SEO Articles

Content Audit Template

See the template

Say a SaaS company hires you as a content marketer. They’re in the People Operations space, and your mandate is to kickstart their thought leadership program. Your employer has plenty of smart people designing software, and many of them have already written articles in their area of expertise. Some of them have even created microsites—on team building, compensation practices, inclusion, and more. However, you notice that the tone and design of these microsites don’t quite seem to match your brand message.

Your teammates’ expertise makes a thought leadership program possible, but what do you do with the materials they’ve created? What do you do with the materials they’ve created so far? How do you wrangle your existing content, and reconcile it with the content you want to create for this thought leadership platform? 

One approach is to begin with a content audit. When it’s essential to understand and align your content to achieve your content strategy, an inventory and evaluation of existing content will give you the information you need to define a way forward and make recommendations on how to proceed.

What is a content audit?

A content audit is an inventory of content assets that evaluates the quality of that content or measures its effectiveness.

Depending on your goals, a content audit may also include producing additional recommendations or a long-lived index of content.

Using this content audit template

We’re providing a content audit template that we use as a baseline with our clients. Take a look at it to familiarize yourself. However, a content audit can’t rely on pre-baked metrics. Unlike Distilled’s technical audit, there is some preparation work you must do before starting the execute this audit. There are two reasons for that:

  1. Qualitative measures of content quality will differ. These are gradings of the design or flow or branding of content. What’s right for one brand won’t be right for another.
  2. Quantitative measures of content outcomes will also vary. How many people have read this content? How many people engaged with a micro-conversion on this page? Choose the numbers that speak to your goals.

The idea is that the structure of this sheet is a useful outline for whatever measures you wish to use. To get the most out of it, though, you’ll need to develop custom grading criteria.

How to perform a content audit

Decide what you want to know

What do you need to know to take the next step with your content? That’s the stuff you want to record. Our template comes with a representative set of qualitative and quantitative dimensions to inspire you. Here’s our rationale for including each of the categories in our content audit template:

  1. Organization. That means individual ids for each page, as well as sections and subsections. It allows us to reference specific pages and understand at a glance how we distribute our content.
  2. Ownership. Who is responsible for this content? When was it last refreshed? How often should you look at it?
  3. Conversion. What audience is this intended for? What do we want those folks to do? Specific default criteria are in the Grading: Funnel sheet.
  4. Writing. This section evaluates the quality of writing on each page. We score several facets, and these roll up to the high-level score in the first column of the group. The criteria we use are in the Grading: Writing sheet. For more details, see the next section.
  5. Design. This is the same as the writing section, but for design and layout elements. If you replace the words with lorem ipsum, would the page still reflect the brand you want to project? The default rubric is in the Grading: Design sheet.
  6. Other quantitative details. In our template, we include measurements like page views during a certain period and the number of incoming links from different domains. Include any metrics that your business uses to measure success.

Revise your evaluation criteria

Some of the data you’re gathering is objective: how many times was this page viewed in the last 30 days? Other observations are subjective. Does the copy match your brand? Does the design? You probably need to record a judgment about these.

It can be paralyzing to evaluate the quality of a document with a single number. With an open-ended question like, “how good is the writing on this page?” we’ve seen analysts take twenty to thirty minutes or more.

Instead, we break our evaluation into pieces so small that grading is trivial. The questions are so simple that it takes only a moment to evaluate them. There is little discretion in giving any specific score, and the 0-4 grading system is reassuringly coarse.

The upshot of all this is consistent scoring, less stress, and a lot of time saved.

Choose what content to include.

The choice of content will depend on your goal. At Distilled, we’re supporting our clients’ digital marketing. So we usually look at what you could think of as their “marketing site”.

If you invest in evergreen content, you might want to include all of it. If you’re a publisher, and your content is ephemeral, you’ll have to make a judgment call on what is helpful to include.

Ultimately, if you have fewer than a thousand pages, you probably have time to look at all of them.

Evaluate your content

Now that you’ve drafted your grading criteria and know the pages you want to evaluate, it’s time to look at your content. Ideally, you’ll spend two to five minutes per page. If your evaluation criteria are granular enough, you’ll be able to delegate work to your team with confidence. Have at it!

Tips for your content audit

Don’t hide pages that need love

A page with perfect structure, tone-of-voice, and grammar is useless if it’s peppered with spelling errors. The formulas for the top-level scores in the Writing and Design sections of the audit take this into account.

Put into simple English, the formulas mean, “The score is the average of all the other scores unless the page failed on some measure. If it did, the lowest score it got becomes the score for the page.” That guarantees that no page can appear to be outstanding if it has an apparent flaw.

Keep evaluation criteria dead simple

No matter how well you plan, performing an initial content audit is a drag. Even at two to five minutes per page, you’re still likely to spend hours on it. Make your life easier by keeping the evaluation criteria as simple as possible. Paradoxically, the less time you spend thinking about the pages, the more useful your grading will be.

Less is more

Particularly with the quantitative data sections, it can be tempting to add more and more data. The internet makes an immense amount of information available to us. Surely more data will mean better decisions? Not really!

What kind of decisions will you need to make about your content? What data will help you make those decisions? If you accomplish what you want to, which of these numbers do you anticipate changing? Those are probably the only ones you need to measure.

See the template

Sarah Howe and I created the first version of this template in collaboration.

Further reading

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Spectator to Partner: Turn Your Clients into SEO Allies – Best of Whiteboard Friday

Posted by KameronJenkins

Are your clients your allies in SEO, or are they passive spectators? Could they even be inadvertently working against you? A better understanding of expectations, goals, and strategy by everyone involved can improve your client relations, provide extra clarity, and reduce the number of times you’re asked to “just SEO a site.” 

In today’s Whiteboard Friday, Kameron Jenkins outlines tactics you should know for getting clients and bosses excited about the SEO journey, as well as the risks involved in passivity.

(We were inspired to revisit this classic Whiteboard Friday by our brand-new Mini Guide to SEO Reporting! These two resources go together like a fine La Croix and a well-aged cheese.)

Hop to the Mini Guide

Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

Video Transcription

Hey, everyone, and welcome to this week’s edition of Whiteboard Friday. I am Kameron Jenkins, and I’m the SEO Wordsmith here at Moz. Today I’m going to be talking with you about how to turn your clients from spectators, passive spectators to someone who is proactively interested and an ally in your SEO journey.

So if you’ve ever heard someone come to you, maybe it’s a client or maybe you’re in-house and this is your boss saying this, and they say, “Just SEO my site,” then this is definitely for you. A lot of times it can be really hard as an SEO to work on a site if you really aren’t familiar with the business, what that client is doing, what they’re all about, what their goals are. So I’m going to share with you some tactics for getting your clients and your boss excited about SEO and excited about the work that you’re doing and some risks that can happen when you don’t do that.

Tactics

So let’s dive right in. All right, first we’re going to talk about tactics.

1. Share news

The first tactic is to share news. In the SEO industry, things are changing all the time, so it’s actually a really great tactic to keep yourself informed, but also to share that news with the client. So here’s an example. Google My Business is now experimenting with a new video format for their post feature. So one thing that you can do is say, “Hey, client, I hear that Google is experimenting with this new format. They’re using videos now. Would you like to try it?”

