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Metrics to Help Maximize The Value of Your Content

Posted by on Jul 2, 2019 in Greg's SEO Articles | Comments Off on Metrics to Help Maximize The Value of Your Content

Companies are making a large amount of content without considering which works and which doesn’t. There are metrics that can be used to find that out.

CONTENT PRODUCTION CYCLE HEALTH

In this case you need to track:

. The average length of production – start tracking time from the start of your content creation to the end of it.
. Delivery rates – track what content’s delivered on time and what’s late.
. Content coverage gaps – you need to first align your content to be in the consumer’s interest/s.

THE REACH OF YOUR CONTENT

In this case you need to:

. Measure engagement by each type
. Measure traffic by sales channel category
. Measure referrals
. Measure engagement by content type
. Measure engagement by sales stages
. Measure engagement based on buyer persona.

Internal metrics are important as well. Make sure to look at:

. Month-to-month internal views
. Month-to-month internal downloads
. Internal shares
. Shares of asset via email or social
. Referrals earned

THE ROI OF YOUR CONTENT

Content scoring measures how effective your content is or is going to be at getting conversions. You have to:

. Define alignment on the buyer’s journey – this means you make content based on what your consumers are or will be interested in.
. Assign scores to content types – the first and the last sort of content you publish should have a score placed on them based on how effective each is.

Today’s customer decision journey is so complex but AI can help

Posted by on Jun 28, 2019 in SEO Articles | Comments Off on Today’s customer decision journey is so complex but AI can help

Myth: “The customer journey is not as complex as it’s made out to be.” One thing is for sure – the consumer decision journey is more complex than ever before. The average consumer now owns three to four devices and uses multiple online and offline channels throughout their shopping journeys. The game is changing as marketers turn to artificial intelligence, agencies and data to help them navigate new consumer behavior. Every marketer today needs to be addressing these challenges as the CDJ itself is disrupting the digital landscape.

For instance, consumers are increasingly turning to mobile devices throughout their journey to gather coupons, compare prices and read about products. Nearly 60% of shoppers research products and prices via mobile while in store and 87% of shoppers think brands need to build a more seamless shopping experience.

Consumers are also researching online and then converting in-store. In fact, according to a recent Harvard Business Review study, 73% of the shoppers studied used multiple channels throughout their journey. Consider these stats:

  • 50% of shoppers expect to make a purchase online and pick up in-store.
  • 71% of shoppers agree that it is important or very important to be able to view inventory information online for in-store products.
  • 45% of shoppers in-store to be knowledgeable about online-only products.
  • 87% of customers want a seamless experience and think brands need to put more effort into providing one.
  • Nearly 60% of shoppers use their mobile phones to look up product information and prices in stores.

You can see from these stats, omnichannel is here to stay as consumers jump between devices and online/offline activity. To make things even more complicated, at any point, consumers could be on the verge of conversion on one device while receiving early-funnel messaging on another. Today’s marketers must embrace omnichannel fundamentals, such as offering in-store pick-up online and optimizing mobile campaigns for a variety of KPIs such as downloads and views.

The new CDJ takes shape

While early marketing efforts and attribution models (first-click/last-click/linear/time decay) tended to oversimplify the CDJ, that is certainly no longer the case. The new CDJ has evolved to look less like a straight line and more like an intergalactic star with more data points than a single person could count. For example, this is an actual representation of just one data set of recent search queries on Bing related to “enterprise cloud software.”

When zooming in, one can see the myriad of keyword searches in color-coded clusters.

AI is no longer an option, but a requirement for experiencing success with today’s CDJ.

Here are some tips for creating hyper-personalized touchpoints in modern journeys:

  • Leverage cloud platforms and share data across all departments for greater customer insights.
  • Bring together first-party and third-party data signals to create holistic views of the customer.
  • Partner with technology providers and advertising platforms that can analyze the impact of online advertising to offline conversions.
  • Focus less on a path-to-purchase and more on an evolved path-to-identity.
  • Make all touchpoints shoppable (Instagram/chatbots/local inventory ads).

The post Today’s customer decision journey is so complex but AI can help appeared first on Search Engine Land.

How to develop content your target audience actually wants

Posted by on Jun 27, 2019 in SEO Articles | Comments Off on How to develop content your target audience actually wants

In the ebb and flow of content marketing trend analyses comes the return of the “content fatigue” narrative. We’re told content marketing doesn’t work as well as it used to, that it’s redundant and that there’s too much of it.

But as long as we have the Internet, content is going to be the playing field for our sport. We need to focus on making better content. Not less, not more—just better.

In this issue of Agency Perspectives from Sharpspring, you’ll learn:

  • How to develop content your target audience actually wants
  • Tips on sharing and distributing content across relevant channels
  • How to use marketing automation to optimize your content

Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download “Mission Possible: Quality Content Marketing.”

The post How to develop content your target audience actually wants appeared first on Search Engine Land.

Leveraging WP Site Traffic

Posted by on Jun 27, 2019 in Greg's SEO Articles | Comments Off on Leveraging WP Site Traffic

Let’s say you’ve just created a new blog for business purposes – now you need users to visit it and check out your content, products, or services. Attracting high-quality traffic is very difficult due to competition. Here are a handful of tips to attract said traffic.

FOLLOW GOOGLE’S GUIDELINES

“Google Webmasters” provides plenty of recommendations for content on your website, but here are just a few of those:

. Write with the Readers’ Interests in Mind

A hard-sell copy isn’t going to work because users tend to like reader-focused content. Write something that the target audience is interested in reading. Customer-centered content is also good too.

. Post Regularly

You do have to post something at least once a week.

TRY TO MAKE CONTENT THAT CAN GO VIRAL

Often, a certain subject or event ends up getting talked about vigorously, so articles and other content pieces that contribute to that conversation get a lot of attention. If you would like to try making this so-called “viral content” yourself, here are two ways you can do that:

. Use a Content Discovery Tool to Identify Popular Topics

This’ll help find the best-performing content pieces on the Internet. You can even search for these pieces using keywords pertaining to your blog and adjusting the time period.

. Use the Most Common Features of Viral Content

This has to be: Content written on positive topics that invoke amusement, laughter, and awe; Video reviews of popular products or services; articles that start with “Top 10” etc.; and, Quizzes, generators, and other interactive content.

CREATE INTERESTING HEADLINES

Headlines are tremendously important because they’ll intrigue visitors into more likely visiting your blog or post. In order to do that you’ll need to:

Refer to readers in your headlines, e.g. use “you” and “your”
Use promising words like “free,” “easy,” “better,” etc.
Use numbers, e.g. “5 Things You Should Say to Your Loved One Right Now,” “4 Signs He’s Cheating on You,” “8 Things You Need to Know about the New iPhone,” etc.

