SEO Articles

The evolution of search: succeeding in today’s digital ecosystem – part 2

In the first part of our discussion on the evolution of search, we looked at the change in customer behaviors, which has led to a struggle between search engines and apps to remain relevant.

We also started to dissect key parts of the new digital ecosystem, looking in detail at the most obvious manifestation of these indirect answers, the information that powers these, and the change in mindset required to capitalize on the opportunities direct answers present. In this second part, we will consider further the outputs of the fundamental changes to search—and what this means for SEO as a channel in the future.

Voice is important, but we’re looking at it the wrong way

It wouldn’t be right to consider the evolution of search and featured snippets without discussing voice search. Many are looking to this as the new frontier for search, doubling down on strategies to become the answer to questions that people ask. Voice search is undoubtedly taking off in a big way, with 2016 being a turning point in the growth of the channel, but there are two challenges “voice marketers” will face: firstly, there is still a stigma to using voice in public—consumers may use quick commands, but they are yet to embrace the full capabilities of smart assistants among other people.

Secondly, smart speakers are becoming a part of people’s homes in a big way, with an estimated 40% of UK homes due to have an Amazon Echo in 2018. Despite this, companies will struggle to convince their audiences to receive unsolicited branded messages without permission. This is more of a problem in the wake of GDPR and claims of smart devices “listening in,” and I expect more tolerance to come in the future.

Until that point, it doesn’t matter if you’re the answer; users won’t know who has delivered the results they are listening to.

A much bigger opportunity in voice, although falling a little outside of the search marketer’s remit, are “skills.” When the app store launched, many of the first apps were utilitarian or games; the idea of a “branded” app was yet to be developed. However, as smartphones became ubiquitous, the prevalence of apps increased. I believe the same will be true of “skills.” For now, many of these provide data that the assistants cannot store first-hand, such as bus times and weather information. Over time, however, these could provide a branded experience for more conventional voice queries. Already, skills allow brands to provide a personalized response across voice. Importantly, as skills must be linked, these are solicited; or, put simply, you can brand the answers you give to user questions in an agreed format. Right now, this is a powerful tool; in the future, this will be a game-changer.

For those still looking to own the answers, owning the data feeds is key. While you can optimize for this in the same way as featured snippets, it’s harder to convince voice speakers, whose sole result has to be infallible or users will stop asking, that you are the one result to rule them all. This is why I believe Yext’s recent announcement that they will be pushing information directly to Alexa is as critical a change to search marketing as the launch of Penguin or Panda. For the first time, key data and knowledge feeds can be directly inputted into and brands can not only influence the information that Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and other platforms have on them (which is currently the case with answer optimization), they can own the narrative entirely.

As search engines look to promote results directly in search (whatever the format), this is a giant step forward towards the digital ecosystem of the future and should not be underestimated.

Speed and mobile are intrinsically linked; new formats will enable this

We’re all bored of hearing the phrase “content is king”—in fact, the “is king” moniker has been done to death. “Speed is king,” this probably does not carry the weight it needs to; and this is a shame, because it runs the risk of overlooking a crucial part of web marketing in 2018. From a pure SEO perspective, speed is now linked to improved visibility, in the same way that the interstitial ad penalty penalized sites for pop-ups.

However, if you’re blocking pop-ups or reducing your page load times for search traffic alone, you are firmly missing the point. This isn’t an “SEO thing.” This is a user experience essential, based on the changing demands of the digital-savvy customer in the modern age of technology; an audience that expects to quickly access the content they wish to furiously consume. Any delays or blockers in this process can be disastrous—not only to the brand, but to search engines as a whole.

Popular apps provide seamless, tailored experiences to their users; to stay as information leaders, this has to be replicated across search. A slow response, even if it’s not directly the fault of the provider, only serves to drive users away.

