

Conclusion

In this article, I showed a number of ways search engines like Google provide answers for their voice assistants. Now, you have a better understanding of the value of voice and the things you have to keep in mind when you want to set up a voice search strategy.

The post What’s powering conversational search? Featured snippets, structured data and actions appeared first on Yoast.

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5 Reasons to Avoid “Affordable” SEO Services

Falling for the “affordable” SEO services trap will wreck your business.

I don’t want that to happen to you!

This guide will explain why you need to avoid these services (and what to look for).

Then, I’ll show you what you can do if you have a limited SEO budget.

Let’s jump in.

Need SEO help? Secure your free SEO diagnosis today so you can explode your company with SEO this year.

What is Affordable SEO?

Everyone has their own perception what “affordable” means. For example, let’s say your business is generating millions in revenue every year. Then, $5,000 per month may seem affordable to you. If your company is making below six figures, then $5,000 per month would seem ludicrous. It’s all subjective.

There is one element of this argument that is true:

Good SEO isn’t cheap.

Let me show 5 reasons why hiring an affordable Search Engine Optimization company isn’t a good idea.

1. You Can’t Do Much Without Money

There are only so many actions you can take on a low SEO budget. The only actions you can take are those that are time-dependent and not capital-dependent.

Some time-dependent SEO actions include keyword research, page-level optimization, and some technical optimization. I say “some” technical optimization because you may need a developer for larger issues. Developers cost money.

With that said, you won’t get far with keyword research, optimizing pages, and doing some technical optimization.

It’s better than nothing. But, those are not the high impact activities that drive organic search growth.

The two biggest drivers of growth are content and backlinks. These two activities are also the most capital-intensive.

This is the point where affordable SEO services break down.

Since affordable SEO companies don’t have the capital, they:

  • can’t create quality content
  • can’t spend time doing link outreach
  • can’t pay for placement on quality sites

This results in two things:

1. They have to go cheap on SEO content creation, which will end up embarrassing your brand.

2. They will use gray or black hat backlinks that will get your site penalized.

Here’s the truth:

2. You Will Lose in the Long Run

I get it. You want to squeeze as much profit out of your business as you can. But there are some things in life that you never want to go “cheap” on.

SEO is one of those things.

Think about this way… would you try to find your wife the cheapest engagement ring?

Of course you wouldn’t because you know what the consequences would be.

The cost here is clear: your future wife won’t be happy!

And if you don’t already know this: happy wife = happy life.

Source

Get used to these marriage analogies since I’m married now.

With that out of the way, the cost of working with a cheap SEO company isn’t as black and white as getting your fiance a cheap engagement ring.

The reason is because the “cost” isn’t immediate. It takes months of working with a bad SEO company to realize the cost. This “cost” comes in many different forms.

First, cheap SEO will likely land you a penalty. So, even if the low-quality tactics work in the short-term, you will end up getting nailed later on. If your site gets penalized, you will have to hire another agency just to get the penalty removed. Once your site gets a penalty, it’s a long road to recovery. In fact, your previous traffic levels may never recover.

And these are only the visible costs.

You also have to take into account opportunity and time costs. If your site gets penalized, you will have wasted precious time and capital.

You know the value of time, money, and business assets.

Now here’s another part that stinks if you decide to go the cheap SEO route:

3. You Won’t Get Assets

Quality content and backlinks are ASSETS for your business. This means they will continue to bring your business value for the long-term.

Here’s the bad news:

Affordable SEO services won’t give you any tangible assets. That’s because they do not have the capital to create quality content assets or acquire quality link placements.

4. Scalability = Cookie Cutter

Most affordable Search Engine Optimization companies have to use cookie-cutter strategies. That’s because these companies won’t be able to scale if they have to do any creative work.

SEO is a dynamic skill. While the principles of quality SEO never change, every single campaign is different. Every client is at a different point and will have different needs.

A cookie-cutter approach rarely works and will almost always be low quality.

On top of that, cheap SEO companies will also be unresponsive. That’s because they do not have the time to communicate.

These companies allocate most of their resources to front-end sales. As a result, this leaves little resources for getting your business results. They are fine with a high client churn rate because of their front-end sales model.

Good agencies understand that SEO requires creativity and strategic pivots. No two campaigns are the same.

And unlike scale-based models, quality agencies value client RETENTION. For example, my SEO agency allocates most of our resources to testing and improving our services.

My philosophy is simple: if we focus on improving our service and getting results, then we don’t need to be as aggressive with front-end sales.

Here’s the takeaway on this point:

Most cheap SEO companies focus heavily on front-end sales, which leaves little resources for client fulfillment. Quality agencies allocate most of their resources to getting results and improving their service quality.