LINK BETWEEN POSTS

The reason to do this is because it makes visitors spend more time on your website and explore it. Amazon.com does the same thing with “Similar Products”. Also, having internal links allows for increased traffic by having people visit more pages on your blog.

COLLECT VISITORS’ EMAILS

Email marketing’s a great way to provide people with new content on demand. A lot of websites have a subscription form for this exact reason. Get a subscription form set whereever possible.

OPTIMIZE FOR SPEED AND MOBILE

This one is obvious and stated before but couldn’t be any more important. Users want things fast and they want a website to be readable, something that’s impossible without a mobile-friendly website design.

SHARE POSTS ON SOCIAL MEDIA

This is great for increasing your content’s visibility! Make sure to use visuals whenever you place new content on Facebook, Twitter, etc. Also make sure to Interact with those who engage with your posts.

WRITE EVERGREEN CONTENT

Evergreen content is simply content that stays relevant for long periods of time. News gets irrelavent very fast, so don’t write about it unless it’s company-specific news (business anniversary, new product/service, etc.)

How I Grew My Dying Facebook Traffic

Posted by on Jun 25, 2019 in SEO Articles | Comments Off on How I Grew My Dying Facebook Traffic

facebook

Is it me, or does Facebook just want to keep you on Facebook?

Every time I post a link to my site, I get less and less traffic. And it’s been this way for years.

In other words, my organic reach on Facebook was dying.

And to make matters worse, they give you hope every time they launch a new feature.

For example, when they launched Facebook Live, you used to be able to get tons of views because they promoted it organically… but not really anymore.

The same goes with Facebook Watch. I used to easily get 30,000 plus views per video when Facebook Watch came out… again, not anymore.

Now I am lucky to get 10,000 views.

But hey, I can’t really hate on Facebook. They are a business and they have to do what’s best for them. So instead of getting upset at Facebook, I decided to run some tests to see if I could find a way to get more organic traffic.

Because there has to be a way, right?

Well, there is. 🙂

And here is my traffic from Facebook over the last 7 days:

facebook traffic

That may not seem like a big increase, but I generated 10,621 visitors the month before. In other words, I took my Facebook traffic from 10,621 visitors PER MONTH to 10,085 visitors PER WEEK.

I am getting roughly the same amount of traffic I used to get in 30 days from Facebook, now in just 7 days.

So how did I do this?

Taking control of your own destiny

As marketers, our faith typically relies on the big giants… you know, Google, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram…

If they decide to change their algorithms your traffic could go up, down, or stay flat.

For that reason, over the last few years, I’ve been building up marketing channels that aren’t as reliant on algorithms.

For example, you may learn about new blog posts I publish through my email lists because every time I publish a new post, I usually send out an email blast.

Or it could be through browser notifications.

subscribers

Every time I release a blog post or a video… again, I send a message out through push notifications.

But why can’t we do the same with Facebook?

Sure, you can post on your wall or page like everyone else, but if Facebook doesn’t want to show it to people they don’t have to.

So, I decided to push really hard on Facebook Messenger, which gives you the same ability.

In other words, you can send a direct message to everyone on Facebook through their chat feature and share a message or a link to your website.

Something that isn’t too controlled by an algorithm… similar to text messaging or email marketing.

I built this list of 129,560 Facebook Messenger contacts and leveraged them to continually generate traffic back to my blog.

Now before I break down the exact steps I took to do this, the tactics here take execution and elbow grease. It isn’t rocket science, it’s not hard to do, but it does take a bit of work.

But first, let’s go over how Facebook Messenger marketing works.

Facebook Messenger

grow facebook messenger list

First, let’s back up on why Facebook Messenger is working so well today.

Facebook Messenger open rates are 50-80% click-through rates post elite stats.

When you send an email campaign, you can expect a 20% open rate on a really good day. On average, I get 28 to 31% with my NeilPatel.com email list.

In other words, if you send your email newsletter to 100 people, 20 people will open it. If you scrub your list and work really hard like me, roughly 30 people will open it, which still isn’t great.

However, when you send a Messenger message to 100 people, 88 people will open it and read it.

We’re talking about an 88% open rate on Messenger. That is crazy!!!!

Now over time, you will notice that it will go down, but it is still substantially higher than email.

But here is where it really gets interesting.

With email marketing, you’ll typically see a 2% to a 4% click-through rate. So for every 100 emails you send, you will get 2 to 4 clicks back to your site.

To give you a benchmark, again, I spend a lot of time fine-tuning my emails and I can get about 6 clicks for every 100 emails I send.

Better than the 2 to 4 percent most people get, but still not life-changing.

With Messenger? You can get 20% click rates.

Over time, you will see it go down, but it is still substantially higher than email marketing.

And it is not just marketing, it works with pretty much any industry. Here’s an example of a real estate company that leverages Facebook Messenger:

As you can see from the screenshot above, Facebook Messenger works like how you would chat with a friend on Facebook or even email. You don’t always have to promote or link, you could just have a conversation with a friend.

This is why their adoption rate is continually climbing in the United States.

That’s almost 140 million users that are projected to use Messenger.

Messaging apps are also surpassing social networks in popularity. Just ask yourself… how many times do you use WhatsApp each week?

But the key is to start now because it will become saturated just like every other marketing channel that works. So whoever builds the biggest list early on will have the best shot of doing well in the long run.

If you are already leveraging Messenger, great, just skip to the tips below to start growing your Facebook traffic.

If you aren’t, just like email marketing you are going to need software so you can send the messages on Facebook. You can start off with this free software called MobileMonkey.

Now let’s get into how you can build your Messenger list and get consistent Facebook traffic.

Tactic #1: Website Messenger widget

My own tests have shown that chat on a website can boost conversions 45%.

So I wondered, what would happen if I installed a Messenger bot on a website?

What’s great about adding this is that visitors get answers to their questions immediately, 24/7. Say goodbye to conversion bottlenecks.

But also, everyone who starts a chat on the site becomes a new contact in my Messenger list.

So how does this work?

Add a Facebook Messenger bot to your website with a widget.

Everyone who visits your website is invited to become a Messenger contact. Website traffic turns into Messenger contacts.

Most users are already logged into Messenger on their desktop or device. So when they have questions or want info and see the Messenger widget, they tap it and boom — new Messenger contact.