This is why Google is backing new formats; from accelerated mobile pages to progressive web apps and all device-focused changes (including in their index), the search giant is looking to improve the quality of the mobile web, a challenge it is uniquely well-positioned to undertake. As SEOs we should be embracing this—it’s better for our users. Yet we are limited by questions around tracking and data integrity (which Google is looking to change) and by the main engines’ ability to crawl and index JavaScript content, a programming language that will be key to bringing about the change that Google, Bing, and other providers need to stay relevant to their users.

For now, the biggest threat is mobile and apps; as other emerging technologies become more widely adopted, particularly in the immersive experience space, both the web and search engines will need to catch up to survive. And I believe that not only is it the responsibility of SEOs to drive forward these changes, it is both absolutely in our interest to do so and intrinsic to the continuation of investment in our channel. 

The future is bright, but SEO will never be the same

With the rise of apps and Google looking to push answers directly to users, reducing the importance of the website in the digital ecosystem, you could argue that the importance of SEO activity is dwindling. This would be a myopic view of the future; while the basis of our activity roadmap may change, there will be a requirement for optimization. As the major algorithm launches earlier in the decade fundamentally changed the way we operate and skills required to succeed in the channel, so too will the behavioral changes we are currently experiencing. As we have always done, we will adapt.

In his 2016 Brighton SEO talk, Jono Anderson argued that the digital marketer of the future will not need to learn new skill-sets but combine existing ones. For search marketers, this means focusing on specific areas of knowledge where we can be the most effective, instead of trying to know it all as we currently do. Most digital agencies have already separated content and SEO teams into two different, yet complementary work streams. Structuring technical and local experts into teams of their own is becoming more popular and in doing so, allows the marketers within them to shape their abilities around the requirements and objectives of their specialism.

Looking ahead, there will always be a place for search engines in the digital ecosystem, although their importance to the whole is yet to be decided. As such, there will be a continued opportunity (and need) for search marketing. The SEO of the future may be a very different person than now and the focus of digital agencies will be split between building brands, building web experiences, and structuring information to be easily understood by data feeds. But until agencies truly leave the ranking factors of the past behind and fully support this new digital world, powered by technology, convenience and customers, it will be at perpetual risk of becoming irrelevant to our audiences.

Read More

Writing great social media content for your blog

Writing great social media content for your blog

I’ve always felt lucky blogging for Yoast.com. As I wrote before, I have an entire blog team that makes sure my post gets scheduled, is free of grammar or spelling errors and they publish it on social media. So I ‘only’ had to come up with an idea, which the team often helped me with, and type the post. I decided that if I ever were to outsource things on my own blog, it would be things like promotion and social media.

My struggle with social media

And then the inevitable happened. After I finished my previous post, I got a message: “Caroline, from now on, please write your own introduction for Facebook, Twitter, and the newsletter. Here’s some information for you. If you have any questions, let us know!” Hold on! Yes, I have questions! Starting with: “How do I do this?” and: “Do you have any idea how difficult it is to write short messages? There’s a reason I’m not active on Twitter!” And, so began my struggle, and search, for the ultimate social media messages.

Optimize your site for search & social media and keep it optimized with Yoast SEO Premium »

$89 – Buy now » Info

Because truthfully, I’d rather type a 2000 word essay than one sentence for Facebook. When you’re reading this, I’ve already grabbed your attention. You’ve already made it down to this point in my post, which means that you want to read my message. On social media, I can’t spend over a hundred words to make my point. If I do, you might not click, you might scroll past my message and you’ll never see my post at all.

And that’s how I started my two-day research. Two days? Yes. I, of course, started rather late with this blog post and had almost no time to conduct proper research. So, all the information in this post is based on my common sense – and I’ll teach you how to use your common sense too! Oh, how amazing my job is. Truly. Well, apart from having to write my own social media messages now.

To click or not to click

When do you click on a Facebook message? When do you hit the like button? When do you leave a reply? And when do you take the effort to go to someone’s profile and visit their domain through Instagram if there’s a ‘link in bio’ message underneath a photo? Those questions were the most important for me the last few days, to figure out what the perfect message entails. To find the answer to these questions, you need to know who your audience is.