So that’s really cool because it shows them that you’re on top of things. It shows them that you’re the expert and you’re keeping your finger on the pulse of the industry. It also tells them that they’re going to be a part of this new, cutting-edge technology, and that can get them really, really excited about the SEO work you’re doing. So make sure to share news. I think that can be really, really valuable.

2. Outline your work

The next tip is to outline your work. This one seems really simple, but there is so much to say for telling a client what you’re going to do, doing it, and then telling them that you did it. It’s amazing what can happen when you just communicate with a client more. There have been plenty of situations where maybe I did less tangible work for a client one week, but because I talk to them more, they were more inclined to be happy with me and excited about the work I was doing.

It’s also cool because when you tell a client ahead of time what you’re going to do, it gives them time to get excited about, “Ooh, I can’t wait to see what he or she is going to do next.” So that’s a really good tip for getting your clients excited about SEO.

3. Report results

Another thing is to report on your results. So, as SEOs, it can be really easy to say, hey, I added this page or I fixed these things or I updated this.

But if we detach it from the actual results, it doesn’t really matter how much a client likes you or how much your boss likes you, there’s always a risk that they could pull the plug on SEO because they just don’t see the value that’s coming from it. So that’s an unfortunate reality, but there are tons of ways that you can show the value of SEO. One example is, “Hey, client, remember that page that we identified that was ranking on page two. We improved it. We made all of those updates we talked about, and now it’s ranking on page one. So that’s really exciting. We’re seeing a lot of new traffic come from it.I’m wondering, are you seeing new calls, new leads, an uptick in any of those things as a result of that?”

So that’s really good because it shows them what you did, the results from that, and then it kind of connects it to, “Hey, are you seeing any revenue, are you seeing new clients, new customers,” things like that. So they’re more inclined to see that what you’re doing is making a real, tangible impact on actual revenue and their actual business goals.

4. Acknowledge and guide their ideas

This one is really, really important. It can be hard sometimes to marry best practices and customer service. So what I mean by that is there’s one end of the pendulum where you are really focused on best practices. This is right. This is wrong. I know my SEO stuff. So when a client comes to you and they say, “Hey, can we try this?” and you go, “No, that’s not best practices,”it can kind of shut them down. It doesn’t get them involved in the SEO process. In fact, it just kind of makes them recoil and maybe they don’t want to talk to you, and that’s the exact opposite of what we want here. On the other end of that spectrum though, you have clients who say, “Hey, I really want to try this.I saw this article. I’m interested in this thing. Can you do it for my website?”

Maybe it’s not the greatest idea SEO-wise. You’re the SEO expert, and you see that and you go, “Mm, that’s actually kind of scary. I don’t think I want to do that.” But because you’re so focused on pleasing your client, you maybe do it anyway. So that’s the opposite of what we want as well. We want to have a “no, but” mentality. So an example of that could be your client emails in and says, “Hey, I want to try this new thing.”

You go, “Hey, I really like where your head is at. I like that you’re thinking about things this way. I’m so glad you shared this with me. I tried this related thing before, and I think that would be actually a really good idea to employ on your website.” So kind of shifting the conversation, but still bringing them along with you for that journey and guiding them to the correct conclusions. So that’s another way to get them invested without shying them away from the SEO process.

Risks

So now that we’ve talked about those tactics, we’re going to move on to the risks. These are things that could happen if you don’t get your clients excited and invested in the SEO journey.

1. SEO becomes a checklist

When you don’t know your client well enough to know what they’re doing in the real world, what they’re all about, the risk becomes you have to kind of just do site health stuff, so fiddling with meta tags, maybe you’re changing some paragraphs around, maybe you’re changing H1s, fixing 404s, things like that, things that are just objectively, “I can make this change, and I know it’s good for site health.”

But it’s not proactive. It’s not actually doing any SEO strategies. It’s just cleanup work. If you just focus on cleanup work, that’s really not an SEO strategy. That’s just making sure your site isn’t broken. As we all know, you need so much more than that to make sure that your client’s site is ranking. So that’s a risk.

If you don’t know your clients, if they’re not talking to you, or they’re not excited about SEO, then really all you’re left to do is fiddle with kind of technical stuff. As good as that can be to do, our jobs are way more fun than that. So communicate with your clients. Get them on board so that you can do proactive stuff and not just fiddling with little stuff.

2. SEO conflicts with business goals

So another risk is that SEO can conflict with business goals.

So say that you’re an SEO. Your client is not talking to you. They’re not really excited about stuff that you’re doing. But you decide to move forward with proactive strategies anyway. So say I’m an SEO, and I identify this keyword. My client has this keyword. This is a related keyword. It can bring in a lot of good traffic. I’ve identified this good opportunity. All of the pages that are ranking on page one, they’re not even that good. I could totally do better. So I’m going to proactively go, I’m going to build this page of content and put it on my client’s site. Then what happens when they see that page of content and they go, “We don’t even do that. We don’t offer that product. We don’t offer that service.”

Oops. So that’s really bad. What can happen is that, yes, you’re being proactive, and that’s great. But if you don’t actually know what your client is doing, because they’re not communicating with you, they’re not really excited, you risk misaligning with their business goals and misrepresenting them. So that’s a definite risk.

3. You miss out on PR opportunities

Another thing, you miss out on PR opportunities. So again, if your client is not talking to you, they’re not excited enough to share what they’re doing in the real world with you, you miss out on news like, “Hey, we’re sponsoring this event,”or, “Hey, I was the featured expert on last night’s news.”

Those are all really, really good things that SEOs look for. We crave that information. We can totally use that to capitalize on it for SEO value. If we’re not getting that from our clients, then we miss out on all those really, really cool PR opportunities. So a definite risk. We want those PR opportunities. We want to be able to use them.

4. Client controls the conversation

Next up, client controls the conversation. That’s a definite risk that can happen. So if a client is not talking to you, a reason could be they don’t really trust you yet. When they don’t trust you, they tend to start to dictate. So maybe our client emails in.

A good example of this is, “Hey, add these 10 backlinks to my website.” Or, “Hey, I need these five pages, and I need them now.” Maybe they’re not even actually bad suggestions. It’s just the fact that the client is asking you to do that. So this is kind of tricky, because you want to communicate with your client. It’s good that they’re emailing in, but they’re the ones at that point that are dictating the strategy. Whereas they should be communicating their vision, so hey, as a business owner, as a website owner, “This is my vision. This is my goal, and this is what I want.”

As the SEO professional, you’re receiving that information and taking it and making it into an SEO strategy that can actually be really, really beneficial for the client. So there’s a huge difference between just being a task monkey and kind of transforming their vision into an SEO strategy that can really, really work for them. So that’s a definite risk that can happen.

Excitement + partnership = better SEO campaigns

There’s a lot of different things that can happen. These are just some examples of tactics that you can use and risks. If you have any examples of things that have worked for you in the past, I would love to hear about them. It’s really good to information share. Success stories where maybe you got your client or your boss really bought into SEO, more so than just, “Hey, I’m spending money on it.”