5. Experience is Priceless

Companies that offer affordable SEO services have to employ cheap labor. Cheap labor often equals inexperience.

The point is:

Good agencies aren’t cheap because they employ legitimate, proven experts. These experts are confident in their ability to get your business results. Therefore, they would never work for entry-level pay.

Do you know how to spot inexperienced workers in an SEO agency?

Look for any type of bragging about how large their staff is.

A single SEO expert like Brian Dean, Neil Patel, or Ryan Stewart can run circles around entire SEO teams.

Experience, skill and tested strategies and systems are what get SEO results. Not large staffs of entry-level workers.

What Affordable SEO Packages Look Like

It’s pretty easy to identify low-quality SEO services once you know the basics of SEO. Here are a few things to look out for:

Convoluted Proposals (and Full of Fluff)

Cheap agencies take advantage of business owners by injecting technical jargon into their proposals. This is an attempt to make it seem like they are doing a ton of work. In reality, 80% of the tasks they list either A) take a little time to complete and B) will have little or no positive impact on your campaign.

Content and Link Acquisition Get Little Attention

If you don’t see sections for content and link acquisition in an SEO proposal, then stop reading it. Content and backlinks are the two most impactful elements of a successful SEO campaign. If an agency doesn’t know this, then they don’t know how to get you results.

How Much Should You Pay for Quality SEO Services?

This graphic from Moz is a decent guide on SEO pricing. It is outdated and doesn’t factor inflation or the rising costs of SEO campaigns. Just remember, the lower the price, the less they can do and lower the quality will be.

3 Solutions for a Limited SEO Budget

Are you someone who wants to see the benefits of SEO, but have no budget to hire a good agency? That’s okay. There a few solutions to your situation.

1. Do It Yourself

Believe it or not, doing some of the SEO basics is often safer than hiring a cheap SEO agency. This gives you control and you are responsible for the success. It will also force you to learn more about SEO.

At the same time, your business is your baby and you want to do what’s best for it. That’s why you will want to use the safest, and most effective strategies. You can see results from SEO if you have the right guidance. Read, digest, and implement tactics from my blog.

2. Dip Your Toes

Once you understand the structure of an effective SEO strategy, you can start investing in the right components. For example, instead of you having to write content, you can hire a writer.

3. Wait

Don’t make a rash decision and hire an affordable SEO agency. If your budget is tight, then build up funds and wait to hire a quality agency down the road. Plus, there is so much you can do on your own that can help you grow your organic search traffic.

Conclusion

Hiring an SEO agency is an important decision for your business. Don’t take it lightly and most importantly, avoid falling for the “affordable” SEO trap.

Need SEO help? Secure your free SEO diagnosis today so you can explode your company with SEO this year.

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The UK election and SEO games: Search, scandal, and big promises

The UK goes to the polls this week and the governing Conservatives have already made headlines for their online activities. Luke Richards dives into the political battleground that is the Google SERPs – and provides his analysis of the manifesto promises relevant to the digital business community.

As the UK heads towards its third general election in four years, the two main parties – Conservatives and Labour – both seem to agree that investment in digital technologies is crucial to tackling challenges within the economy, the environment, and the country’s working relationship with the rest of the world after Brexit.

Both parties have also invested a significant amount of their marketing budgets in their digital campaigns.

These past few weeks we’ve seen examples of good and downright poor practice when it comes to search engine marketing. We’ve seen varying success in search visibility, online sentiment, and traffic. And the content of the manifestos themselves – for a digital/tech business audience – makes for fascinating reading in light of the challenges I’ve mentioned above.

Here is my analysis.

Search visibility of the manifestos

We are massively lucky in the UK with the amount of transparency and information at our fingertips as we decide who to vote for in elections.

There are bad actors, as we will discover later, but sites such as They Work For You, Vote For Policies, and The Political Compass all help to separate the quality content from the noise. And with just a couple of clicks, we can have immediate access to any manifesto.

Even before we’ve clicked through to the Conservatives’ manifesto landing page, we already know what the party’s central plan is – should they command a majority in the next parliament: “to get Brexit done.”

UK elections Conservatives manifesto landing page SEO meta content
UK elections Conservatives manifesto landing page SEO meta content

The “get Brexit done” mantra is one that is repeated countless times in the manifesto itself. I’d expected that the Conservative SEO team would be looking to get some visibility for this as a keyphrase. But a quick search for this finds the domain languishing only on page two of Google’s SERPs amid much negative press critical of this populist sloganeering.

Interestingly, the Liberal Democrats’ (a right-wing pro-Europe party) are targeting this key phrase as part of their paid search campaign – with their sponsored ads appear in position zero of the SERPs.