For my blog, that’s a rather easy answer: the goal audience for my blog is me! And people like me, of course. But, I started my blog because I love writing. I’m right in the middle of my audience: young mothers (and fathers, of course) who are struggling with parenthood and want reassurance that others are struggling too. I want people to laugh at my stories, but also to take their struggles and life a little less serious, in order to enjoy life more.

Experimenting on different platforms

While people who visit my blog always tell me I have a great sense of humor – except for my husband, he still claims I have no humor at all – my Facebook page didn’t reflect my blog at all and come to think of it, I didn’t even like Facebook.

I started experimenting on Instagram: my photos were more blunt, I used a lot of hashtags (thirty hashtags seems to be the maximum) and I treated Instagram as if I was talking to my best friend. Immediately, my engagement went up. People responded to my photos with more than just a heart, they actually left messages! I started to get to know my audience more and more, and then a few days ago I decided I’d use the same strategy on Facebook.

I took a notebook and wrote down when I was interested in a Facebook post from another company, and when I scrolled past. And, although this is personal (and not perfect) research, this works for me, since I am a reflection of my own audience. I made notes on the posts I clicked on: what was the message they wrote? What was the title of the post? Did the image appeal to me? And when did I decide not to click on a post?

I found out that I click the link if these three aspects: text, title, and photo of the post, appeal to me. There are messages I saw multiple times but I didn’t click them, because the Facebook image wasn’t appealing enough, or the leading text was too vague or didn’t catch my attention.

Learn how to write awesome and SEO friendly articles in our SEO Copywriting training »

$199 – Buy now » Info

How to find your voice on social media

It’s important your social media reflects your website. If you write for solo travelers who are 20 years old, it’d be strange if your social media posts are more appealing to people who’d rather stay in and haven’t taken a vacation in the last 20 years. Just like you once found your voice for your blog, you need to find your voice on social media too. And you’ll have to experiment before you find it. Here’s how to experiment:

Realize that your social media are part of your brand

Facebook, Instagram, and other social media are extensions of your blog. Try to find the reason why you follow someone on Instagram, hit the like button on Facebook or retweet a message on Twitter. It’s probably because you feel connected to someone or to the brand. Those social media accounts should reflect the blog, in this case.

Write different introductions

By writing and rewriting your Facebook messages a few times, you will eventually find the voice that fits your brand. You can’t be as elaborate on Facebook or Instagram as you are on your blog. You need to catch people’s attention and get them to click that link to your website.

With Facebook, you can easily re-post a post that’s a couple of months old. Check which posts performed less: you can look that up on your Facebook page under ‘Statistics’. Check the accompanying message you wrote, try to rewrite them and see if you can gain more clicks.

It’s all about strategy

As much as you need a blog planning, you also need a social media planning and a strategy. If you post on Facebook only once a week, you probably won’t reach a lot of people. However, if you post once or twice a day, you’ll see your reach going up. Those posts don’t always have to be a link to your blog, especially not when you only blog every other day or once a week. Share images, ask questions, share links to other blogs in your niche or share quotes. Look at your competition and try to find a new angle to implement on your social media profiles.

Read more: How to use social media »

And now it’s time for me to write a nice introduction for social media so you’ll actually end up clicking and reading this message. Wish me luck. Oh and please drop your tips on me as well! You have no idea how much I learn from the comments you leave on my blog posts!

Keep reading: Social media strategy: where to begin? »

 

The post Writing great social media content for your blog appeared first on Yoast.

Read More

Search basics: the difference between URL structure and Information Architecture

Search basics: the difference between URL structure and Information Architecture

I’ve recently noticed some confusion around the industry on the differences between URL structures and Information Architecture (IA). I thought it was worth clarifying a few points and giving you all some language that is useful when talking about the differences.

Pre-requisites – if you aren’t familiar with the following elements, it’s worth reading these primers before you dive in deeper here:

What is a URL?
What are the SEO considerations for URLs?