If your site is on WordPress site like 34% of the world’s sites, a WordPress plugin called WP-Chatbot is the quickest way to add Facebook Messenger chat to your site.

Install the plugin on your WordPress site and you’ll have Messenger chat on your site in just a few minutes.

This widget makes list building easy. An active website could get hundreds or thousands of new contacts from the visitors on the site who engage the chatbot every day.

Think about yourself.

Are you more likely to search for a contact form on a site, fill it out, and sit back and wait who knows how long for an answer to your question?

Or are you more likely to pop open the chat window, ask your question, and get an immediate response?

Tactic #2: Run Facebook click to Messenger ads

You can do a lot without leveraging paid traffic, but if you really want to put some fuel on the fire, a few hundred dollars goes a long way.

And for the purpose of this blog post, I spent $391.58 just so I would have some stats to share with you. 🙂

Facebook Messenger ads are a Facebook Ad format in which the user who clicks on the ad is immediately added to your Messenger contact list as opposed to going to a landing page where they may bounce or exit, anonymously.

Everyone who clicks the button on the ad converts when they send the advertiser a message — becoming a permanent Messenger contact.

The key part is… they need to send the advertiser a message. In other words, if you don’t get them to send you a message they won’t be added to your Messenger contact list so you won’t be able to send blasts to them.

That’s why you want to use an autoresponder. If which you automatically start talking to each person to increase your chance that they will get added to your contact list.

Here’s an example of an ad:

How much will Facebook click-to-Messenger ads run you?

I personally haven’t scaled a campaign too large yet, but with a $391.58 test budget, I’ve been able to generate leads for roughly 62% less than traditional Facebook ads.

But again, the key with all of this is in the autoresponder. Without that, your numbers won’t be too great.

Within MobileMonkey, use the bot content builder to create the autoresponder to your Facebook Ad.

Then create a new Messenger ad in MobileMonkey to connect your autoresponder to your Facebook Ad.

Next, pick the autoresponder from a drop-down of all your bot dialogues and connect it to your Facebook Ads Manager account.

The result is a low-cost ad campaign that drives more contacts into your Messenger list.

Facebook Messenger ads work time and again across industries, including e-commerce and service businesses.

Now, if you are like me and you prefer to do things a bit more organically and save some money, here’s how you generate more contacts without spending money.

Tactic #3: Use organic Facebook post autoresponders

Growing your list with a little ad spend goes a long way, but this next list building power tactic is totally free.

Anyone who comments on your Facebook Page posts instantly becomes your Messenger contact.

A Facebook post autoresponder adds people to your Messenger contact list if they comment on any Facebook post.

Here’s how it works.

  1. You post to your Facebook Business Page.
  2. Someone comments.
  3. A Messenger bot automatically responds and as soon as that person replies, they’ve become a contact in Messenger.

You can see an example of this tactic in action here:

The more engaging your Facebook post, the more likely it will be that people will want to comment on it.

These kinds of posts always get a ton of comments and contacts:

  • Quizzes
  • Contests
  • Riddles

You could ask fans to post a GIF in response to a question. “Describe your boss with a GIF.”

Or ask them to tell a story or ask them a question like “What industry are most of your clients in?”

Even just asking them “what do you do?” is super-engaging because people love to talk about themselves!

This store asks fans to name how many duck species are in the photo. Comment with your guess and get a discount code in the autoresponder follow-up.

You can create the Messenger dialog for this technique in MobileMonkey with the “FB Comment Guard” tool.

That feature is what allows you to add the autoresponder to an organic post.

I love this technique because it converts my hard-fought organic Facebook engagement into a list of contacts I can follow up with.

Tactic #4: Convert page fans into Messenger contacts

I’m a fan of cross-promoting, traffic-sharing, and allowing various marketing channels to build off each other.

After all, if someone follows you on one channel, they may want your updates on a different channel as well. This increases your odds of connecting with them and amplifying your content reach at any given time.

This tactic combines several methodologies for a boost to Messenger contacts.

If you’ve gone to the effort of building a robust Facebook page, you will want to convert these fans into Messenger contacts. Fans are great, but Messenger contacts are better because Messenger is personalized, interactive, one-on-one, and has way more visibility than Facebook News Feed.

Organic reach on Facebook is very low. Maybe 1%, of your fans on your Facebook Page will even see your post.

Using Facebook Messenger changes this. Instead of a low organic reach, you’re getting high-powered interactions that are personalized.

This is important because page fans aren’t automatically Messenger contacts. You have to invite them or connect with them in Messenger first.

Here are three ways to convert your Page fans into Messenger contacts.

First, and this one is pretty obvious, you can change the CTA button on your Facebook Page to “Send Message”.

Right now your Facebook Page CTA button might be sending traffic to your site with a button like “Learn More”.

Hover over the button until you see “Edit Button.” Then choose the option to “Contact you” and “Send Message.”

Customize the message that people will see when they click that button in MobileMonkey.

Boom. Now anyone who clicks the “Send Message” button from a Facebook Page will become a Messenger contact.

Second, create a Facebook Post Autoresponder (see tip #3).

This autoresponder was a simple invitation — Stay in touch! Sign up for Messenger updates.

Third, you can then use Page fan audience targeting of a click-to-Messenger Facebook Ad campaign.

Remember, your existing Page fans are more likely to take another step into more interaction with a brand that they know and trust.

Tactic #5: Turn your email subscribers into Messenger contacts

Email marketing has a low engagement rate.

Facebook Messenger has high engagement.

Would you rather send your content to your subscribers in a channel with a 2% click-rate or 20% click-through rate?

Ideally, you should do what I do and leverage them both.

Send your email list an invitation to join your Facebook Messenger list. Those who choose to do so will become email subscribers and Messenger subscribers, but their engagement level (and therefore your reach) will increase using Messenger.

One of the most effective marketing methods is to convert your existing contacts into more effective marketing channels.

Using MobileMonkey’s chatbot builder, you can create an opt-in page consisting of a quick and simple “Want to receive occasional updates?” invitation.

Link to that invitation anywhere you’d normally include a link.

Link to that invitation in a button, like the examples below.

And here:

Link to your Messenger experience in your:

  • Email signature
  • CTAs in blog posts
  • Business card in QR codes
  • Landing pages
  • Newsletter subscription forms

The list is as long as you are clever. And it works very well!

Conclusion

You are always going to deal with algorithms, but if you want more consistent traffic you need to take matters into your own hands.

Just look at me, I leverage email marketing, push notifications, and even Facebook Messenger marketing.

I’m now looking into leveraging text messaging too.