But, “Hey, I’m your partner in this. I’m your ally, and I’m going to give you all the information because I know that it’s going to be mutually beneficial for us.” So at the end here, excitement, partner, better SEO campaigns. This is going to be I believe a recipe for success to get your clients and your boss on board. Thanks again so much for watching this edition of Whiteboard Friday, and come back next week for another one.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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How To Pick a WordPress Theme

Once you’ve finished creating your website, choosing a theme will be the next task on your checklist. Thousands of them exist on the market today. This can make finding the correct one a daunting task. Luckily for you, I’ve created a simple guide that is going to break down the process into a simple, step-by-step process.

First things first, what type of website did you create? Is it a simple blog, company page, online shop, app portfolio, or something not listed here? You always want to choose a theme that’s related to your niche.

For example, a blog about cats can get away with a basic theme. The blog will not need any fancy sliders or extra functionality.

Another example includes Apple.com. This website includes sliders, sales pages, videos, credit card forms, and artistic images. Obviously, you will not need a website with all of these features unless you have several products to sell. Try to keep it as simple as possible.


What Works Best, a Free or Premium Theme?

For most beginner sites (see the cat blog example above), a free theme will suffice. You can find hundreds of them in the WordPress Theme Directory. All themes in the directory are quality controlled by WordPress. This will ensure that they contain no malware and make the use of proper development techniques.

Please exercise caution with free themes outside of the WordPress directory as some contain malware and other issues. Most free themes will be an excellent choice for your website. Just make they stay updated and include some level of support behind them. Sites without frequent updates and support will make your site vulnerable to malware.

If you want to take your site to the next level, you’ll need to spend a little extra money on a premium theme. What separates premium themes from free themes? Firstly, most free themes will force you to give a backlink in the footer. This removes an element of professionalism from your website. Secondly, the chances are that someone else will be using the same theme which will prevent your site from standing out. These are not big issues, but they will be something to think about once you start gaining more traffic.

The primary benefits of premium themes are better support, more customization options, faster updates, and visually appealing designs. Almost everything in a theme’s framework is improved when you upgrade to premium offerings.

Basically, it is up to you to determine which option suits you and your website best. My rule of thumb is to stick with basic themes and upgrade to more complex themes in the future if your site requires it.


Why Responsive Design is a Must

What is a responsive design? Responsive design optimizes your website’s layout for the smaller displays of mobile devices. Responsive designs remove the need to zoom, scroll left and right, and press small links. Responsive design is a requirement if you want your website to be accessible by all people on the internet.

Since mobile users now represent a large amount of traffic, you could be losing a sizable readership if your theme is not responsive. Most themes are responsive by default nowadays, but a few are still behind the times. You’ll be able to tell if they are responsive usually in their description.

Wondering if your current theme is responsive? If so, you can perform a Google search for “mobile theme test” and find a website that’ll test your theme on multiple screen resolutions.
How To Pick a WordPress Theme

Google and other search engines are now identifying which websites are mobile and which ones are not. You can find out if a site is mobile-friendly by searching for the website on a mobile device.

Will a mobile optimized website help me rank better in Google? As always, figuring out Google’s algorithms is not an exact science. It is hard to determine if this will increase your rankings on mobile devices. Nonetheless, I do believe that people will be more likely to click on mobile-friendly search results over results that don’t make the use of responsive design.


What about Support?

Having a support team behind you is a must. Issues occasionally arise in themes that cannot be fixed unless you have experienced in web design. There’s nothing more frustrating than dealing with a broken theme. Going back to the free vs. premium debate, support is usually going to be faster and more reliable on the premium end. Groups that provide support within 24 hours or less are preferred. Anything longer will keep you “stuck” trying to fix issues.


Are Memberships Worth It?

Memberships give you unlimited access to all their themes (and sometimes plugins). While it may sound like a great offer, why would you need unlimited themes for just one website? I recommend choosing one theme and using it until the design gets stale or extra functionality is required. Unless your theme is completely unusable or outdated, your web users will not put too much value in your theme design. Ultimately, it will be the content that counts. Changing your theme too often will result in wasted time that could have been spent making content.

For instance, you could design the prettiest website in the world and still get no traffic without content. On the contrary, you could have a very basic theme and still receive high amounts of traffic as long as your content is interesting. The key point here is not to get caught in having the latest and greatest design. Websites that puts an emphasis your content will do just fine.

Now don’t get me wrong, memberships can be a great thing, especially if you own multiple sites and would like to use different themes on them. Just don’t get caught up in paying for expensive monthly or yearly memberships that you probably don’t need.


Too Many Functions?

Don’t worry about buying a theme with “100s of features” unless you actually need them. Many developers are guilty of stuffing their themes with features that the average user will not need. There’s nothing worse than buying a highly complex theme for your simple blog and not knowing how to use it. Not only that, these themes tend to be poorly optimized and can bring your site to a crawl when it receives high loads of traffic. It is best to stay away from these themes unless you absolutely need their features.


Use Caution With Big Directories

I recommend using caution with big directories like ThemeForest, Mojo Themes, and others. Since almost anyone can add themes to most directories, quality control is somewhat of an issue. I’ve used many themes from ThemeForest that are full of issues due to the feature “stuffing” I mentioned above.


Page Speed

Optimizing your website for page speed is very important. Have you ever clicked on a webpage only to wait 5 seconds for it to load and then decide to press back? Preferably, you are going to want a theme that loads in less than 5 seconds. People’s attention spans are short, and you’ll want to ensure that you capture it before they get bored and leave your site.

Testing a site’s page speed and optimization is easy. You can head over to GTmetrix and type in a link to a theme’s demo. I ran a test on WealthyAffiliate.com (an excellent source for affiliate marketing) and received performance scores around 85% on average. Anything above 80% is considered good; anything above 90% is considered excellent. The page loaded in around 2.5 seconds. This is fast and achieves the modern standard.

How To Pick a WordPress Theme


What Do the Reviews Say?

This is an important question to ask when deciding if a theme is worth purchasing. Don’t just read the 5-star ratings. Take notes from the lower ratings as well. Do not waste your hard-earned cash on broken themes.


SEO (Search Engine Optimization)

This is not a big deal when it comes to choosing a theme. Search engine optimization takes care of simple formatting for your site in search engine results. Even if the theme is not entirely optimized, you can find plenty of plugins that’ll optimize your website for search engines. You do not need to find the perfect theme for SEO as long as the basics are included.


Is It Worth the Price?

Most premium themes will run around $45-70. I do not recommend spending over $100 unless the theme has extra functionality that cannot be found elsewhere.


Some Tips and Tricks

Add WordPress Tags to Your WordPress Theme

A couple of weeks ago the WordPress community was blessed with the latest release from the WordPress team, now known as WordPress. One of the included features was an extremely important and extremely useful one, which adds built-in tags to WordPress.