Google’s guidelines for URLs

What is Information Architecture?

That article focuses specifically on IA considerations for SEO, for a broader overview of IA more generally, this is a great resource

The specific thing I want to clarify is the differences between decisions about the path in your URLs and decisions about your IA as this is where I often see a ton of confusion.

Decisions about URL structures and decisions about the IA of your website both involve questions about grouping and hierarchies of pages. For example:

URL: should the path of an individual product be:

/product-slug
/products/slug
/products/category/slug
/products/category/sub-category/slug

IA: how should we group our product pages and link between them:

Should there be a link “up” to the parent category?
How many “levels” of sub-category page types should there be?
How do we link between sibling products in the same (sub-)category?
How many products can we reach in (e.g.) 3 clicks from the homepage?
How should we handle facets?

The fact that both concern groupings and hierarchies has led too often to people misinterpreting IA questions as URL questions.

From an SEO perspective, most of the grouping and hierarchy questions we care about are questions about which pages should exist (e.g. should there be an indexable page for “red men’s shoes above a size 11”) and how should our pages be linked together (both from a crawling perspective – thinking about considerations like click depth, and from a ranking perspective – thinking about considerations like internal link equity).

Unfortunately, I’ve too often seen these IA questions expressed as URL considerations, and this can lead to advice that is less effective than it should be. For many of these IA questions, you can come down on either side of the IA decision with either URL structure:

You can choose to have a (sub-)category page type without necessarily having the (sub-)category appear in the URL as a keyword or as a folder (and indeed, there are times that this is a good idea if products can be in multiple categories or if they often move category)
You can choose to link “up” the hierarchy or “across” to sibling products with or without those link targets sharing elements of their paths (e.g. a product page at /product-slug can link to a parent page at /category even if it doesn’t have a URL of /category/product-slug)

In general, the IA considerations are more important than the URL considerations, and you should focus on the Information Architecture with higher priority. It’s IA that governs the flow of internal link equity (PageRank) and also that governs crawlability and discoverability of different pages and page types. In general when we talk about pages being “higher in the IA” or “closer to the homepage” we mean in click-depth rather than folder structure. You can’t fix IA issues with URL changes alone. For whatever IA decisions you make, you can then make decisions around how to structure the paths for your pages’ URLs to make the best trade-off you can between the constant tensions:

It can be good to have appropriate keywords in the path (for users and search engines(*))
Human-readable paths are helpful (and structure can help with reporting)
BUT shorter paths are generally better than longer

(*) see “the importance of keywords in URLs” below

Probably the only real constraint that paths create for IA is that if you go down the path of having nested folders, that will generally imply the existence of pages at each level of folder. In other words, a page at /level1/level2/level3 implies that /level1/level2 will also exist as a real page (as much for users as anything else).

Summary of IA vs. URLs

Information Architecture decisions for search performance focus on:

What (kinds of) pages should exist on my site?
How should our pages and page types link to one another?

You may choose to group pages of the same page type together by, for example, placing them in a folder, but this is an independent decision about URL structure. In general, URL structure decisions are less important than IA decisions.

How important are keywords in URLs?

At MnSummit, my colleague Rob heard Google representative John Mueller say that there was no SEO need to translate URLs for foreign language sites. This surprised me, because (unless Google is already translating all inputs and outputs) this implies that keywords in the path make no difference in search either. I would have thought that all else being equal a page called /shoes/red would outperform /products/12512 for a whole variety of reasons.

So: I’m inclined to add this to the list of things that Google says are true that may be technically true, if read narrowly enough, but are unhelpful in the real world. My most charitable reading is that John is saying something like “Google does not have a specific element of the algorithm that checks language in page paths”.