Sure, I leverage SEO, content marketing, paid ads, social media marketing… and every other major channel out there.

But I focus a large part of my efforts on controlling my own destiny and you can too.

If you haven’t started, start with Facebook Messenger. It works so well right now and I expect it to last for a while. The key is getting in on the right time and time is right now.

So what do you think about this strategy? Have you tried Facebook Messenger marketing yet?

The post How I Grew My Dying Facebook Traffic appeared first on Neil Patel.

Best WP SEO Plugins

Posted by on Jun 21, 2019 in Greg's SEO Articles | Comments Off on Best WP SEO Plugins

There are plenty of great plug-ins, but the ones on this list will enhance your SEO efforts.

1. SEO Yoast

This plugin’s probably one of the most used and popular WordPress SEO plugins by over five million websites. One of its best features is the XML sitemap management which allows you to easily create your own sitemaps. You don’t have to code and then fix it if something in’t working.

For content lovers, there’s the content optimization snippet preview which allows you to add your keyword, meta description and meta title to preview them as they appear on search. You also get tips and indications whether your content needs more on-site optimization, including reduction of keyword stuffing.

Moreover, Yoast SEO helps you identify and avoid duplicate content so you don’t get penalized by Google.

2. SEO Framework

Here’s another great plugin for small businesses instead of big companies. The interface looks like it’s integrated into WordPress, so it delivers fast SEO solutions and it’s time efficient. Not to mention that interacting with it feels very natural.

It has an AI built making it very interesting and it automatically optimizes your pages, so it gives you lots of possibilities to create a better website. It comes preconfigured but also gives you the option to change any settings you want. You can improve search results and the social presence too.

3. Broken Link Checker

This plugin parses your whole website and shows you how many broken links you have. You can find said list in a new tab of the WP admin panel – “Tools” -> “Broken Links”. Whenever you find them, there are some actions you can take: “Edit link”, “Unlink”, “Not broken”, and “Dismiss”.

4. All in One Schema Rich Snippets

This plugin can be used to improve the appearance in search engine results with rich snippets. The plugin can be used at its best for schema implementations, such as Recipes, Events, People, Products, Articles and so on.

Using it will give more accurate information to search engines about your website, help your results stand out in SERP and give you a competitive advantage.

5. Rank Math

This plugin helps you optimize your content and outrank your competitors. One of the coolest things is that it supports schema-based themes and also AMP pages.

With Rank Math you can check lots of errors and get a lot of information for your website:

. easy setup using the step-by-step installation and configuration wizard;
. rank tracking option to follow your keywords positions and LSI keyword integration;
. advanced website analysis section to spot any errors that need to be fixed;
. a modular framework so you can have complete control of your website;
. smart redirection manager;
. 40 monitor that identifies and fixes any 404 pages;
. internal linking management and suggestion;
. Google Search Console Integration;
. Easy configuration for rich snippets and so many more.

6. All in One SEO Pack

Here’s an easy WordPress plugin for beginners and small businesses that want to improve their website and increase their rankings, but it does has advanced features and an API for developers; for example:

. XML Sitemap support;
. Google AMP support;
. Google Analytics Integration;
. Webmaster verification options for Google, Bing, and Pinterest;
. Automatically generated meta tags;
. Built-in API and compatibility with a lot of other plugins;
. advanced canonical URLs and many more.

7. SEOPress

This simple fast and very powerful SEO plugin has loads of features that you can easily enable or disable as per required:

. Discover your suggestion for your content through Google’s suggestion.
. Fine tune with a content analysis tool.
. You can track Google event and traffic from the dashboard.
. It is very easy to create and manage 301, 302 and 307 redirects.
. You will be able to check the performance of your site with Google page speed.
. It allows you to implement Google structured data, such as product, article, event, local business, review, video, course, recipe and so on.

What Your Google Tag Manager Container Should Contain – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by on Jun 19, 2019 in SEO Articles | Comments Off on What Your Google Tag Manager Container Should Contain – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by DiTomaso

Agencies, are you set up for ongoing Google Tag Manager success? GTM isn’t the easiest tool in the world to work with, but if you know how to use it, it can make your life much easier. Make your future self happier and more productive by setting up your GTM containers the right way today. Dana DiTomaso shares more tips and hints in this edition of Whiteboard Friday.

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hi, Moz fans. My name is Dana DiTomaso. I am President and partner at Kick Point, which is a digital marketing agency based in Edmonton, Alberta. Today I’m going to be talking to you about Google Tag Manager and what your default container in Google Tag Manager should contain. I think if you’re in SEO, there are certainly a lot of things Google Tag Manager can do for you.

But if you’ve kind of said to yourself, “You know, Google Tag Manager is not the easiest thing to work with,” which is fair, it is not, and it used to be a lot worse, but the newer versions are pretty good, then you might have been a little intimidated by going in there and doing stuff. But I really recommend that you include these things by default because later you is going to be really happy that current you put this stuff in. So I’m going to go through what’s in Kick Point’s default Google Tag Manager container, and then hopefully you can take some of this and apply it to your own stuff.

Agencies, if you are watching, you are going to want to create a default container and use it again and again, trust me. 

Tags

So we’re going to start with how this stuff is laid out. So what we have are tags and then triggers. The way that this works is the tag is sort of the thing that’s going to happen when a trigger occurs. 

Conversion linker

So tags that we have in our default container are the conversion linker, which is used to help conversions with Safari.

If you don’t know a lot about this, I recommend looking up some of the restrictions with Safari tracking and ITP. I think they’re at 2.2 at the time I’m recording this. So I recommend checking that out. But this conversion linker will help you get around that. It’s a default tag in Tag Manager, so you just add the conversion linker. There’s a nice article on Google about what it does and how it all works. 

Events

Then we need to track a number of events. You can certainly track these things as custom dimensions or custom metrics if that floats your boat. I mean that’s up to you. If you are familiar with using custom dimensions and custom metrics, then I assume you probably know how to do this. But if you’re just getting started with Tag Manager, just start with events and then you can roll your way up to being an expert after a while. 

External links

So under events, we always track external links, so anything that points out to a domain that isn’t yours.

The way that we track this is we’re looking at every single link that’s clicked and if it does not contain our client’s domain name, then we record it as an external link, and that’s an event that we record. Now remember, and I’ve seen accidents with this where someone doesn’t put in your client’s domain and then it tracks every single click to a different page on your client’s website as an external link. That’s bad.