Beyond this, there isn’t much more to the search result save for the “vote conservative” call-to-action in the title and the URL. It’s notable for its brevity, leaving much of the rest of the SERPs open to be filled by positive and negative press, including two articles from The Daily Telegraph (a newspaper which previously employed Conservative leader Boris Johnson) and a well-ranked piece by Prospect magazine describing the party as a “threat to human rights”.

At first glance, the Labour party has adhered much better to onsite SEO best practice.

Their site links are well-served by Google. They command much of the SERP real estate and appear very useful to the user.

UK elections Manifesto Labour party Google SERP rich links
UK elections Manifesto Labour party Google SERP rich links

The choice for site links is a little surprising. The link to the “Accessible Manifesto” is a nice touch – showing consideration to web users who have difficulty reading the text. But the other links don’t really relate directly to the key policy points in the document itself such as their Green Industrial Revolution and National Education Service.

The closest the Labour search result has to a call-to-action is – the “be part of our movement – with your email address…” element, but it isn’t massively compelling.  Another misstep is that the PDF for Labour’s 2015 manifesto is still live and ranking well in position four of SERPs, which could quite easily confuse and frustrate users.

Sentiment elsewhere in the SERPs is more nuanced than what we see for the Conservatives. However, again, right-wing newspaper The Daily Telegraph takes position two and three of the SERPs – and although not immediately negative – one can imagine these articles aren’t massively objective after the user is moved to click through (although this content is behind a paywall).

Search traffic comparison

In the battle for search traffic, the Labour manifesto is vastly outperforming the Conservatives.

UK elections - Search traffic comparison showing the Labour Manifesto outperforming the Conservatives
UK elections search traffic comparison showing the Labour Manifesto outperforming the Conservatives

At its peak – shortly after publication at the end of November – the Labour manifesto got three times as much traffic as the Conservative manifesto did when it performed best on November 24th.

The related queries according to Google Trends are illuminating. “Labour manifesto waspi” is clearly the biggest policy point in search terms online. Another breakout keyphrase is “fake labour manifesto” highlighting some of the underhand tactics employed by the Conservatives (as we’ll discuss below).

For the Conservatives, related queries are dominated by long-tail keyphrases that users are typing in to differentiate the new UK Conservative manifesto – “conservative manifesto 2019 UK” from the Canadian equivalent “conservative manifesto 2019 Canada”. Sadly for Prime Minister Johnson, there’s no appearance of “get Brexit done”. Do Google’s users actually care about this policy? Perhaps not.

Banned Google ads and misleading websites

The appearance of the breakout search term “fake labour manifesto” as highlighted at Google Trends points to some of the more bizarre aspects of this general election. The Conservatives have appeared to dabble in black hat tactics, and outright fakery, to try and confuse voters and diffuse the positive results Labour is clearly getting online.

To coincide with the launch of Labour’s manifesto, the Conservative party set up a fake website at labourmanifesto.co.uk and launched a paid search campaign to capture clicks from the SERPs.

Google banned eight search ads of the Conservatives due to policy breach
Google banned eight search ads of the Conservatives due to policy breach

Google promptly banned eight of the Conservatives’ search ads

Google has promptly banned eight of the Conservatives’ search ads. The fake website is still live, but only really visible, currently, when searching for “fake labour manifesto” – and even then it appears below several news sources highlighting the Conservatives unethical behavior.

Google’s ad policy states:

“We value honesty and fairness, so we don’t allow the promotion of products or services that are designed to enable dishonest behaviour.”

I’d be very surprised if the Conservatives’ digital marketing team don’t know this.

But for the sake of democracy, it’s good to see the search engine stick to their principles here.

Promises to increase connectivity

Of the whole election so far, the digital policy which has perhaps received the most headlines is Labour’s “free full-fiber broadband to all by 2030”.

Back in 2016, Jeremy Corbyn won re-election as leader of the Labour Party on the back of such policy announcements as The Digital Democracy Manifesto. It’s not surprising that there is much reference to the emancipatory power of emerging technology and being properly connected in the current manifesto.

The digital democracy manifesto online flyer
The digital democracy manifesto

As the document states, the intentions behind the free broadband initiative are to – “boost jobs, tackle regional inequality and improve quality of life as part of a mission to connect the country”. It is firmly rooted in a fairly detailed nationalization plan which will see the establishment of British Broadband with two arms, British Digital Infrastructure (BDI) and British Broadband Service (BBS), as well as bringing the broadband-relevant parts of BT into public ownership.

While it is a little more buried in the Conservative manifesto, they have their own broadband plan too.

UK election the Conservative and Unionist party Manifesto 2019
UK election – Conservative and Unionist party Manifesto 2019

As is the case for nearly every policy point in the document, it is presented in reference to the UK’s ongoing relationship with the EU:

“We are Europe’s technology capital, producing start-ups and success stories at a dazzling pace. But not everyone can share the benefits”, it states.