If you have already upgraded to WordPress and want to take advantage of this new feature, you will probably have to manually add this tagging feature to your theme. In order to add tags, you simply need to paste the following code where you want to display the tags:

<?php the_tags(); ?>

This will actually add the text “Tags:” before the output of tags, so you will not need to do this manually. If you would like to proudly display your tags in a cloud somewhere (most commonly in your sidebar), you can easily do so by using the following code:

<?php wp_tag_cloud(‘smallest=8&largest=36&’); ?>

This code tells WordPress to display your tags in alphabetical order with the smallest text being 8-point font and the largest font is 36-point font. You can adjust the font sizes to your preference.

If you would prefer to stick with the Ultimate Tagging Warrior plugin, the author has stated that the plugin will be updated to work with WordPress. Most people, though, would probably prefer to switch to the new built-in tagging system. If you’d like to make the switch from UTW to the new WordPress tagging system, WordPress has made it easy to make the conversion with their import feature. You can find the import option under the Manage tab in your Dashboard. In addition to the ability to import your UTW tags, WordPress also allows you to import tags from other plugins such as Bunny’s Technorati Tags and the Simple Tagging plugin.


Creating a Two-Tiered Navigation Menu

If you’ve been following the recent trends with premium WordPress themes, you’ve probably noticed that the two-tiered navigation menu has become extremely popular. An example of this is the popular Revolution WordPress themes. This style of menu can be used in a variety of ways, but the most common seems to be to display your children pages in a menu below your blog’s parent pages.

If you’ve wondered how to hack your existing WordPress theme to accomplish something along these lines, here is the PHP you’ll need:

<ul id=”nav”>
<?php wp_list_pages(‘title_li=&depth=1’); ?>
</ul>
<?php if($post->post_parent)
$children = wp_list_pages(“title_li=&child_of=”.$post->post_parent.”&echo=0″); else
$children = wp_list_pages(“title_li=&child_of=”.$post->ID.”&echo=0″);
if ($children) { ?>
<ul id=”subnav”>
<?php echo $children; ?>
</ul>
<?php } else { ?>
<?php } ?>

Once you’ve got the code in place, you’ll want to style it to look the way you want it to. 


Tell WordPress to Function Like a CMS

So, you have an established WordPress blog, but you’ve seen the pro bloggers doing it and now you want to turn that blog into a Content Management System (CMS)? Many people probably weren’t aware of this trick (including many web developers), but one neat feature added with WordPress was the ability to have a different home and blog page without needing to install WordPress on a completely new directory.

In order to accomplish this, you first need to make sure that the page that you want to be your blog’s homepage is named home.php. This will be the page displayed at the root of your domain.

Next, you’ll want to create a new file named blog.php and place the following code within the file:

<?php
/*
Template Name: Blog
*/
// Which page of the blog are we on?
$paged = get_query_var(‘paged’);
query_posts(‘cat=-0&paged=’.$paged);
// make posts print only the first part with a link to rest of the post.
global $more;
$more = 0;
//load index to show blog
load_template(TEMPLATEPATH . ‘/index.php’);
?>

That is all you need for code in that file. Upload it to your theme. This code creates a loop of your index.php file in your theme (commonly used as the single post page) and displays it as a typical blog homepage. Because this page will pull from your index.php file, going forward, any changes you make to your index.php file will update on this page as well.

Now, go into your dashboard and create a new page called Blog. Then select the Blog file you just created in the Page Template drop-down menu in the right sidebar.

Once that is done, the last thing you need to do is go over to your permalink structure page (under Manage) and add /blog/ to your custom permalink structure. This means if you are using an optimal permalink structure, you would want to use a custom structure of /blog/%postname%/. If you are doing this to an established blog, you can easily use the Permalink Redirect plugin to redirect your old permalink structure to the new one.


Conclusion

Choosing a theme is not complicated once you know what you are searching for. To make the process easier, I’ve provided these tips for you to follow.

The post How To Pick a WordPress Theme appeared first on WP Fix It.

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What’s powering conversational search? Featured snippets, structured data and actions

Voice search is still hot, but it might be a little slower on the uptake than many predicted. Google and friends continue to bombard the consumer with new devices, with new possibilities and new ways of controlling them via voice. The results for these voice searches comes from a mix of actions, knowledge graph data and featured snippets. But, there’s a new data layer forming, slowly powering more and more parts of the voice experience. It’s a technology we’ve talked a bit quite often here at Yoast: structured data.

Voice is still coming, but maybe not as fast as expected

When the rise of virtual assistants started, many welcomed it as a new world order. Some predicted that by 2020, more than half of the searches would be voice activated. That was probably a bit optimistic. While adoption is still growing and big tech is pushing voice technology like there’s no tomorrow, it still feels like critical mass is off some ways.

Almost every new product announced by Google, Facebook, Amazon etc has an assistant on board. Take Bluetooth headphones for instance, almost every new one that hits the market these days has a voice assistant built in. The industry really wants everyone to talk to their devices. But, Google doesn’t think the future will be purely voice-driven. For many things, people will need a screen. A recent study by Google revealed that 50% of interactions combine voice and touch. 

Voice is two-pronged

It’s good to keep in mind that so-called voice search consists of two main parts:

  • Searching the web with your voice
  • Performing actions with your voice

Working on your voice search strategy, means you have to make a distinction between these parts. For many companies, building an action — “Ok Google, turn on the lights” — doesn’t make much sense. Searching the web, answering questions and guiding people with your content, does make sense. You’re looking to go into a conversation with your audience.

Searching the web with your voice

As mentioned before, for most site owners, the search part of conversational search is where it’s at. This is about using your voice to get search results and answers to your questions. This is also where you can work with your regular content, without having to invest loads of money into an unproven voice strategy based on building a conversational interface. Let’s take a look.

Search results get its data from:

Where do those search results come from once you ask your assistant to look something up for you? That depends on the question you’re asking and which assistant you are using. If we take Google as an example, we can break it down into three pieces:

  • Factual data: answer boxes powered by knowledge graph
  • More complex, general searches: Featured snippets
  • From Google’s own properties (local pack, maps, flights, shopping etc.)

If you ask: “Ok Google, how tall is the Eiffel Tower” you’ll get a nice voice result telling you “the Eiffel Tower is 324 meters tall”. This is all coming from the knowledge graph — the network of facts that Google has formed over the years. This is information Google can rely on for direct answers.

For more complex questions, Google often looks at the results it shows in featured snippets. A piece of content that appears as a featured snippet is proven to be a good result by Google. Of course, it is not infallible and sometimes you can find better results. But in general, if you have a featured snippet for a term/question/problem your content is the number one candidate for being spoken by a voice assistant. 

Ask Google: “Ok Google, what is a meta description” and it’ll speak out loud the featured snippets that Yoast has earned for that question. Try it! Of course, these results do change from time to time, but we’ve had this featured snippet for quite a while.

Here’s a recording Joost made of that query a while back

The third one encompasses all the answers to questions or queries that Google can fill from their own properties, like the local pack for local results, or Google Flights. Things tend to blur here quickly, as many Google-owned queries are turned into actions. So if you want to book a flight, that will trigger an action and not a search.

For most sites and types of content, the best chance of getting your content in voice assistants is via featured snippets. To get featured snippets, you need authority, a good reputation and awesome content. If you are already ranking on page one for your queries or phrases, you have a good chance at getting that coveted featured snippet! 