When you transfer from HTTP to HTTPS, if you don’t update Google Tag Manager, it will start recording links incorrectly. Also bad. But what this is really useful for are things like when you link out to other websites, as you should when you’re writing articles, telling people to find out more information. Or you can track clicks out to your different social properties and see if people are actually clicking on that Facebook icon that you stuck in the header of your website. 

PDF downloads

The next thing to track are PDF downloads.

Now there’s a limitation to this, of course, in that if people google something and your PDF comes out and then they click on it directly from Google, of course that’s not going to show up in your Analytics. That can show up in Search Console, but you’re not going to get it in Analytics. So just keep that in mind. This is if someone clicks to your PDF from a specific page on your website. Again, you’re decorating the link to say if this link contains a PDF, then I want to have this.

Scroll tracking

Then we also track scroll tracking. Now scroll tracking is when people scroll down the site, you can track and fire an event at say 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the way down the page. Now the thing is with this is that your mileage is going to vary. You will probably pick different percentages. By default, in all of our containers we put 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. Based on the client, we might change this.

An advanced, sort of level up tactic would be to pick specific elements and then when they enter the viewport, then you can fire an event. So let’s say, for example, you have a really important call to action and because different devices are different sizes, it’s going to be a different percentage of the way down the page when it shows up, but you want to see if people got to that main CTA. Then you would want to add an event that would show whether or not that CTA was shown in the viewport.

If you google Google Tag Manager and tracking things in the viewport, there are some great articles out there on how to do it. It’s not that difficult to set up. 

Form submits

Then also form submits. Of course, you’re going to want to customize this. But by default put form submits in your container, because I guarantee that when someone is making your container let’s say for a brand-new website, they will forget about tracking form submits unless you put it in your default container and they look at it and say, “Oh, right, I have to edit that.” So always put form submits in there. 

Tel: & mailto: links</h4> <p>Of course you want to track telephone links and mailto: links. Telephone links should always, always be tappable, and that&#8217;s something that I see a lot of mistakes. Particularly in local SEO, when we&#8217;re dealing with really small business websites, they don&#8217;t make the telephone links tappable. It217;s probably because people don217;t know how. In case you don&#8217;t know how, you just telephone and then a colon and then the telephone number. </p> <pre>&lt;a href="tel:+5555555555">(555) 555-5555</a>

That’s it. That’s all you need to do. Just like a link, except rather than going out to an HTTPS://, you’re going out to a telephone number. That is going to make your visitors’ lives so much easier, particularly on mobile devices. You always want to have those be tappable. So then you can track the number of people who tap on telephone links and people who tap on mailto: links exactly the same way. Now something that I do have to say, though, is that if you are using a call tracking provider, like CallRail for example, which is one that we use, then youR17;re going to want to shut this off, because then you could end up in double counting. </p> <p>Particularly if you&#8217;re tracking every call made out from your website, then CallRail would have an Analytics integration, and then you would be tracking taps and you might also be tracking telephone clicks. So you can track it if you want to see how many people tap versus picking up the phone and calling the old-fashioned way with landlines. You can also do that, but that&#8217;s entirely up to you. But just keep that in mind if you are going to track telephone links. </p> Clicks <p>So the event is where you structure the category and then the action and the label.&nbsp;</p> <h4>External links

The way that we would structure external links, for example, we would say that the category for it is an external link, the action is click, and then the label is the actual link that was clicked for example. You can see you can go through each of these and see where this is happening. </p> <h4>Form submits</h4> <p>On telephone and mailto:, we might track the phone number.&nbsp;</p> <h4>PDFs <p>On other things, like PDFs, we might track like the page that this happened on.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Page scroll</h3> <p>For scroll tracking, for example, we would want to track the page that someone scrolled down on. What I recommend when you&#8217;re setting up the event tracking for page scroll, the category should be page scroll, the action should be the percentage of which people scroll down, and then the label should be the URL. </p> <p>Really think of it in terms of events, where you&#8217;ve got the category, which is what happened, the action, which is what did the person do, and the label is telling me more information about this. So actions are typically things like scroll, click, and tap if you&#8217;re going to be fancy and track mobile versus desktop. It could be things like form submit, for example, or just submit. Just really basic stuff. So really the two things that are going to tell you the difference are things like categories and labels, and the action is just the action that happened. </p>

I&#8217;m really pedantic when it comes to setting up events, but I think in the long term, again, future you is going to thank you if you set this stuff up properly from the beginning. So you can really see that the tag goes to this trigger. Tag to trigger, tag to trigger, etc. So really think about making sure that every one of your tags has a corresponding trigger if it makes sense. So now we&#8217;re going to leave you with some tips on how to set up your Tag Manager account. Tips <h3>1. Use a Google Analytics ID variable</h3>

So the first tip is use a Google Analytics ID variable. It&#8217;s one of the built-in variables. When you go into Tag Manager and you click on Variables, it&#8217;s one of the built-in variables in there. I really recommend using that, because if you hardcode in the GA ID and something happens and you have to change it in the future or you copy that for someone else or whatever it might be, you&#8217;re going to forget. </p> <p>I guarantee you you will forget. So you&#8217;re going to want to put that variable in there so you change it once and it&#8217;s everywhere. You&#8217;re saving yourself so much time and suffering. Just use a Google Analytics ID variable. If you have a really old container, maybe the variable wasn&#8217;t a thing when you first set it up. So one of the things I would recommend is go check and make sure you&#8217;re using a variable. If you&#8217;re not, then make a to-do for yourself to rip out all the hardcoded instances of your GA ID and instead replace it with a variable. </p> <p>It will save you so much headaches.&nbsp;</p> <h3>2. Create a default container to import