“We intend to bring full fiber and gigabit-capable broadband to every home andbusiness across the UK by 2025.”

The policy is highlighted again in later pages as part of the government’s pledge to support rural life and coastal communities. “£5 billion in funding already promised”, it says. But beyond this, there is no detail on how much this broadband provision will cost to the end-user, nor to what degree it will be delivered by the private or public sector.

Education, skills and new technology

While the Conservative manifesto is presented through the lens of Brexit, the Labour manifesto is largely shaped by the environment and their central proposal to kickstart a ‘green industrial revolution.’

A skilled workforce is integral to this. The proposed National Education Service promises free education to everyone throughout their lives. This is of particular interest to those working in digital where we see re-training and re-skilling as increasingly important strategies to plug the skills gap in a fast-changing sector.

“With automation and the Green Industrial Revolution bringing major changes to industry,’ the manifesto states, ‘it is more important than ever that people have the opportunity to retrain and upskill throughout their lives…England already faces a shortage of people with higher-level technical qualifications, and demand for these skills will only grow as we create new green jobs.”

Skills are also a key feature for the Conservatives, despite the document failing to acknowledge the current gap businesses face.

A proposed £3 billion National Skills Fund is earmarked to upskill the British workforce.

“This fund will provide matching funding for individuals and SMEs for high-quality education and training”, the manifesto states.

“A proportion will be reserved for further strategic investment in skills, and we will consult widely on the overall design.”

The Conservatives also promise a further £2 billion to upgrade the entire further education college estate as well as planning to build 20 Institutes of Technology. Although there is little mention of what ends the skills fund and this education investment is for. Services are given a passing mention – “we should open up trade in services, in which the majority of us work and where most new jobs will be created.” – but there is little detail on what these service jobs are expected to be, how they will be supported by the state, and how they will be opened up.

Digital experience in health and public services

Healthcare is a massive issue in this election. Both parties are looking to emerging technologies as a way to help alleviate strains from underfunding and/or an aging population, as well as to improve diagnosis and patient experience.

Labour is pledging to increase spending across the health sector by an average of 4.3% per year. AI and cyber technology are two things earmarked for some of this investment, as well as state-of-the-art medical equipment. Their manifesto also acknowledges the importance of data rights to citizens within this increasingly digital area of our lives, promising to ensure:

  1. ‘Data protection for NHS and patient information.’
  2. ‘NHS data is not exploited by international technology and pharmaceutical corporations.’

The Conservative manifesto is not short on health tech promises either. They pledge to introduce an annual Health Technology Summit and they have also promised £1 billion extra annual social care funding to go towards – in part – new technology and facilities.

In the arena of citizen protections, the Conservative manifesto also proposes a new approach to cybercrime. “We will embrace new technologies and crackdown on online crimes”, the document states. “We will create a new national cybercrime force and empower the police to safely use new technologies like biometrics and artificial intelligence, along with the use of DNA, within a strict legal framework.”

The Labour party manifesto also devotes considerable wordcount to cybersecurity:

“Cybercrime and cyberwarfare are growing, all around the world. Every aspect of our lives, from the NHS to our nuclear facilities”, it states.

In response, the party plans to review two existing bodies – the National Cyber Security Centre and the National Crime Agency – to increase powers, capacity, and skills where necessary.

Labour also wants to extend more rights to citizens online with their proposed Charter of Digital Rights, as well as planning to introduce imprints for digital political adverts in an effort to combat fake news. Additionally, as part of their welfare plans, the party wants to give users multichannel access (online, telephone, face-to-face, and outreach support) to make help and assistance easier to access for all.

Costings

Both parties want big digital corporations to pay more tax. For Labour, this is a costed part of their plan to help fund their free broadband rollout and other projects (£23.7 billion from reversing cuts to corporation tax, £6.3 billion from unitary tax on multinationals, and £6.2 billion from their Fair Tax Programme).

UK elections costings of the Labour party
UK election – Costings of the Labour party

The Conservatives have also promised to implement a digital services tax although there is no mention in the manifesto or the accompanying costings document as to what this tax rate will be, what it will bring in to the government, and which digital services this is aimed at.

On this front, my guess is Google, Facebook, Amazon et al. will be more concerned if a Labour government gets in than if a Conservative one is re-elected.

Much reference is made to British Broadband in Labour’s costings document and it is easy to make the link between their tax and spend plans. When looking at broadband in the Conservative costings document, however, its cost as part of their infrastructure strategy is reiterated, but it’s hard to see how it will actually be funded.