So, although the primary focus of this post has been IA considerations I do think that it’s sensible to have some element of descriptive keyword in your URLs because although we can’t be certain it’s an explicit ranking factor:

Above everything else, it’s good for usability
Google says this explicitly in their guidelines

It is a keyword-relevance signal of some kind (however weak)
Google’s guidelines only argument is the usability one above, but that whole guideline section is explicitly about performance in Google, with primarily technical advice, and it seems reasonable to me to believe that they are saying we prefer (and rank better) pages like this because users prefer them
We do know explicitly that URL, path, and filename are explicit keyword signals for some file types

It is more likely to result in relevant anchor text in external links
A point made even in Google’s own SEO guide (in a section entitled “Simple URLs convey content information” which supports the arguments above as well)

I would expect a better click-through rate from the search results when it does rank

And for sure try to have URLs in the correct target language. Regardless of whether you agree with me or John Mueller about the SEO benefit, I think we both agree that your users would prefer URLs in their own language.

A note on changing URLs and moving content

There are always risks to moving content – even with well-implemented redirects and no mistakes – and so you should only undertake URL changes with care. In general, IA changes are more reversible as things are more likely to go back to how they were if you undo the change while the nature of a 301 (“permanent”) redirect is that it should signal that things are not going to change back.

For that reason, while we would often recommend moving from dynamic URLs with a bunch of parameters in them to cleaner URLs, and may recommend moving from impenetrable URLs to more readable ones, it will generally be hard to justify a move from reasonably-good URLs to arguably-better. Do your own risk assessment, and proceed with caution!

Read More

How to create an optimized career page for your website

How to create an optimized career page for your website

With recruitment as competitive a market as it has ever been, it’s essential to ensure every careers page or job vacancy on your website is fully optimized in order to place it in front of the perfect candidate online.

They are some of the largest and most powerful websites around, but typically online job boards lack page authority, so while you cannot compete with them on a domain level, you can still outrank these huge companies with good SEO.

The next step is selling your vacancy to the candidate, which can sometimes be a tough process, but one that your job pages can definitely help you out with.

How should you go about doing this?

Conduct thorough keyword research

Your first port of call to ensure your careers pages are fully optimized is to conduct some thorough keyword research in order to identify relevant keywords to target on your job pages.

Location-specific job searches invariably have a favorable ratio between search volume and keyword difficulty (competitiveness), so it’s crucial to ensure you are targeting properly before you begin to optimize.

Ahrefs is my tool of choice for this due to the ease of use and array of filters available to use.

Use internal links

Internal links are your chance to tell Google which pages on your site are the most important. You can manage your internal links as you wish, but one recommended strategy is for any page you are trying to rank, you should point internal links at it from the more powerful pages on your website.

A good way of finding these authoritative pages is by using the ‘Top Pages’ category in ahrefs (other tools are available) which will filter your pages by URL rating (authority) in a descending order. You are left with a list of your most powerful pages ready to be linked from.

When trying to boost vacancy pages, adding natural looking anchor text along the lines of ‘Like what you are reading? See our latest job openings’ and linking to the live positions can work well.

Internal linking is an oft-underutilized strategy in SEO and Andy Drinkwater is one of the more prominent voices on the topic often sharing useful, actionable information with the SEO community.

Maximize your content

Ensure the copy featured on each of your careers pages is optimized to rank well. Your content should be specific to your company and the individual role, with a minimum word count of 250 words.

Make it enticing! And if your company has a personality, ensure you show it.

The copy itself should be relevant and informative to the user, answering any specific queries they may have. The more information you can give the prospect the better.

Avoid duplicate content at all costs and try to be creative – you can assume the job seeker is looking at a number of job posts so you really need to try and stand out here.

Go behind the scenes

Provide potential employees with a look behind the scenes at your offices before they apply for a role. This is likely to benefit both you and the prospective employee as they can see if the environment appeals to them.

An office walkthrough is the ideal way to show what life is like at your company, plus the tour footage can form part of your Google Business listing (if recorded by an accredited Google Business). Appearing alongside your company address and telephone number, it’s an effective way to boost your site’s local SEO.