<p>So the next thing €” agencies, this is for you €” create a default container to import. Obviously, if you&#8217;re working in-house, you&#8217;re probably not making Google Tag Manager containers all that often, unless you work at say a homebuilder and youR17;re making microsites for every new home development. Then you might want to create a default container for yourself. But agency side for sure, you want have a default container that you make so every cool idea that you think of, you think, oh, we need to track this, just put it all in your default container, and then when you&#8217;re grabbing it to make one for a client, you can decide, oh, we don&#8217;t need this, or yes, we need this. </p> <p>It&#8217;s going to save you a ton of time when you&#8217;re setting up containers, because I find that thatR17;s the most labor-intensive part of working with a new Tag Manager container is thinking about, &#8220;What is all the stuff I want to include?&#8221; So you want to make sure that your default container has all your little tips and tricks that you&#8217;ve accumulated over the years in there and documented of course, and then decide on a client-by-client basis what you&#8217;re going to leave and what you217;re going to keep. </p> <h3>3. Use a naming scheme and folders</h3> <p>Also use a naming scheme and folders, again because you may not be working there forever, and somebody in the future is going to want to look at this and think, &#8220;Why did they set it up like this? What does this word mean? Why is this variable called foo?&#8221; You know, things that have annoyed me about developers for years and years and years, developers I love you, but please stop naming things foo. It makes no sense to anyone other than you. So our naming scheme, and you can totally steal this if you want, is we go product, result, and then what. </p> <p>So, for example, we would have our tag for Google Analytics page download. So it would say Google Analytics. This is the product that the thing is going to go to. Event is what is the result of this thing existing. Then what is the PDF download. Then it&#8217;s really clear, okay, I need to fix this thing with PDF download. Something is wrong. It&#8217;s kind of weird. Now I know exactly where to go. Again, with folders as well, so let&#8217;s say you&#8217;ve implemented something such as content consumption, which is a Google Tag Manager recipe that you can grab on our website at Kickpoint.ca, and I&#8217;ll make sure to link to it in the transcript. Let&#8217;s say you grab that. Then you&#8217;re going to want to take all the different tags and triggers that come along with content consumption and toss that into its own folder and then separate it out from all of your basic stuff. </p> <p>Even if you have everything to start in a folder called Basics or Events or Analytics versus Call Tracking versus any of the other billion different tracking pixels that you have on your website, it&#8217;s a good idea to just keep it all organized. I know it&#8217;s two minutes now. It is saving you a lifetime of suffering in the future, and the future you, whether it&#8217;s you working there or somebody who ends up taking your job five years from now, just make it easier on them. </p> <p>Especially too, when you think back to say Google Analytics has been around for a long time now. When I go back and look at some of my very, very first analytics that I set up, I might look at it and think, &#8220;Why was I doing that?221; But if you have documentation, at least you&#8217;re going to know why you did that really weird thing back in 2008. Or when you&#8217;re looking at this in 2029 and you&#8217;re thinking, &#8220;Why did I do this thing in 2019?&#8221; you&#8217;re going to have documentation for it. So just really keep that in mind.&nbsp; <p>Then the last thing is auditing regularly, and that means once every 3, 6, or 12 months. Pick a time period that makes sense for how often you&#8217;re going into the container. You go in and you take a look at every single tag, every single trigger, and every single variable. Simo Ahava has a really nice <a href="https://www.simoahava.com/tools/">Google Tag Manager sort of auditing tool.

I’ll make sure to link to that in the transcript as well. You can use that to just go through your container and see what’s up. Let’s say you tested out some sort of screen recording, like you installed Hotjar six months ago and you ended up deciding on say another product instead, like FullStory, so then you want to make sure you remove the Hotjar. How many times have you found that you look at a new website and you’re like, “Why is this on here?”

No one at the client can tell you. They’re like, “I don’t know where that code came from.” So this is where auditing can be really handy, because remember, over time, each one of those funny little pixels that you tested out some product and then you ended up not going with it is weighing down your page and maybe it’s just a couple of microseconds, but that stuff adds up. So you really do want to go in and audit regularly and remove anything you’re not using anymore. Keep your Google Tag Manager container clean.

A lot of this is focused on obviously making future you very happy. Auditing will also make future you very happy. So hopefully, out of this, you can create a Google Tag Manager default container that’s going to work for you. I’m going to make sure as well, when the transcript is out for this, that I’m going to include some of the links that I talked about as well as a link to some more tips on how to add in things like conversion linker and make sure I’m updating it for when this video is published.

Thanks so much.

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Optimize Your Posts before Publishing

Posted by on Jun 18, 2019 in Greg's SEO Articles | Comments Off on Optimize Your Posts before Publishing

Optimizing for SEO is a process of improvement/s, especially when it comes to your webpage or blog content. Here’s a list of recommendations on how to do that.

USE THE BEST TITLE FOR YOUR ARTICLE

You don’t want to write something with a title that’s boring or too long, so make one that’s instantly catchy but is also 50-60 characters long.

It’s easier than you think! If you search “Title Creator” or “Title Generator” you’ll be able to make plenty of good headlines for your post.

USE THE BEST PERFORMING KEYWORDS

This is easy to do as well! Simply go to Google’s very own Keword Planner Tool and find a keyword that’s not too short but not too long, and has plenty of search volume. After that, make sure to place those specific keywords in the title, the post’s URL, and the article body in the first 100 words or first paragraph.

MAKE SURE TO USE H1 TAGS FOR YOUR TITLE

H1 is the tag Google’s search engine looks for when forming its search results, so make sure your title has it! You really only want to use H2 and H3 for distinction within your article.

BUILD METADATA FOR ANY IMAGES / VIDEOS IN THE ARTICLE

Metadata explains an image or video to Google’s web crawlers. This info (in the case of an image) is the title, alt text and its caption. Metadata can also help site visitors should an image fail to load. WordPress is able to add all this in the Media Library.

MAKE IMAGE SMALLER TO MAKE IT LOAD FASTER

This can’t be stressed enough: make sure your post loads fast for viewers, and the best way to do that is to size your images properly.

MAKE CONTENT ENGAGING

Just like your title your content needs to be engaging as well. One way is to add links in your content.

MAKE PARAGRAPHS SHORT/SHORTER

Google and SEO experts say that shorter paragraphs are easier for Google to crawl for. It also makes reading easier too, because most readers scan the article before reading it. Make sure complex sentences are simpler to read (by using Grammarly, Ginger and HemingwayApp) but also highlight key points in your article.

MAKE SOCIAL BUTTONS EASY TO SEE AND USE

Social media are huge traffic sources to share content, so make sure such buttons are visible (nearest the top as possible) so users can share your posts. A plugin can do this automatically for you!

USE SEO PLUGINS

Yoast is a perfect example! It helps you form SEO-friendly titles and descriptions (metadata as well), recommends where to place your target keyword, and provides tips as you write.

How to build a structured data-powered FAQ page using Yoast SEO

Posted by on Jun 15, 2019 in SEO Articles | Comments Off on How to build a structured data-powered FAQ page using Yoast SEO

Many, many sites have an FAQ page. This is a page where a lot of frequently asked questions get the appropriate answer. It is often a single page filled to the brim with questions and answers. While it’s easy to add one, it’s good to keep in mind that not all sites need an FAQ. Most of the times all you need is good content targeted at the users’ needs. Here, I’ll discuss the use of FAQ pages and show you how to make one yourself with Yoast SEOs new structured data content blocks for the WordPress block editor. You won’t believe how easy it is.

For more information on our Schema structured data implementation, please read our Schema documentation.