Since the launch of the BERT update, Google has a much better understanding language and can figure out complex, long-tail searches. This means that the search engine will come up with results that better match the search query. Google explicitly states that it uses BERT for featured snippets, so you have to keep that in mind. 

Of course, BERT is not infallible. It is a very sophisticated language model, but still only a model. It helps computers improve their understanding of language, but it won’t turn a computer into a human so to say. So everything comes down to readability! 

To maximise your chance at getting featured snippets, think of this: 

  • Do keyword research
  • Look at what’s ranking now and improve on that
  • Prioritize! Don’t try to get them all — only the ones where you can help your users with better content than your competitors
  • Check the user intent of the searches and match it to answers 
  • Use Answer the Public or Also Asked to find questions to answer 
  • Use easy to digest, simple to understand language
  • Keep your answers short and snappy
  • Speak your content out loud — or let your computer do it
  • Mark up your content with structured data (although not needed for featured snippets)
  • In general: make better content!

It’s a great sport to hunt for featured snippet opportunities and they can bring in awesome results, even with voice search.

Doesn’t Schema power featured snippets?

In the list above, you see I’ve mentioned structured data in relation to featured snippets. There’s a question that pops up regularly: does Google use structured data for ranking featured snippets? Your favorite Googlers have debunked this a number of times. 

At the moment, structured data is used for a lot of things, but not for featured snippets. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t add it to your pages — you should, because structured data makes your page a lot easier to understand for search engines —, but it’s not essential in getting those features snippets. Getting on page one with brilliant content is.

Performing actions with your voice

While getting featured snippets helps to get your content spoken out loud by voice assistants, having Schema is not. But this is not the end of the story. We see Schema popping up in ever more places, and one of those places is your smart assistant. Schema does power some voice-based actions — at least on Google. Google now lets you build actions based on your news, how-tos, FAQs, recipes and podcasts. 

Your structured data can be the starting point for voice actions

Google lets you build actions for assistants

Google uses so-called actions to find and present content that users can interact with on smart devices with the Assistant. You can build your own actions, so assistants can respond with your specific content. Building those, however, can require a lot of custom work and, therefore, probably not a viable option for many site owners. 

Luckily, Google also provides a much easier way to get particular pieces of web content ready for smart devices: the structured data found on your site. Yet another sign that Schema structured data is here to stay. 

Actions let you get something done using the Assistant

By adding structured data to your site, you’ll not only get a chance at rich results, but this enables Google to automatically generate actions for their Assistant. Talk about two birds with one stone. At the moment, of the dozens of supported Schema properties, Google can generate actions for five datatypes: FAQs, how-tos, news, podcasts and recipes. The first two were only recently announced.

Smart displays combine voice and screen to guide people — in this case a visual how-to

Of course, there are some caveats. For news content, for instance, Google only admits content built by publishers who already participate in Google News. FAQs and how-tos only work on smart displays, with the latter being in a developer preview and, therefore, not yet available for the general public. If you want, you can always sign up to register your interest if you want to start building right now.

Structured data needs minimal adjustments

Adding the necessary code isn’t too hard if you’ve already invested in Schema markup. There is a distinction between required and recommended properties. Sometimes, Google will nag you into adding more to make errors go away. Fully formed structured data might enhance your chance at getting rich results — or having the Assistant pull up your actions.

For some data types, you must add specific pieces of structured data to get a chance to appear on smart displays. If we look at recipes, for instance, you’ll notice recipeIngredient and recipeInstructions are recommended for rich results, but required for getting guidance on smart displays. But, if you’re looking to build a full recipe structured data implementation, you would add this anyway, right?

Adding valid How-to and FAQ Schema is easy with the structured data content blocks in Yoast SEO. Simply open a post in the WordPress block editor and add the block. Fill it with relevant content and you’re good to go!

Simply fill in the fields to build a how-to with valid structured data

Keep a close eye at the example code and the necessary properties. Google tends to change these regularly. And keep in mind that documentation and testing tools might not always be on the same page. Last thing you have to remember: you have no guarantee that your structured data leads to rich results, as the search engines decide on that.

Speakable Schema

Another relatively new addition to Schema is the speakable property. This is not an action built to let people interact with your content, but a way to tell Google which part of the page is fit for audio-playback. This used to work for Google News content in the US only, but Google recently opened it up for other types of content. If set up right, you’ll notice Google Assistant reads your content aloud, attributes it and sends the complete URL to your device. It is currently in beta, but should turn out to be a great way to help machines find out what they can read or not.

The value of voice for site owners

There’s a lot happening at the moment. The technologies powering voice search are giving search engines a better understanding of how humans communicate. They can use those insights to improve their search results to provide you with better answers to your questions. Plus, it allows them to develop new applications that help you do your job. That’s great, but how valuable is voice for a ‘regular’ type site? 

For most sites, having an elaborate voice strategy is not viable. It isn’t very cost effective to build actions for every type of assistant and hope for the best. Having a strategy for getting and keeping featured snippets is important. This is based on content you have — or can produce — and has the added bonus of working in two locations at one: search and voice.

In addition, there’s a new focus on structured data providing data for voice assistants — at least on Google. With Google pushing structured data so hard, it won’t come as a surprise if we see a lot more of this happening in the next year. For Google, Schema structured data provides a context layer of the web. Bringing the knowledge graph, language processing and computer vision into the mix, Google is well on its way to understand the world.

Conclusion

In this article, I showed a number of ways search engines like Google provide answers for their voice assistants. Now, you have a better understanding of the value of voice and the things you have to keep in mind when you want to set up a voice search strategy.

The post What’s powering conversational search? Featured snippets, structured data and actions appeared first on Yoast.

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5 Reasons to Avoid “Affordable” SEO Services

Falling for the “affordable” SEO services trap will wreck your business.

I don’t want that to happen to you!

This guide will explain why you need to avoid these services (and what to look for).

Then, I’ll show you what you can do if you have a limited SEO budget.

Let’s jump in.

Need SEO help? Secure your free SEO diagnosis today so you can explode your company with SEO this year.

What is Affordable SEO?

Everyone has their own perception what “affordable” means. For example, let’s say your business is generating millions in revenue every year. Then, $5,000 per month may seem affordable to you. If your company is making below six figures, then $5,000 per month would seem ludicrous. It’s all subjective.

There is one element of this argument that is true:

Good SEO isn’t cheap.

Let me show 5 reasons why hiring an affordable Search Engine Optimization company isn’t a good idea.

1. You Can’t Do Much Without Money

There are only so many actions you can take on a low SEO budget. The only actions you can take are those that are time-dependent and not capital-dependent.

Some time-dependent SEO actions include keyword research, page-level optimization, and some technical optimization. I say “some” technical optimization because you may need a developer for larger issues. Developers cost money.

With that said, you won’t get far with keyword research, optimizing pages, and doing some technical optimization.

It’s better than nothing. But, those are not the high impact activities that drive organic search growth.

The two biggest drivers of growth are content and backlinks. These two activities are also the most capital-intensive.

This is the point where affordable SEO services break down.