Further analysis of both party’s costings documents highlights the divide between them

When it comes to skills, the link between the money that’s needed for Labour to roll out their Lifelong Learning is easy to see across two tables. Yet the Conservative manifesto and costings document are harder to process. There are numerous tables, as well as proposed investments such as the ‘National Skills Fund worth £3 billion’ (as it is described in the manifesto) looking like it won’t receive any more than ~£600 million per year from 2021 until the end of the parliament (adding up to just £1.8 billion in total).

Analysis of Labour and Conservative party's costing documents
Analysis of Labour and Conservative party’s costing documents

 

This trend continues in the context of health and public services technology.

£1 billion for social care per year is certainly a welcome promise by the Conservatives – with an aging population, staff shortages, and the availability of emerging technologies that help with remote care and increased independence for citizens. But when turning to the costings document again, this is nearly a third of the total income from the first year of their Sources of Revenue table and it doesn’t fill me with confidence that a party operating in the wake of their own austerity measures can actually deliver these PR-quotable lumps of cash.

Analysis of Labour and Conservative party's costing documents table 4

Takeaways for the parties

The search campaigns by both parties in the lead up to this election have positive and negative points.

The simplistic and memorable SEO approach from the Conservatives may well be all they need to convince voters. But through the lens of the Google SERPs, the “get Brexit done” slogan has brought about some negative sentiment and doesn’t seem to be driving the traffic as we might expect.

Closing note regarding the Labour Party

Labour, on the other hand, has seemingly tried to capture attention via a number of issues. This is reflected in the manifesto itself, the site structure and onsite SEO, and the traffic success the domain is having with niche key phrases such as “labour manifesto waspi”.

Closing note regarding the Conservative Party

Yet, to look at the above and assume that the Conservatives have been lazy with their online campaign is wrong. Their paid search activity appears to have been synchronized and calculated. And rather than put forward their own policies in an attempt to influence clicks to their manifesto content, they’ve turned their efforts to misleading users and firing cheap shots at Labour policies which are seeing a positive response online.

Of course, these underhand tactics within the SERPs weren’t an isolated incident.

The Conservatives were also criticized (by The New York Times and others) when their press office passed off partisan opinion as objective ‘fact-checking’ on Twitter. The party’s activists have also been found to be posing as the Green Party in Facebook ads (in an attempt to split the left-leaning vote).

In the world of digital marketing, all these channels carry weight, but I would argue that it is the party’s search activities that are the most worrying from a democratic point of view. There’s no shifting the blame to frivolous press office employees or activists here – fake microsites and time-sensitive paid search campaigns are far more strategic, and those in the upper echelons of the party should bear at least some responsibility.

Takeaways for digital businesses

The Conservatives have been punished by Google for some of their activities, but whether they are punished at the ballot box remains to be seen. In the world of search, it is never worth trying to deceive users or impersonate competitors for clicks.

Those of us working in the digital industries are very aware of both the challenges and the opportunities in a technologically transformed world. The skills gap is a very immediate issue for all businesses adopting digital tools and emerging technologies. It is important that there are state-supported programs to try and close this gap.

In the UK, we also need a government committed to connecting those in society who are left behind when it comes to broadband provision. This is significant for those wanting to start up digital businesses away from urban centers, as well as for those whose digital audiences will grow with the rollout of dependable internet in rural areas.

In the business context

Consumers expect data protections and commitment to security – as well as experiences that are seamless across channels and customer-led. As more and more parts of our lives become entwined with digital technology – be it in healthcare or other public services – we need to be able to trust that attitudes towards rights and data are citizen-led. Members of the public must be educated, empowered, and safe.

There is much pessimism about what is around the corner for the UK – a country faced with Brexit, the environmental crisis, and more besides. In a superficial sense, it’s possible to read these manifestos as a business owner and be daunted by the detail of corporation tax rises in the Labour document while feeling that the Conservatives would be a profit-friendly prospect. But it is the lack of detail in the Conservative manifesto which should be a major worry to corporations: the ‘digital services tax,’ the commitment to seemingly arbitrary investment lumps, and even ‘get Brexit done’ rings hollow after three years of failed negotiations – how can any corporation trust this?

A government that is committed to ethical, reasonable, transparent, and long term ideas about how we can work and live together is one that I feel we should be supporting at this election and those forthcoming in the US and elsewhere. After all, these are the virtues I would expect of a modern business faced with the challenges and opportunities of a future of digital transformation and emerging technology. It seems justified to expect this in politics too.

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The post The UK election and SEO games: Search, scandal, and big promises appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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Best Sites with Free Images for Blogs (High Quality and Without Login)

Free Images for Blogs

If you are looking for free images to use in your blogs that are copyright free, then this post is for you. We did our research and found the best high-quality sites with free stock photos you can use in your blog posts.