If you really want to stand out from your competitors, however, why not invest in a 360 degree tour of your office? This can also be VR-based. Interactive and realistic, it’s the next best thing to being in your office in person and will help a prospective employee to really visualize working for you.

Once you’ve taken these factors into consideration, you also need to think about Google Jobs.

What is Google Jobs?

Having launched in the US in 2017 and the UK in July this year, Google’s new job search tool Google Jobs looks set to radically alter the way job seekers search for roles, also impacting recruitment agencies and their processes.

Google caused a disturbance in the flight industry with the launch of Google Flights, which saw an immediate uptake in bookings from customers who were frustrated by the tendency of airlines to withhold information about additional costs such as baggage fees whilst booking, in order to make their flights appear cheaper.  

Inc.com attributed the success of Google Flights to increased transparency to customers, who are able to see all the relevant costs prior to booking a flight, plus any predicted delays. The impact of the launch of Google Flights was immediate, with Business Insider stating the platform was “…an embarrassment to the airline industry”.

The search engine’s success in identifying and capitalizing upon weaknesses in the travel and tourism industry is expected to be replicated in the recruitment industry with the launch of Google Jobs.

Simply recognizing users’ frustration at a lack of information, collating results at once and then proceeding to provide this information immediately results in a more valuable service for users.

What does the launch of Google Jobs mean for job vacancies online?

Google Jobs has been designed to simplify and speed up the process of job-hunting for the job-seeker. At the US launch of Google Jobs last year, Google CEO Pichai Sundar announced that the purpose of the tool was to “better connect employers and job seekers”.

Users are able to filter roles by key criteria such as necessary qualifications and experience, working hours, salary and commute. Recruiters and employment platforms currently working with Google Jobs include LinkedIn, Monster, Glassdoor and Payscale (but interestingly, not Indeed).

The impact on recruitments companies will be severe. Even if you were ranking #1, you will now have the Google Jobs ‘import’ sitting above you plus the usual PPC ads.

While it’s safe to assume that Google will weight Google Jobs above all other recruitment platforms, it is worth bearing in mind that the company recently received a $5 billion fine from the EU for abusing their Android dominance, so they may – initially at least – proceed with more caution than usual.

What does this mean for my job vacancy?

Google Jobs pulls through vacancies from many recruitment company sites and jobs boards. Unfortunately, at the time of writing, there isn’t the ability to get your (a SMEs) specific role featured in the platform without posting it on one of these jobs sites/boards.

For businesses who have steered clear of these in the past, now may be the time to start to signing up.

We can assume Google Jobs’ popularity is only going to increase so if you want to maximize the chance of your vacancy being seen, don’t get left behind.

 

Read More

Ask Yoast: Can Google deal with Lazy Load?

Ask Yoast: Can Google deal with Lazy Load?

We’ve said it time and again: site speed is a crucial aspect of your SEO. That’s why we often write about site speed tools, speed optimization, and other things you need to know to make your site lightning fast. One factor in site speed is image optimization: on most sites, images will play a part in loading times. So, giving your image SEO some thought will pay off.

Want to bump your SEO to a higher level? Become a technical SEO expert with our Technical SEO training! »

$199 – Buy now » Info

Besides resizing and compressing your images to improve loading times, there’s the option to implement ‘lazy loading’ on your site. Lazy loading means that an image or object on your site doesn’t load until it appears in your visitor’s browser. For example: if a page has 8 images, only those that appear ‘above the fold’ load right away, while the others load as the user scrolls down. This can significantly improve speed, especially on pages that contain a lot of images. There are several plugins you can use to add lazy loading to your WordPress site. But is there really no catch? Will Google still index all your images?

MaAnna emailed us, wondering exactly that:

I’m testing the lazy load image function in WP Rocket. In online testers like WebPage Test, the waterfall doesn’t show the images loading, but when I do a Fetch and Render in Google Search Console all images on a page are shown. Can Google deal with lazy load and still index our images, as Fetch and Render seems to indicate?

Watch the video or read the transcript further down the page for my answer!