Since affordable SEO companies don’t have the capital, they:

  • can’t create quality content
  • can’t spend time doing link outreach
  • can’t pay for placement on quality sites

This results in two things:

1. They have to go cheap on SEO content creation, which will end up embarrassing your brand.

2. They will use gray or black hat backlinks that will get your site penalized.

Here’s the truth:

2. You Will Lose in the Long Run

I get it. You want to squeeze as much profit out of your business as you can. But there are some things in life that you never want to go “cheap” on.

SEO is one of those things.

Think about this way… would you try to find your wife the cheapest engagement ring?

Of course you wouldn’t because you know what the consequences would be.

The cost here is clear: your future wife won’t be happy!

And if you don’t already know this: happy wife = happy life.

Source

Get used to these marriage analogies since I’m married now.

With that out of the way, the cost of working with a cheap SEO company isn’t as black and white as getting your fiance a cheap engagement ring.

The reason is because the “cost” isn’t immediate. It takes months of working with a bad SEO company to realize the cost. This “cost” comes in many different forms.

First, cheap SEO will likely land you a penalty. So, even if the low-quality tactics work in the short-term, you will end up getting nailed later on. If your site gets penalized, you will have to hire another agency just to get the penalty removed. Once your site gets a penalty, it’s a long road to recovery. In fact, your previous traffic levels may never recover.

And these are only the visible costs.

You also have to take into account opportunity and time costs. If your site gets penalized, you will have wasted precious time and capital.

You know the value of time, money, and business assets.

Now here’s another part that stinks if you decide to go the cheap SEO route:

3. You Won’t Get Assets

Quality content and backlinks are ASSETS for your business. This means they will continue to bring your business value for the long-term.

Here’s the bad news:

Affordable SEO services won’t give you any tangible assets. That’s because they do not have the capital to create quality content assets or acquire quality link placements.

4. Scalability = Cookie Cutter

Most affordable Search Engine Optimization companies have to use cookie-cutter strategies. That’s because these companies won’t be able to scale if they have to do any creative work.

SEO is a dynamic skill. While the principles of quality SEO never change, every single campaign is different. Every client is at a different point and will have different needs.

A cookie-cutter approach rarely works and will almost always be low quality.

On top of that, cheap SEO companies will also be unresponsive. That’s because they do not have the time to communicate.

These companies allocate most of their resources to front-end sales. As a result, this leaves little resources for getting your business results. They are fine with a high client churn rate because of their front-end sales model.

Good agencies understand that SEO requires creativity and strategic pivots. No two campaigns are the same.

And unlike scale-based models, quality agencies value client RETENTION. For example, my SEO agency allocates most of our resources to testing and improving our services.

My philosophy is simple: if we focus on improving our service and getting results, then we don’t need to be as aggressive with front-end sales.

Here’s the takeaway on this point:

Most cheap SEO companies focus heavily on front-end sales, which leaves little resources for client fulfillment. Quality agencies allocate most of their resources to getting results and improving their service quality.

5. Experience is Priceless

Companies that offer affordable SEO services have to employ cheap labor. Cheap labor often equals inexperience.

The point is:

Good agencies aren’t cheap because they employ legitimate, proven experts. These experts are confident in their ability to get your business results. Therefore, they would never work for entry-level pay.

Do you know how to spot inexperienced workers in an SEO agency?

Look for any type of bragging about how large their staff is.

A single SEO expert like Brian Dean, Neil Patel, or Ryan Stewart can run circles around entire SEO teams.

Experience, skill and tested strategies and systems are what get SEO results. Not large staffs of entry-level workers.

What Affordable SEO Packages Look Like

It’s pretty easy to identify low-quality SEO services once you know the basics of SEO. Here are a few things to look out for:

Convoluted Proposals (and Full of Fluff)

Cheap agencies take advantage of business owners by injecting technical jargon into their proposals. This is an attempt to make it seem like they are doing a ton of work. In reality, 80% of the tasks they list either A) take a little time to complete and B) will have little or no positive impact on your campaign.

Content and Link Acquisition Get Little Attention

If you don’t see sections for content and link acquisition in an SEO proposal, then stop reading it. Content and backlinks are the two most impactful elements of a successful SEO campaign. If an agency doesn’t know this, then they don’t know how to get you results.

How Much Should You Pay for Quality SEO Services?

This graphic from Moz is a decent guide on SEO pricing. It is outdated and doesn’t factor inflation or the rising costs of SEO campaigns. Just remember, the lower the price, the less they can do and lower the quality will be.

3 Solutions for a Limited SEO Budget

Are you someone who wants to see the benefits of SEO, but have no budget to hire a good agency? That’s okay. There a few solutions to your situation.

1. Do It Yourself

Believe it or not, doing some of the SEO basics is often safer than hiring a cheap SEO agency. This gives you control and you are responsible for the success. It will also force you to learn more about SEO.

At the same time, your business is your baby and you want to do what’s best for it. That’s why you will want to use the safest, and most effective strategies. You can see results from SEO if you have the right guidance. Read, digest, and implement tactics from my blog.

2. Dip Your Toes

Once you understand the structure of an effective SEO strategy, you can start investing in the right components. For example, instead of you having to write content, you can hire a writer.

3. Wait

Don’t make a rash decision and hire an affordable SEO agency. If your budget is tight, then build up funds and wait to hire a quality agency down the road. Plus, there is so much you can do on your own that can help you grow your organic search traffic.

Conclusion

Hiring an SEO agency is an important decision for your business. Don’t take it lightly and most importantly, avoid falling for the “affordable” SEO trap.

Need SEO help? Secure your free SEO diagnosis today so you can explode your company with SEO this year.

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The UK election and SEO games: Search, scandal, and big promises

The UK goes to the polls this week and the governing Conservatives have already made headlines for their online activities. Luke Richards dives into the political battleground that is the Google SERPs – and provides his analysis of the manifesto promises relevant to the digital business community.

As the UK heads towards its third general election in four years, the two main parties – Conservatives and Labour – both seem to agree that investment in digital technologies is crucial to tackling challenges within the economy, the environment, and the country’s working relationship with the rest of the world after Brexit.

Both parties have also invested a significant amount of their marketing budgets in their digital campaigns.

These past few weeks we’ve seen examples of good and downright poor practice when it comes to search engine marketing. We’ve seen varying success in search visibility, online sentiment, and traffic. And the content of the manifestos themselves – for a digital/tech business audience – makes for fascinating reading in light of the challenges I’ve mentioned above.

Here is my analysis.

Search visibility of the manifestos

We are massively lucky in the UK with the amount of transparency and information at our fingertips as we decide who to vote for in elections.

There are bad actors, as we will discover later, but sites such as They Work For You, Vote For Policies, and The Political Compass all help to separate the quality content from the noise. And with just a couple of clicks, we can have immediate access to any manifesto.

Even before we’ve clicked through to the Conservatives’ manifesto landing page, we already know what the party’s central plan is – should they command a majority in the next parliament: “to get Brexit done.”