In this post, you’ll also learn how free stock photo websites work, how to use Google image search to find images you can use without attribution and how to properly optimize your images for best SEO results.

What you should know about Free Stock Photos Websites

When you search Google for “Free Images” or “Free Stock Photos”, you’ll get hundreds of websites offering free images available for immediate download.

Once you start visiting these sites, you’ll notice that most of the free images are the same on all sites!

This is happening because most of the ‘free sites’ are using APIs of large paid sites (like iStockPhoto, Shutterstock, DepositPhotos, etc) to display both free and paid images in their results. Their ultimate goal is to redirect users to the premium websites and get a commission every time a new user is registered for a paid plan.

While there is nothing wrong with that, if you want to download images for free (that are licensed under creative commons public domain or CCO), you should be careful not to click on a premium image that requires payment.

All the sites listed below clearly identify which images are 100% free and which are paid, and this minimizes the risk of clicking on an image that is not free. I suggest you bookmark this page and revisit it when searching for visual content to use in your articles or pages.

Best Sites that Offer Free Images for Blogs

These are the top sites to download high-quality royalty-free stock photos for your next blog post.

  1. Pixabay
  2. Unsplash
  3. Free Images
  4. Pexels
  5. Canva
  6. PicJumbo
  7. Reshot
  8. Foodiesfeed
  9. Foca
  10. ISO Republic

1. Pixabay

pixabay
Download Free Images on Pixabay

Pixabay has one of the best collections of free images and videos you can use on your blogs, social posts or even for commercial purposes without permission.

You can search and download any image without having to log in or create an account.

Images are available in 4 sizes: 4000×2667, 1920×1280, 1280×853, 640×426.

Get Free Images

2. Unsplash

unsplash
Download Free Stock Photos on Unsplash

Another resource for high-resolution photos is Unsplash. Their license states that all photos can be used for free (for personal or commercial use), without asking permission or providing credit to the photographer.

Downloading an image does not require to login or create an account but images come in only one dimension (as displayed on their website).

Get Free Images

3. Free Images

freeimages

As expected, all images downloaded from freeimages.com are free to use for editorial and commercial use.

The difference between this site and unsplash or pixabay is that in case you use an image in a blog post or other editorial content, you need to include credit attribution as described here.

It does not require a link back to the site but a mention of the artist’s name either in the photo or in the credits section.

Get Free Images

4. Pexels

pexels
Get Free Stock Photos from Pexels

One of the free stock photography websites that I use regularly is Pexels. I found that they have a very nice collection of images suitable for digital marketing topics.

A great feature of Pexels that is not found on other sites is the ability to resize the image to a custom size before downloading.

Also, you can download images without creating an account and they are free to use without attribution.

Get Free Images

5. Canva

canva
Download Copyright Free Images from Canva

Canva is an online graphic design tool. I use Canva regularly to create graphics and other types of visual content for my blog posts.

Besides the graphic design features, Canva has a beautiful collection of copyright-free images that you can download and use in your content.

Their image search functionality is much better than the other websites and you can filter the results to show only images that are 100% free.

PRO TIP: Canva is fetching free images from a number of websites so if you want to find out all free images about a topic or keyword, you can use canva and get all the results without having to visit each site separately.

Get Free Images

6. PicJumbo

PicJumbo
PicJumbo

Picjumbo is a free stock photo site since 2013. All images are free to use without requiring attribution.

New images are added on a daily basis and you get them in your email by subscribing to their newsletter.

All images are available in high definition but there is no option to resize or download the images in different formats.

Get Free Images

7. Reshot

Reshot
Reshot

Reshot’s slogan is “Uniquely free photos. Handpicked, non-stocky images” and while this is true, their search functionality is not so efficient.

They have some nice and unique images on the site but to find them you may have to use a combination of keywords in your search.

Get Free Images

8. Foodiesfeed

Foodies Feed
Foodies Feed

If you are looking for free images for your food or nutrition blog, then this is the website to visit first.

Foodiesfeed has beautiful high-quality images of various foods, which can be downloaded instantly from the site without login.

All images are licensed using the Creative Commons Zero (CCO) license which means you can use it in any way you want without attribution.

Get Free Images

9. Foca

Foca Stock
Foca Stock

The nice thing about FOCA is the clutter-free interface. You can easily use the site without having to browse through ads or annoying popups.

In addition, they have search filters to narrow down your results based on orientation, color, and type of visual content.

Get Free Images

10. ISO Republic

ISO Republic
ISO Republic

Their motto is “Thousands of Free High-Resolution CC0 Photos and Videos” and it’s true.

ISO republic has a nice collection of royalty-free images and videos and they also have a blog with nice photography tips.