What is an FAQ?

FAQ stands for frequently asked questions. It is a single page collecting a series of question and its answers on a specific subject, product or company. An FAQ is often seen as a tool to reduce the workload of the customer support team. It is also used to show that you are aware of the issues a customer might have and to provide an answer to that.

But first: Do you really, really, really need an FAQ?

Usually, if you need to answer a lot of questions from users in an FAQ, that means that your content is not providing these answers and that you should work on that. Or maybe it is your product or service itself that’s not clear enough? One of the main criticisms of FAQs is that they hardly ever answer the questions consumers really have. They are also lazy: instead of figuring out how to truly answer a question with formidable content — using content design, for instance –, people rather throw some random stuff on a page and call it an FAQ.

That’s not to say you should never use an FAQ. Numerous sites successfully apply them — even we use them sparingly. In some cases, they do provide value. Users understand how an FAQ works and are quick to find what they are looking for — if the makers of the page know what they are doing. So don’t make endless lists of loosely related ‘How can I…’ or ‘How to…’ questions, because people will struggle to filter out what they need.

It has to be a page that’s easy to digest and has to have real answers to real questions by users. You can find scores of these if you search for them: ask your support team for instance! Collect and analyze the issues that come up frequently to see if you’re not missing some pain points in your products or if your content is targeting the wrong questions.

So don’t hide answers to pressings questions away on an FAQ page if you want to answer these in-depth: make an article out of it. This is what SEO deals with: provide an answer that matches your content to the search intent.

Questions and answers spoken out loud?

Google is trying to match a question from a searcher to an answer from a source. If you mark up your questions and answers with FAQ structured data, you tell search engines that this little sentence is a question and that this paragraph is its answer. And all these questions and answers are related to the main topic of the page.

Paragraph-based content is all the rage. One of the reasons? The advent of voice search. Google is looking for easy to understand, block-based content that it can use to answer searchers questions right in the search engine — or by speaking it out loud. Using the Schema property speakable might even speed up this content discovery by determining which part of the content is fit for text-to-speech conversion.

How to build an FAQ page in WordPress via Yoast SEO content blocks

The best way to set up a findable, readable and understandable FAQ page on a WordPress site is by using the structured data content blocks in Yoast SEO. These blocks for the new block editor — formally known as Gutenberg –, make building an FAQ page a piece of cake.

All the generated structured data for the FAQ will be added to the graph Yoast SEO generates for every page. This makes it even easier for search engines to understand your content. Yoast SEO automatically adds the necessary structured data so search engines like Google can do cool stuff with it. But, if nothing else, it might even give you an edge over your competitor. So, let’s get to it!

  1. Open WordPress’ new block editor

    Make a page in WordPress, add a title and an introductory paragraph. Now add the FAQ structured data content block. You can find the Yoast SEO structured data content blocks inside the Add Block modal. Scroll all the way down to find them or type ‘FAQ’ in the search bar, which I’ve highlighted in the screenshot below.yoast seo structured data content blocks FAQ

  2. Add questions and answers

    After you’ve added the FAQ block, you can start to add questions and answers to it. Keep in mind that these questions live inside the FAQ block. It’s advisable to keep the content related to each other so you can keep the page clean and focused. So no throwing in random questions.yoast seo structured data content blocks faq add question

  3. Keep filling, check and publish

    After adding the first question and answering it well, keep adding the rest of your questions and answers until you’ve filled your FAQ page. In the screenshot below you see two questions filled in. I’ve highlighted two buttons, the Add Image button and the Add Question. These speak for themselves.

    Once you are done, you’ll have a well-structured FAQ page with valid structured data. Go to the front-end of your site and check if everything is in order. If not, make the necessary changes.

What does an FAQ rich result look like?

We have an FAQ page for our Yoast Diversity Fund and that page was awarded an FAQ rich result by Google after we added an FAQ structured data content block. So, wondering what an FAQ looks like in Google? Wonder no more:

An example FAQ rich result for a Yoast page

Keep in mind that an FAQ rich result like this might influence the CTR to that page. It might even lead to a decrease in traffic to your site since you are giving away answers instantly. It is a good idea, therefore, to use it only for information that you don’t mind giving away like this. Or you have to find a way to make people click to your site. Do experiment with it, of course, to see the effects. Maybe it works brilliantly for you, who knows?

What does this look like under the hood?

Run your new FAQ page through Structured Data Testing Tool to see what it looks like for Google. Yoast SEO automatically generates valid structured data for your FAQ page. Here’s a piece of the Yoast Diversity Fund page, showing one particular question and its answer:

The first question and answer from the structured data graph

It’s basically built up like this. The context surrounding the questions is an FAQPage Schema graph. Every question gets a Question type and an acceptedAnswer with an answer type. That sounds hard, but it’s not. All you have to do is fill in the Question and the Answer and you’re good to go!

This translates to the code below as generated automatically by the Yoast SEO structured data content blocks. Now, Google will immediately see that this piece of content contains a question with an accepted answer. It will also see how this FAQ fits in with the rest of the page and the entities within your site. If you’re lucky, this might eventually lead to a featured snippet or another type of rich result.