UK elections Conservatives manifesto landing page SEO meta content
UK elections Conservatives manifesto landing page SEO meta content

The “get Brexit done” mantra is one that is repeated countless times in the manifesto itself. I’d expected that the Conservative SEO team would be looking to get some visibility for this as a keyphrase. But a quick search for this finds the domain languishing only on page two of Google’s SERPs amid much negative press critical of this populist sloganeering.

Interestingly, the Liberal Democrats’ (a right-wing pro-Europe party) are targeting this key phrase as part of their paid search campaign – with their sponsored ads appear in position zero of the SERPs.

Beyond this, there isn’t much more to the search result save for the “vote conservative” call-to-action in the title and the URL. It’s notable for its brevity, leaving much of the rest of the SERPs open to be filled by positive and negative press, including two articles from The Daily Telegraph (a newspaper which previously employed Conservative leader Boris Johnson) and a well-ranked piece by Prospect magazine describing the party as a “threat to human rights”.

At first glance, the Labour party has adhered much better to onsite SEO best practice.

Their site links are well-served by Google. They command much of the SERP real estate and appear very useful to the user.

UK elections Manifesto Labour party Google SERP rich links
UK elections Manifesto Labour party Google SERP rich links

The choice for site links is a little surprising. The link to the “Accessible Manifesto” is a nice touch – showing consideration to web users who have difficulty reading the text. But the other links don’t really relate directly to the key policy points in the document itself such as their Green Industrial Revolution and National Education Service.

The closest the Labour search result has to a call-to-action is – the “be part of our movement – with your email address…” element, but it isn’t massively compelling.  Another misstep is that the PDF for Labour’s 2015 manifesto is still live and ranking well in position four of SERPs, which could quite easily confuse and frustrate users.

Sentiment elsewhere in the SERPs is more nuanced than what we see for the Conservatives. However, again, right-wing newspaper The Daily Telegraph takes position two and three of the SERPs – and although not immediately negative – one can imagine these articles aren’t massively objective after the user is moved to click through (although this content is behind a paywall).

Search traffic comparison

In the battle for search traffic, the Labour manifesto is vastly outperforming the Conservatives.

UK elections - Search traffic comparison showing the Labour Manifesto outperforming the Conservatives
UK elections search traffic comparison showing the Labour Manifesto outperforming the Conservatives

At its peak – shortly after publication at the end of November – the Labour manifesto got three times as much traffic as the Conservative manifesto did when it performed best on November 24th.

The related queries according to Google Trends are illuminating. “Labour manifesto waspi” is clearly the biggest policy point in search terms online. Another breakout keyphrase is “fake labour manifesto” highlighting some of the underhand tactics employed by the Conservatives (as we’ll discuss below).

For the Conservatives, related queries are dominated by long-tail keyphrases that users are typing in to differentiate the new UK Conservative manifesto – “conservative manifesto 2019 UK” from the Canadian equivalent “conservative manifesto 2019 Canada”. Sadly for Prime Minister Johnson, there’s no appearance of “get Brexit done”. Do Google’s users actually care about this policy? Perhaps not.

Banned Google ads and misleading websites

The appearance of the breakout search term “fake labour manifesto” as highlighted at Google Trends points to some of the more bizarre aspects of this general election. The Conservatives have appeared to dabble in black hat tactics, and outright fakery, to try and confuse voters and diffuse the positive results Labour is clearly getting online.

To coincide with the launch of Labour’s manifesto, the Conservative party set up a fake website at labourmanifesto.co.uk and launched a paid search campaign to capture clicks from the SERPs.

Google banned eight search ads of the Conservatives due to policy breach
Google banned eight search ads of the Conservatives due to policy breach

Google promptly banned eight of the Conservatives’ search ads

Google has promptly banned eight of the Conservatives’ search ads. The fake website is still live, but only really visible, currently, when searching for “fake labour manifesto” – and even then it appears below several news sources highlighting the Conservatives unethical behavior.

Google’s ad policy states:

“We value honesty and fairness, so we don’t allow the promotion of products or services that are designed to enable dishonest behaviour.”

I’d be very surprised if the Conservatives’ digital marketing team don’t know this.

But for the sake of democracy, it’s good to see the search engine stick to their principles here.

Promises to increase connectivity

Of the whole election so far, the digital policy which has perhaps received the most headlines is Labour’s “free full-fiber broadband to all by 2030”.

Back in 2016, Jeremy Corbyn won re-election as leader of the Labour Party on the back of such policy announcements as The Digital Democracy Manifesto. It’s not surprising that there is much reference to the emancipatory power of emerging technology and being properly connected in the current manifesto.

The digital democracy manifesto online flyer
The digital democracy manifesto

As the document states, the intentions behind the free broadband initiative are to – “boost jobs, tackle regional inequality and improve quality of life as part of a mission to connect the country”. It is firmly rooted in a fairly detailed nationalization plan which will see the establishment of British Broadband with two arms, British Digital Infrastructure (BDI) and British Broadband Service (BBS), as well as bringing the broadband-relevant parts of BT into public ownership.

While it is a little more buried in the Conservative manifesto, they have their own broadband plan too.

UK election the Conservative and Unionist party Manifesto 2019
UK election – Conservative and Unionist party Manifesto 2019

As is the case for nearly every policy point in the document, it is presented in reference to the UK’s ongoing relationship with the EU:

“We are Europe’s technology capital, producing start-ups and success stories at a dazzling pace. But not everyone can share the benefits”, it states.

“We intend to bring full fiber and gigabit-capable broadband to every home andbusiness across the UK by 2025.”

The policy is highlighted again in later pages as part of the government’s pledge to support rural life and coastal communities. “£5 billion in funding already promised”, it says. But beyond this, there is no detail on how much this broadband provision will cost to the end-user, nor to what degree it will be delivered by the private or public sector.

Education, skills and new technology

While the Conservative manifesto is presented through the lens of Brexit, the Labour manifesto is largely shaped by the environment and their central proposal to kickstart a ‘green industrial revolution.’

A skilled workforce is integral to this. The proposed National Education Service promises free education to everyone throughout their lives. This is of particular interest to those working in digital where we see re-training and re-skilling as increasingly important strategies to plug the skills gap in a fast-changing sector.

“With automation and the Green Industrial Revolution bringing major changes to industry,’ the manifesto states, ‘it is more important than ever that people have the opportunity to retrain and upskill throughout their lives…England already faces a shortage of people with higher-level technical qualifications, and demand for these skills will only grow as we create new green jobs.”

Skills are also a key feature for the Conservatives, despite the document failing to acknowledge the current gap businesses face.

A proposed £3 billion National Skills Fund is earmarked to upskill the British workforce.

“This fund will provide matching funding for individuals and SMEs for high-quality education and training”, the manifesto states.

“A proportion will be reserved for further strategic investment in skills, and we will consult widely on the overall design.”

The Conservatives also promise a further £2 billion to upgrade the entire further education college estate as well as planning to build 20 Institutes of Technology. Although there is little mention of what ends the skills fund and this education investment is for. Services are given a passing mention – “we should open up trade in services, in which the majority of us work and where most new jobs will be created.” – but there is little detail on what these service jobs are expected to be, how they will be supported by the state, and how they will be opened up.