Get Free Images

Another way to find free images without visiting individual sites is to use Google Image Search.

When you search for images on Google, by default it displays both copyrighted and copyrighted-free images. If you want to find free photos to use for personal or commercial use without providing credit, then you need to use the ‘usage rights’ filter.

Here is how it works.

Go to Google Images and search for an image

Click TOOLS and select LABELED FOR REUSE under the USAGE RIGHTS.

Find Copyright Free Images on Google
Find Copyright Free Images on Google

What you see now it’s images that can be used without violating any copyright rights.

Find Free Images on Google

Best Practices for using images in your blog posts

I’ve mentioned many times that images are good for blogs. They make content easier to read and they help in improving the visual appearance of a page.

In addition to that, you need to have at least one image within your content because:

It’s good for SEO – Several studies revealed that pages that rank in the top position of Google have at least one image within the post content.

You need images for social media purposes – If you want to share your content on social media, you need to have at least one image so that it looks good on the different networks.

The negative aspect of having a lot of images in your content is that they slow down a page, especially on mobile devices.

Follow the best practices below to eliminate the negative effects of using images in your content.

Image Best Practices

Resize the image to the large size you will use

When you download a high-resolution image the actual size (width and height) is usually more than the biggest size you’ll need.  So, before uploading to your site, use a tool (like Pixelmator or Photoshop) to resize it to the max size you need and export it for the web. This will dramatically reduce the file size (in MB) for the image.

If you are using WordPress make sure that responsive images are enabled

This is a feature of WordPress where it automatically resizes and serves the right size image depending on the device and screen resolutions. It is enabled by default on WordPress but double check in case your theme has responsive images disabled.

Compress image file size

Besides resizing the images to the right size, you can also use tools like imageoptim or imagecompressor to compress images. These tools can reduce the file size of an image considerably without affecting the quality.

Consider hiding images on mobile

On mobile devices, every byte matters so consider hiding images that are not important for the content (like background images). This will make your mobile pages smaller in size and faster to load.

Use LazyLoading

Lazy Loading is a feature that instructs the browser not to fetch an image until it is needed. This helps a lot in making pages load faster. Google has a plugin for that as well. I’m using wp-rocket and has this feature built-in.

Optimize your images for SEO

Image SEO is the practice of making your images available to search engines in a way they can understand.

The most important SEO element for images is the ALT TEXT so make sure that you provide for a meaningful alt text for each and every image you use in your content.

Conclusion

Despite the fact that some of the images are common to a number of sites, free stock photography sites are useful for designers, developers, digital marketers, and bloggers.

Use them as the starting point of finding the perfect photos for your blog posts. In many cases, you can find what you want for free. If you want to access paid images, I suggest you go with a service like Canva that offers millions of images and a graphic design tool at an affordable price.

The post Best Sites with Free Images for Blogs (High Quality and Without Login) appeared first on reliablesoft.net.

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How to create PPC reports people will actually read

I used to have a love/hate relationship with reporting. 

I loved it because data was the sweet nectar we all need to achieve better growth. Reporting allowed us to collect it, ready to take action. Plus, there was something oddly satisfying about seeing what you had physically achieved.

On the flip side, I hated reporting because it took so much time and effort.  In fact, statistically, reporting is actually the second biggest time sink for PPC managers. This isn’t surprising. (If you’re curious, keyword research was in first place. We’ve already covered how you’re wasting your time on keyword research here).

After pouring so much time into reporting, those reports were ignored. Clients didn’t care or understand. So what was the point?

But then I discovered a better way and started making reports that people actually wanted to read in a fraction of the time. You can do the same and stop hating your reporting by doing one simple thing. 

Stop overcomplicating it. 

Yeah, a groundbreaking statement there. If you read our work on easier PPC management, you’ll see that this is a common theme. 

But don’t worry, I’m not going to give you some inspirational yet impractical quote and leave you to go on your way. This isn’t that type of article. 

A data happy wonderland

Over complication of reporting comes down to two key areas: 

  1. The data you’re using in the reports. 
  2. How you are creating your reports. 

We’re about to get into the first one. 

Some reports look like Willy Wonka and the data factory. There are metrics everywhere you look! Which isn’t all that helpful. 

Make your reports simpler by selecting the data that matters. But that is easier said than done. You need to show the full picture of what’s going on, however not every campaign can be judged by the same metrics. 

So what do you do? 

Who is reading this? 

Take a step back. Who is this report going to? 

Putting yourself in the shoes of who is reading the reports will help narrow down the actual metrics that you need to use. If it’s going to a small business owner who just wants to know if the campaigns are worth it, make sure you show them the conversions and ROAS. 

If it’s going to a marketing manager who is intent on building brand awareness, show them the impressions and clicks. 

