Posts by Greggor

Why Your WordPress Site Doesn’t Rank High on Google

A website is critical to the success of your online business – it’s the first thing users will look for, so you have to make sure they can find you easily. Search engine optimization (SEO) is the only way to achieve this.

Ergo it is essential to understand the cause of low ranking, so let’s take a look!

GOOGLE HASN’T INDEXED YOUR WEBSITE

This happens to newly-launched WordPress sites since it takes a few weeks for this search engine giant to detect and list you.

Simply search ‘site:’ and add your domain name after it in the search box. If your website shows up as the first result, Google has indexed it, but if you can’t find it, then it may take a few days before you find it using that search query.

META TAGS ARE POORLY OPTIMIZED

Meta tags are website components that allow Google to analyze and rank your content. You have to make sure meta tags are crafted properly:

. Meta description: explains webpage content (up to 160 characters)
. Meta title: another way to keep Google informed about the content
. Image tags: visual elements are also crawled and analyzed, so make sure to mark images adequately.

WEBSITE’S NOT MOBILE-FRIENDLY

Your job is to build a responsive site that functions perfectly across multiple devices. This is best done by using a new, mobile-friendly theme, but it can also be done plugin-wise (WPTouch and JetPack being just two examples).

YOUR CONTENT IS BAD

Content is one thing that really has the power to make or break your online efforts. A typical first-page result on Google contains almost 2,000 words, so today’s users want to see, read, or hear in-depth analyses – it covers topics from all angles, giving visitors a thorough explanation of the topic in question.

YOU HAVE NO BACKLINKS

If no one shares or wants to share links that lead back to your website, it probably means you aren’t publishing quality content. Google takes it into account and labels your site as irrelevant, so you can’t rank much higher in user searches.

YOUR SITE LOADS SLOWLY

visitors typically expect a web page to load in less than three seconds. What you need to do make that possible is test your site’s load speed (such as Pingdom). These tests will show you everything you can do to make your site load faster.

YOU DON’T HAVE ANY SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITY

Social buzz improves the visibility of pages, so if you don’t have business accounts on platforms like Facebook or Instagram, you should start using them right away.

YOU HAVE TOO MANY AFFILIATE LINKS

Websites that focus on affiliate marketing instead of quality content are going to get penalized by Google sooner or later.

TOUGH COMPETITION

Lastly, competition may be too tough for a certain keyword. If that’s the case, focus on a less competitive niche by targeting the right audience and finding keywords that won’t overlap with the ones used by industry leaders.

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Reducing WordPress Site CPU Usage

While it’s praised for its ease of use and user-friendliness, it can also be resource-hungry. Fortunately there are simple fixes to said issue.

AVOID FANCY DESIGNS AND ANY GIMMICKS YOU WON’T BE USING

Make sure first and foremost that your website is fast-loading and message-focused before elegence – otherwise, you’re going to have a site that doesn’t convert well. Having a slider, for example, is nice but you will have to resize the images considerably so it doesn’t slow nearly everything (literally) down.

CHECK YOUR WEBSITE PLUGINS CAREFULLY

Sometimes what’s most resource-demanding is hidden behind the scenes because of plugins. Disable them one by one and test your site’s performance; then verify CPU usage when they’re turned off. Doing this will show you which you need to remove or replace.

OPTIMIZE IMAGES

Just as mentioned regarding your slider/s, if you don’t optimize them, they will demand their share of resources, rendering WordPress to operate less than optimally. We recommend a plugin call “resmush.it” which is very fast at such a process, and optimizes images upon upload.

GET A CONTENT DELIVERY NETWORK

By doing so, like using Cloudflare for instance, certain static files on your site (images, videos, etc.) are loaded from external servers, leaving more power for WordPress. Ergo, usage spikes are prevented.

CLEAN THE DATABASE REGULARLY

It’s not just the WP database that must be taken care of – many plugins grow in size over time by cluttering said database and require regular cleanups. There are plenty of plugins available for database cleanups and don’t require technical knowledge.

GET A CACHING PLUGIN

Instead of generating content every time a particular user visits your website, such a plugin will create static versions of your site’s webpages. Therefore, CPU usage is decreased even further.

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How to Fix HTTP Errors Uploading Images

One of the most annoying things that can happen to your WordPress site is an HTTP error when trying to upload images – there are many ways to deal with this issue.

CHECK IF THE ERROR REALLY EXISTS

Basically, just wait for a few minutes and then check if the error comes up again, because the error may only be temporary.

TRY USING ANOTHER BROWSER

If the error still comes up, the second easiest option is just to switch between browsers. Google Chrome can often disable image uploading, so just try Firefox, Opera, etc.

DEACTIVATE PLUGINS

HTTP errors like this one could happen right after installing a plugin, particularly if it’s for image optimization. Try even disabling other plugins before trying to upload your picture once more.

INCREASE THE MEMORY LIMIT

Problems in WordPress can be easily caused by memory limits – this can be easily fixed by adding the following code to wp-config.php:

define (‘WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’, ‘256M’);

By using this solution you will be solving your image upload problem and then some along the way, especially if your theme uses a lot of resources.