Digital experience in health and public services

Healthcare is a massive issue in this election. Both parties are looking to emerging technologies as a way to help alleviate strains from underfunding and/or an aging population, as well as to improve diagnosis and patient experience.

Labour is pledging to increase spending across the health sector by an average of 4.3% per year. AI and cyber technology are two things earmarked for some of this investment, as well as state-of-the-art medical equipment. Their manifesto also acknowledges the importance of data rights to citizens within this increasingly digital area of our lives, promising to ensure:

  1. ‘Data protection for NHS and patient information.’
  2. ‘NHS data is not exploited by international technology and pharmaceutical corporations.’

The Conservative manifesto is not short on health tech promises either. They pledge to introduce an annual Health Technology Summit and they have also promised £1 billion extra annual social care funding to go towards – in part – new technology and facilities.

In the arena of citizen protections, the Conservative manifesto also proposes a new approach to cybercrime. “We will embrace new technologies and crackdown on online crimes”, the document states. “We will create a new national cybercrime force and empower the police to safely use new technologies like biometrics and artificial intelligence, along with the use of DNA, within a strict legal framework.”

The Labour party manifesto also devotes considerable wordcount to cybersecurity:

“Cybercrime and cyberwarfare are growing, all around the world. Every aspect of our lives, from the NHS to our nuclear facilities”, it states.

In response, the party plans to review two existing bodies – the National Cyber Security Centre and the National Crime Agency – to increase powers, capacity, and skills where necessary.

Labour also wants to extend more rights to citizens online with their proposed Charter of Digital Rights, as well as planning to introduce imprints for digital political adverts in an effort to combat fake news. Additionally, as part of their welfare plans, the party wants to give users multichannel access (online, telephone, face-to-face, and outreach support) to make help and assistance easier to access for all.

Costings

Both parties want big digital corporations to pay more tax. For Labour, this is a costed part of their plan to help fund their free broadband rollout and other projects (£23.7 billion from reversing cuts to corporation tax, £6.3 billion from unitary tax on multinationals, and £6.2 billion from their Fair Tax Programme).

UK elections costings of the Labour party
UK election – Costings of the Labour party

The Conservatives have also promised to implement a digital services tax although there is no mention in the manifesto or the accompanying costings document as to what this tax rate will be, what it will bring in to the government, and which digital services this is aimed at.

On this front, my guess is Google, Facebook, Amazon et al. will be more concerned if a Labour government gets in than if a Conservative one is re-elected.

Much reference is made to British Broadband in Labour’s costings document and it is easy to make the link between their tax and spend plans. When looking at broadband in the Conservative costings document, however, its cost as part of their infrastructure strategy is reiterated, but it’s hard to see how it will actually be funded.

Further analysis of both party’s costings documents highlights the divide between them

When it comes to skills, the link between the money that’s needed for Labour to roll out their Lifelong Learning is easy to see across two tables. Yet the Conservative manifesto and costings document are harder to process. There are numerous tables, as well as proposed investments such as the ‘National Skills Fund worth £3 billion’ (as it is described in the manifesto) looking like it won’t receive any more than ~£600 million per year from 2021 until the end of the parliament (adding up to just £1.8 billion in total).

Analysis of Labour and Conservative party's costing documents
Analysis of Labour and Conservative party’s costing documents

 

This trend continues in the context of health and public services technology.

£1 billion for social care per year is certainly a welcome promise by the Conservatives – with an aging population, staff shortages, and the availability of emerging technologies that help with remote care and increased independence for citizens. But when turning to the costings document again, this is nearly a third of the total income from the first year of their Sources of Revenue table and it doesn’t fill me with confidence that a party operating in the wake of their own austerity measures can actually deliver these PR-quotable lumps of cash.

Analysis of Labour and Conservative party's costing documents table 4

Takeaways for the parties

The search campaigns by both parties in the lead up to this election have positive and negative points.

The simplistic and memorable SEO approach from the Conservatives may well be all they need to convince voters. But through the lens of the Google SERPs, the “get Brexit done” slogan has brought about some negative sentiment and doesn’t seem to be driving the traffic as we might expect.

Closing note regarding the Labour Party

Labour, on the other hand, has seemingly tried to capture attention via a number of issues. This is reflected in the manifesto itself, the site structure and onsite SEO, and the traffic success the domain is having with niche key phrases such as “labour manifesto waspi”.

Closing note regarding the Conservative Party

Yet, to look at the above and assume that the Conservatives have been lazy with their online campaign is wrong. Their paid search activity appears to have been synchronized and calculated. And rather than put forward their own policies in an attempt to influence clicks to their manifesto content, they’ve turned their efforts to misleading users and firing cheap shots at Labour policies which are seeing a positive response online.

Of course, these underhand tactics within the SERPs weren’t an isolated incident.

The Conservatives were also criticized (by The New York Times and others) when their press office passed off partisan opinion as objective ‘fact-checking’ on Twitter. The party’s activists have also been found to be posing as the Green Party in Facebook ads (in an attempt to split the left-leaning vote).

In the world of digital marketing, all these channels carry weight, but I would argue that it is the party’s search activities that are the most worrying from a democratic point of view. There’s no shifting the blame to frivolous press office employees or activists here – fake microsites and time-sensitive paid search campaigns are far more strategic, and those in the upper echelons of the party should bear at least some responsibility.

Takeaways for digital businesses

The Conservatives have been punished by Google for some of their activities, but whether they are punished at the ballot box remains to be seen. In the world of search, it is never worth trying to deceive users or impersonate competitors for clicks.

Those of us working in the digital industries are very aware of both the challenges and the opportunities in a technologically transformed world. The skills gap is a very immediate issue for all businesses adopting digital tools and emerging technologies. It is important that there are state-supported programs to try and close this gap.

In the UK, we also need a government committed to connecting those in society who are left behind when it comes to broadband provision. This is significant for those wanting to start up digital businesses away from urban centers, as well as for those whose digital audiences will grow with the rollout of dependable internet in rural areas.

In the business context

Consumers expect data protections and commitment to security – as well as experiences that are seamless across channels and customer-led. As more and more parts of our lives become entwined with digital technology – be it in healthcare or other public services – we need to be able to trust that attitudes towards rights and data are citizen-led. Members of the public must be educated, empowered, and safe.

There is much pessimism about what is around the corner for the UK – a country faced with Brexit, the environmental crisis, and more besides. In a superficial sense, it’s possible to read these manifestos as a business owner and be daunted by the detail of corporation tax rises in the Labour document while feeling that the Conservatives would be a profit-friendly prospect. But it is the lack of detail in the Conservative manifesto which should be a major worry to corporations: the ‘digital services tax,’ the commitment to seemingly arbitrary investment lumps, and even ‘get Brexit done’ rings hollow after three years of failed negotiations – how can any corporation trust this?

A government that is committed to ethical, reasonable, transparent, and long term ideas about how we can work and live together is one that I feel we should be supporting at this election and those forthcoming in the US and elsewhere. After all, these are the virtues I would expect of a modern business faced with the challenges and opportunities of a future of digital transformation and emerging technology. It seems justified to expect this in politics too.

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The post The UK election and SEO games: Search, scandal, and big promises appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

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