<script type='application/ld+json' class='yoast-schema-graph yoast-schema-graph--main'> {
    "@context":"https://schema.org",
    "@graph":[ {
        "@type": "Organization", "@id": "https://yoast.com/#organization", "name": "Yoast", "url": "https://yoast.com/", "sameAs": ["https://www.facebook.com/yoast", "https://www.instagram.com/yoast/", "https://www.linkedin.com/company/1414157/", "https://www.youtube.com/yoast", "https://www.pinterest.com/yoast/", "https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoast", "https://twitter.com/yoast"]
    }
    ,
    {
        "@type":"WebSite",
        "@id":"https://yoast.com/#website",
        "url":"https://yoast.com/",
        "name":"Yoast",
        "publisher": {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/#organization"
        }
        ,
        "potentialAction": {
            "@type":"SearchAction",
            "target":"https://yoast.com/?s={search_term_string}",
            "query-input": "required name=search_term_string"
        }
    }
    ,
    {
        "@type": ["WebPage", "FAQPage"], "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#webpage", "url": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/", "inLanguage": "en-US", "name": "How to Apply for the Yoast Diversity Fund • Yoast", "isPartOf": {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/#website"
        }
        ,
        "image": {
            "@type": "ImageObject", "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#primaryimage", "url": "https://yoast.com/app/uploads/2018/03/Yoast_diversity_fund_FI__1_-1.jpg", "width": 1200, "height": 628
        }
        ,
        "primaryImageOfPage": {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#primaryimage"
        }
        ,
        "datePublished":"2019-05-03T11:12:29+00:00",
        "dateModified":"2019-06-07T09:51:36+00:00",
        "breadcrumb": {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#breadcrumb"
        }
    }
    ,
    {
        "@type":"BreadcrumbList",
        "@id":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#breadcrumb",
        "itemListElement":[ {
            "@type":"ListItem",
            "position":1,
            "item": {
                "@type": "WebPage", "@id": "https://yoast.com/", "url": "https://yoast.com/", "name": "Home"
            }
        }
        ,
        {
            "@type":"ListItem",
            "position":2,
            "item": {
                "@type": "WebPage", "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/", "url": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/", "name": "Yoast Diversity Fund"
            }
        }
        ,
        {
            "@type":"ListItem",
            "position":3,
            "item": {
                "@type": "WebPage", "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/", "url": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/", "name": "How to Apply for the Yoast Diversity Fund"
            }
        }
        ]
    }
    ,
    [ {
        "@type":"ItemList",
        "mainEntityOfPage": {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#webpage"
        }
        ,
        "numberOfItems":5,
        "itemListElement":[ {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800785311"
        }
        ,
        {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800831879"
        }
        ,
        {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800847830"
        }
        ,
        {
            "@id": "https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800862202"
        }
        ]
    }
    ],
    {
        "@type":"Question",
        "@id":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800785311",
        "position":0,
        "url":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800785311",
        "name":"What type of costs are reimbursed?",
        "answerCount":1,
        "acceptedAnswer": {
            "@type": "Answer", "text": "Our goal is to reimburse those costs that would keep you from speaking at tech conferences. If you, for whatever reason, have costs, such as child-care or specialized transport, for example, we invite you to share those with us and we'll look at those on a per-case scenario. Examples of costs we're happy to reimburse are:u2013 Travel and transportation, e.g. gas, car rental, taxis or flights.u2013 Accommodation, hotel, AirBNB or similar. u2013 Child-care costs.u2013 Sign language interpreter.u2013 Visa costs."
        }
    }
    ,
    {
        "@type":"Question",
        "@id":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800831879",
        "position":1,
        "url":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800831879",
        "name":"How many times can I apply for the Yoast Diversity Fund?",
        "answerCount":1,
        "acceptedAnswer": {
            "@type": "Answer", "text": "Our goal is to assist in increasing speaker diversity as much as possible. This means we'll focus on first-time applications mostly. However, there is no limit to the number of times you can apply."
        }
    }
    ,
    {
        "@type":"Question",
        "@id":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800847830",
        "position":2,
        "url":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800847830",
        "name":"Is the fund available to all?",
        "answerCount":1,
        "acceptedAnswer": {
            "@type": "Answer", "text": "Yes. With the exception of Yoast employees, former Yoast employees, and contractors."
        }
    }
    ,
    {
        "@type":"Question",
        "@id":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800862202",
        "position":3,
        "url":"https://yoast.com/yoast-diversity-fund/apply/#faq-question-1556800862202",
        "name":"When should I apply?",
        "answerCount":1,
        "acceptedAnswer": {
            "@type": "Answer", "text": "Applicants should apply at least one month before the event."
        }
    }
    ]
}

</script>

Structured data is so cool

Structured data is hot. It is one of the foundations on which the web is built today and its importance will only increase with time. In this post, I’ve shown you one of the newest Schema additions, and you’ll increasingly see this pop up in the search results.

For more information on our Schema structured data implementation, please read our Schema documentation.

The post How to build a structured data-powered FAQ page using Yoast SEO appeared first on Yoast.

Build your PPC campaigns with this mini campaign builder script for Google Ads

Posted by on Jun 14, 2019 in SEO Articles | Comments Off on Build your PPC campaigns with this mini campaign builder script for Google Ads

Need to quickly build a campaign or add keywords to an existing one? This script will do the work for you!

All you need to do is input a few keywords and headlines in a spreadsheet and BAM! You’ve got yourself the beginnings of a great campaign.

I’m a firm believer in Single Keyword per Ad Group (SKAG) structure – it increases ad/keyword relevance and therefore improves quality score, makes CPCs cheaper, gets you a higher ad rank and a better CTR.

Sadly, building out SKAG structures is a pretty time-consuming endeavor. You can’t implement millions of keywords and ads without PPC tech powering your builds.

But if a client just needs a couple of new keywords after updating their site with new content, this script is a quick and easy solution.

And that’s exactly what I love about PPC. There’s a special place in my heart for simple scripts anyone can use to achieve tasks that are otherwise repetitive or near-impossible.

What does the script do?

This tool will save a lot of time with small-scale builds where you know exactly which keywords and ad copy you need, for example when you’re adding a few keywords to an existing campaign.

You input your campaign name, keywords, headlines, descriptions, paths and final URL, and it will output three tabs for you: one with keyword combinations, one with negatives, and ads to upload to Google Ads Editor.

It creates one exact and one broad match modifier campaign and creates a list of keywords as exact negatives in the broad campaign to make sure that search terms that match exactly will go through the exact keyword.

I’m sure you’re dying to give it a whirl, so let’s get cracking!

How do you use it?

Make a copy of this spreadsheet (note: you’ll need to authorize the script to run). You’ll find all the instructions there as a future reminder.

Once you’ve got the spreadsheet ready, input the following:

  • The campaign name
  • The campaign name delimiter to distinguish between broad and exact campaigns
  • Headline 1 (if this cell is not specified, then it will be the same as the keyword)
  • Headline 2
  • Optionally, headline 3
  • Description 1
  • Optionally, description 2
  • Optionally, path 1 and path 2
  • The final URL
  • The keywords (you can keep going outside of the box with these!)

You’ll see a handy character counter which will go red if you exceed the character limit. Bear in mind that this tool will assume that you’re using it correctly and so you’ll need to make sure that you’re staying within the limit!

You can also optionally create a second ad variant by choosing the part of your text you want to vary (e.g., headline 2 or description 2) and inputting the copy. Otherwise, just select “None” from the dropdown menu.

Once you’re done, click the gigantic “Go!” Button, and wait for the magic to happen.

It will generate three tabs labelled “Keywords,” “Negatives” and “Ads.” If you want to run the script again with different keywords, make sure you save these tabs elsewhere or rename them to prevent the script from overriding them.

Finally, you can paste these tabs into Editor and update all the relevant settings and adjustments. Job done!

DOWNLOAD: You’ll need to authorize the script to run after you make a copy of this spreadsheet.

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