Can Google deal with Lazy Load?

“Yes, it can. It renders the page, it waits a bit and it scrolls down the page a bit to generate all the events that it needs to generate to make sure that it has loaded the entire page.

So yes, it can deal with that. You’re very fine using something like that lazy load image function. Google actually has code itself as well, in which it promotes the lazy loading of images because it really enhances people’s experience because pages get faster using lazy load. So, by all means, do use it. Use it well. Good luck!”

Ask Yoast

In the series Ask Yoast, we answer SEO questions from our readers. Do you have an SEO-related question? A pressing SEO dilemma to which you can’t find the answer? Send an email to [email protected], and your question may be featured in one of our weekly Ask Yoast vlogs.

Note: you may want to check our blog and knowledge base first, the answer to your question could already be out there! For urgent questions, for example about the Yoast SEO plugin not working properly, please contact us through our support page.

Read more: Does site speed influence SEO? »

The post Ask Yoast: Can Google deal with Lazy Load? appeared first on Yoast.

Read More

Out now: Keyword research training!

Out now: Keyword research training!

As of today, there’s finally an online Yoast Academy training course on a crucial aspect of SEO: keyword research! We’re so excited! And judging from the comments we got when we announced the training course, so are many of our visitors. And you should be, as well! In the Keyword research training, you’ll find out what keywords are most effective for your site. And how you can rank for those words!

You can get the course for $129, but only in the first week, so don’t wait too long!

Find out how to rank for your most important keywords with our Keyword research training »

$129 – Buy now » Info

Get the new Keyword research training Now$149 $129 (ex VAT) for course, certificate and badge
Why should I be excited about the Keyword research training?

Doing keyword research is not an option, it’s essential. It forms the basis of everything SEO. Without keywords, Google can’t make sense of your copy. Without keywords, there is nothing to build a site structure around. Without keywords, technical optimization is basically pointless. Do you want to know which words your audience uses to find you? Are you frustrated with competing with sites you just can’t seem to beat? Are you ranking for keywords, but not getting any traffic? The keyword research training will solve these problems for you.

What will I learn in the Keyword research training?

The Keyword research training course is an online training you’ll get access to for a full year. You’ll go through every step of the actual keyword research process. In each module, world-renowned SEO experts like Joost de Valk and Jono Alderson provide you with theory, best practices and tips. Then, you can apply your new knowledge immediately, by building your own keyword list step by step.

First, you’ll make a business profile with your mission and unique selling points (USPs). After that, you’ll draft your first list of keywords. Then, you’ll assess the potential traffic, potential conversion and potential to rank top 3 for your keywords.

At the end of the course, you’ll end up with a keyword list to start creating pages and copy for your most effective keywords immediately! And no worries if you’re short on time, you can also just focus on the theory. By the way, you don’t need any previous knowledge to take this training course. We start with the very basics. Nor do you need to use any paid tools: all of the tools we discuss are free.

Get feedback on your strategy!

When you’ve completed your keyword list, you may want to confirm you’re on the right track. That’s why we offer feedback on your work if you want it. If you choose the feedback package, a Yoast expert will check your keyword list within two weeks, and provide feedback on your keywords and their potential. This way, you can make sure your keyword list will help you rank for your most efficient keywords!

Get the Keyword research training with feedback Now$199 $179 (ex VAT) for training and feedback
Conclusion

The Keyword research training provides you with all the tools you need to get the first step in SEO right. In fact, the Keyword research training even goes beyond SEO. You’ll also learn a lot about content marketing in general. It’s a great way to kickstart or recharge your SEO strategy, whether you maintain a blog, an e-commerce site, or any other type of website. Make sure your content gets the attention it deserves by taking the Yoast Academy Keyword research training! You can get it by simply clicking the button below. It is currently available for $129, so get it before the offer expires!

Get the new Keyword research training NowOnly $149 $129 (ex VAT) to master the essential first step of SEO

The post Out now: Keyword research training! appeared first on Yoast.

Read More