SWITCH BETWEEN IMAGE EDITORS

WordPress uses two image editors interchangeably: Imagick and GD Library. Imagick has the tendency to drain memory and henceforth cause HTTP errors. Just add the following code to your theme’s functions.php file:

function wpb_image_editor_default_to_gd( $editors ) {
$gd_editor = ‘WP_Image_Editor_GD’;
$editors = array_diff( $editors, array( $gd_editor ) );
array_unshift( $editors, $gd_editor );
return $editors;
}
add_filter( ‘wp_image_editors’, ‘wpb_image_editor_default_to_gd’ );

USE .HTACCESS

If you still want to use Imagick you can use another trick to prevent HTTP errors, which is to add this line of code to .htaccess:

SetEnv MAGICK_THREAD_LIMIT 1

CHECK YOUR THEME

Much like plugins, WordPress themes can also cause this HTTP error. Just try a different theme and see if the error still comes up.

UPGRADE PHP VERSION

If your hosting service is using an older PHP version, you’ll likely end up running into HTTP errors like this one and then some. If you can’t upgrade the PHP version from your control panel, you should either choose a more advanced service or change your provider entirely.

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WordPress Tips & Tricks from Pros

With nearly 55 thousand plugins, you can hardly find a single WordPress function that can’t be updated or improved; however, it is necessary to understand the most important functions.

1. MAKE USE OF ONLINE LEARNING SOURCES

There are plenty of websites that can help you learn WordPress back-to-back, such as WP Beginner.

2. KEEP THINGS SIMPLE

You don’t want to start out with complex features right away – just take care of basics before you move on to advanced functions.

3. CHOOSE A GOOD THEME

Find a WordPress theme that blends with your branding strategy and gives you the ability to make changes easily and adapt it according to your own needs.

4. REMOVE SPAM COMMENTS

A WordPress site’s not going to look professional with spam messages, so just go over to “comments” (right under “pages” in your WordPress dashboard) and delete any spammy comments.

5. UNDERSTAND THE FUNDAMENTALS OF SEO

Search engine optimization is what’s needed for higher ranking in Google searches, so you’ll have to understand keywords, slugs, and meta-descriptions.

6. INCREASE YOUR MEMORY LIMIT

Plugins can slow your site down by draining memory, so simply open the wp-config.php file and enter the following line of code:
define(‘WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’, ’64M’);

7. TAKE CARE OF WEBSITE SECURITY

Don’t jeopardize months or even years of content creation. Create strong passwords and use a reliable security plugin such as “All-in-One WP Security” or “Wordfence”.

8. DELETE OBSOLETE PLUGINS

Sometimes inactive plugins can also increase the risk of a website hack, so just delete the ones you don’t use or don’t plan to reactivate.

9. HIGHLIGHT AUTHOR COMMENTS

Your content needs to hook the audience to your site, and one trick is to highlight authors’ comments. Write this simple code in the CSS file:
.bypostauthor { background: #eee; }

10. MAKE SIMPLE SITE STRUCTURES

Make your site easy to navigate by making a simple site structure with up to 6 main categories.

11. INCREASE LOAD SPEED

You can do it using online tools like “Pingdom”, a site that shows what’s fast or slow and what can be done in terms of improvement.

12. ADD SOCIAL ICONS

This’ll help visitors spread the word about your site through their accounts on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.

13. SET WEBSITE BACKUPS REGULARLY

This keeps your content safe and sound in spite of potential site hacks or technical issues like a sudden 500 error.

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Checking to Ensure Your WordPress Site is Secure

You invest a lot of effort and time to keep your site secure. You’ve chosen a reliable host, and you’ve installed some plugins that ensure better security. Now what? Is your site now safe?

Here are a handful of things you can do to make sure your WordPress Site is secure.

PASSWORDS
This one’s obvious: you have to choose a strong password. But: are they unguessable? A password update won’t do any harm if you haven’t changed it in a while.

You could use a password generator (available in WordPress’ “Your Profile” page under “Users), but there’s also “Two-Factor Authentication”, which can be a CAPTCHA, text-message verification, a question to verify it’s you (e.g. “Birthplace”, “name of first pet”, etc.), and much more. Most security plugins like “All-in-One WP Security” have such options available.

ATTACK SURFACES
When someone decides to hack a website, they attack what’s called an “attack surface”, which can be the web applications, themes, and plugins on your website.

Remove any themes, plugins or accounts you don’t or aren’t going to use.

BACKUPS
No one really thinks about backups until a hack occurs. “BackWPUp” is a plugin we highly recommend so you can be ready for a potential attack and you can restore your site with ease.

FIREWALLS
Attacks can happen at anytime. “All-in-One WP Security” has this and much more!

USERS AND THEIR ROLES
Who else has access to your WordPress site? Remove any users that are no longer needed.

SECURITY PLUGINS
This can’t be stressed enough, but “All-in-One WP Security” and others like “WordFence” have plenty to offer such as password checking, malware scanning, the afore-mentioned two-step authentication features, checks for outdated plugins / themes, and much more.

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