In addition, explain things to them. Tell them what these metrics mean and why they’re important – in terms that they will understand. Rather than giving people a sheet of numbers, give them value, information and context. 

This will help ensure that your reports aren’t just read, but that they’re used. 

The exact content you need will depend on who they’re going out to. These are people you will know better than us. 

If you’re not sure – ask them. Find out the most important aspect they check and what reports are actually useful for them. There’s no point building reports for the sake of them. If they want something particular, build that and move on. 

Ah. That’s much simpler. 

Step back from the vanity metrics

Vanity metrics are those that serve no purpose other than to boost your ego and make things look good. But they don’t actually deliver any actionable value and should not be included in your reports. 

They are a colossal waste of time. 

Metrics like time on site are a great example of this. If users are spending more time on your landing page, this metric might be included in your report for a boost. But this doesn’t actually show anything. Whether someone spends 2 seconds or 4 hours on your landing page doesn’t matter – the only thing that does is taking action. 

Most of this is about context though. 

If you’re trying to increase sales of a new product you’ve launched, you shouldn’t be looking at ad impressions. It delivers nothing valuable other than an odd “neat!” exclamation. 

So what if 5,000 people have seen the ad? Tell me how many people have bought the product. 

That’s what matters. And this is what your reports should be made from. 

Right, that’s data covered. Now let’s talk about how you’re actually building these reports. 

Let go of the Excel sheet reports 

There’s a time and a place for Excel. And I think as long as PPC lives, there will be a use for it. 

I never want to make another Excel report again. Time-consuming isn’t even the word. It’s fiddly. It’s ugly and it’s practically unreadable to anyone that isn’t an Excel wizard themselves. 

But we don’t live in the dark ages anymore. There are plenty of programs and tools that you can use that are far quicker and easier on the eyes. They also might make it more accurate too, as according to Adverity, 90% of all spreadsheets contain errors. 

In fact, a quick Google search has brought up dozens of options, including Sisense, Reporting Ninja, Agency Analytics and Swydo. And of course, our own platform, Adzooma. In my completely unbiased opinion, ours is obviously the best. 

The point is, it’s easy to find a tool that will work for you. Once you do, build templates. These will be the key to your success. 

Note how I used the plural here for templates. Like there’s no “one-size-fits-all” campaign, there’s not going to be one for your reports. Create templates that are for specific purposes or people so you can roll them out exactly when you need them with minimal effort. 

Get visual

By nature, we are visual creatures. That’s just who we are. It’s an instinct to seek out images – I’ll even bet that your eyes went to the images on this page before you read these words right?

Showing your data in a visual way is every marketer’s dream and increases the chances of your reports being read. A harsh but true fact there. 

But there’s a difference between useful visual representations of data – and useless time-consuming gimmicks that really don’t work. 

It has to fit the data and make it easy to understand. You know what this doesn’t apply to? Pie charts. There are almost no PPC metrics that fit nicely into a pie chart. And yet, so many people insist on using them for everything. 

I’m hoping the below image will highlight this well… 

All joking aside, picking the right graphs is a very important thing to consider. In an ideal world, every report could look fantastically engaging with professionally designed infographics. But that’s a lot of time and budget for something that isn’t needed. 

You need to simplify it. Which means simple, yet visual, ways of showing the data. Generally, line graphs are some of the best options, particularly if you’re showing changes over time. 

This is because you can easily see with your eyes what’s happening and follow a visual story of it moving through time. 

Simple. Easy to understand. Efficient. Don’t underestimate how simple graphs can uncomplicate your reporting. 

Get the AI to do it for you

Surprise, it’s another case of AI (Artificial Intelligence) saving the day. This is a recurring theme and will carry on until every business realizes that AI is an absolute necessity. 

Anyway, back to the point. 

AI is a time-saving miracle for reporting. Let me show you by guiding you through own reporting tool inside Adzooma

Here’s how it works. 

  1. You go to the reporting tab in the top corner.
  2. Click the ‘Create report’ button. 
  3. Add what elements you want, including text, images and even your own logo. 
  4. With the data, select the exact metrics you want, in the format you need. Whether it’s a table or a line graph, the data will auto-populate from your account, saving you the job of having to find it yourself. 
  5. Want to add a new page or change the layout? Just hit the buttons above. 
  6. And you’re done. 

Save and export them as needed. 

One of the best features? Once you’re done – your report will be saved as a template. 

So when you’re ready for a new one you just have to click it. That’s it. It will automatically update itself with the new data, ready for you to send off. That’s your reporting, done in seconds. Ready to stop overcomplicating your reporting? Try our powerful AI tools for free.

The post How to create PPC reports people will actually read appeared first on Search Engine Land.

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